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  • natural gas line

    Not a plumber so pardon the dumb question. I am going to run a gas line for my son in his basement for a dryer and I am wondering if there are any things I should pay particular attention to? I think it should be black iron? What about sealing compound? I have seen a "stick" of off white stuff, is that the right stuff? Check for leaks with dish soap? Those are the types of things I need help/advice with. Any and all help is appreciated!

  • #2
    NOT SURE IF A DRYER/ GAS BURNING APPLIANCE CAN BE INSTALLED IN A BEDROOM?
    MIGHT WANT TO CHECK WITH YOUR BUILDING AND SAFETY DEPT.
    AS FAR AS MATERIAL GOES, BLACK IRON IS FINE. PIPE DOPE SHOULD BE IN A PASTE FORM. THE STICK YOUR REFERRING TO I'VE NEVER TRIED, BUT AM AWARE OF.
    PERSONALLY WITH THE NEWER MATERIALS OUT THERE,(CSST) CORRIGATED STAINLESS STEEL TUBING. THAT WOULD BE MY CHOICE. GOES IN AS FAST AS YOU CAN HANG IT. COMES ON A REEL UP TO 250' LONG. PROBLEM IS YOU CAN'T BUY IT AS A CONSUMER. NEED TO BE LICENSED TO PURCHASE AND INSTALL IT. MAYBE YOU CAN WORK WITH A GOOD LOCAL PLUMBER.
    GOOD LUCK.

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    • #3
      Around here you need to use pipe dope that is rated for natural gas (will say it on the can), I don't think the stick form stuff is rated for natural gas, it may only be for galvanised water pipe.

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      • #4
        board in NM,

        There are a lot of sealants available that will work well with natural gas. If you can find it in your area I will recommend "RECTORSEAL T plus 2". It is a teflon based sealant that is rated by all of the appropriate agencies for use on natural gas. Unlike some of the other sealants available for natural gas it can also be used on potable water. By purchasing this brand you can use what is left on other projects. Plus it cleans up easily from your hands and clothes and has a long shelf life.

        Plumber Rick is correct that the stainless steel tubings available are fast and easy but I personally still like the old black pipe.

        There is nothing wrong with the dish soap method of leak detection. Be sure to test the entire fitting as well as the joint because once in a great while you will find one with a sand hole. If practical, test the entire length of the pipe if you buy it from a discount joint. I have found splits in the cheaper pipe. After testing, wipe dry and apply a thin coat of your cutting oil from a rag to keep the joints and pipe from looking rusty from the dish soap. Wipe away all excess oil. PLEASE DO NOT USE A LIGHTER TO CHECK FOR LEAKS.

        Be sure to follow the instructions on the sealant can or package of whatever you decide to purchase and be sure to size your pipe properly. Gas pipe is not all that hard to do but it is important that it be done properly so that your son does not wake up in a tree.
        Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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        • #5
          [QUOTE]Originally posted by plumber:
          [QB] board in NM,
          PLEASE DO NOT USE A LIGHTER TO CHECK FOR LEAKS.

          I laughed when I read that and then realised you have likely seen someone do this in order to mention it here

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          • #6
            I will second Plumbers comments.

            Here in Louisiana T+2 is the sealant of choice.

            It is easy to apply and any waste is easily wiped off with a cloth rag.

            I can be used for fresh water lines too.

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