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  • #16
    Re: As seen on another site

    From http://www.answers.com/topic/steel-pipe



    An early notable method for producing metal tubes quickly and inexpensively was patented by James Russell in 1824. In his method, tubes were created by joining together opposite edges of a flat iron strip. The metal was first heated until it was malleable. Using a drop hammer, the edges folded together and welded. The pipe was finished by passing it through a groove and rolling mill.
    Russell's method was not used long because in the next year, Comelius Whitehouse developed a better method for making metal tubes. This process, called the butt-weld process is the basis for our current pipe-making procedures. In his method, thin sheets of iron were heated and drawn through a cone-shaped opening. As the metal went through the opening, its edges curled up and created a pipe shape. The two ends were welded together to finish the pipe. The first manufacturing plant to use this process in the United States was opened in 1832 in Philadelphia.
    Gradually, improvements were made in the Whitehouse method. One of the most important innovations was introduced by John Moon in 1911. He suggested the continuous process method in which a manufacturing plant could produce pipe in an unending stream. He built machinery for this specific purpose and many pipe manufacturing facilities adopted it.
    While the welded tube processes were being developed, a need for seamless metal pipes arouse. Seamless pipes are those which do not have a welded seam. They were first made by drilling a hole through the center of a solid cylinder. This method was developed during the late 1800s. These types of pipes were perfect for bicycle frames because they have thin walls, are lightweight but are strong. In 1895, the first plant to produce seamless tubes was built. As bicycle manufacturing gave way to auto manufacturing, seamless tubes were still needed for gasoline and oil lines. This demand was made even greater as larger oil deposits were found.
    As early as 1840, ironworkers could already produce seamless tubes. In one method, a hole was drilled through a solid metal, round billet. The billet was then heated and drawn through a series of dies which elongated it to form a pipe. This method was inefficient because it was difficult to drill the hole in the center. This resulted in an uneven pipe with one side being thicker than the other. In 1888, an improved method was awarded a patent. In this process the solid billed was cast around a fireproof brick core. When it was cooled, the brick was removed leaving a hole in the middle. Since then new roller techniques have replaced these methods.

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    • #17
      Re: As seen on another site

      Yes............... but why 21' ?
      sigpic

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      • #18
        Re: As seen on another site

        Why NOT ??????????????
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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        • #19
          Re: As seen on another site

          hope this helps
          Attached Files

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          • #20
            Re: As seen on another site

            Nope, too small, can't read it. Does it splain why Lucey?
            sigpic

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            • #21
              Re: As seen on another site

              I can see it just fine. No explanation, just a humorous explanation of pipe installation. Worth the read.
              Buy cheap, buy twice.

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              • #22
                Re: As seen on another site

                "From http://www.answers.com/topic/steel-pipe"

                That is practically word-for-word the same history as the URL I gave. I wonder which site copied the other?

                At any rate it does not talk about how the 21 foot length came about. I have a query out to someone who
                may know though. He was around when the made the _first_ pipe I think
                "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                • #23
                  Re: As seen on another site

                  This is what the experts say:-

                  Dear Joshua,
                  Thank you for your enquiry. The 6 metre length is the equivalent of the original 20 foot length. Perhaps you are too young to remember what a "foot" is. This length was deemed to be the optimum for a single person to handle and also be transported on the top of a van/ute without unacceptable bending of the tube. Thus, manufacturing processes were designed to yield the most number of 20'/6m lengths with the minimum amount of scrap. Also, distributors/plumbing stores designed stock racks to accommodate tubes of the "standard" length.I trust that this response has satisfied your need.

                  Kind regards, JOHN WILLIAMSON

                  Technical Officer
                  Copper Development Centre Australia Limited
                  Email: williamson@1earth.net
                  Mobile phone: 0402044898
                  Phone (H): 61 2 42616861

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                  • #24
                    Re: As seen on another site

                    it is so when you drop one end of the pipe and it gets all bent up you cut that off and you still have your 20' leg
                    Charlie

                    My seek the peek fundraiser page
                    http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                    http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                    new work pictures 12/09
                    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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                    • #25
                      Re: As seen on another site

                      Funny enough, there was a show on the history channel just last week and they we're showing the manufacturing process for steel pipe. The machines put out 21' lengths.
                      sigpic

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