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Stainless Steel Supply Lines

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  • #16
    Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

    Earthquake country I can definitely understand the need. People around here use them a lot, you'll see some crazy bends to get them to fit too. Just boggles my mind
    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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    • #17
      Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

      After seeing the picture below hopefully some of you will reconsider the braided stainless supply lines. Back in the good ol days everything was spaghetti and lock ridge tools (most of you young guys don"t know what I'm talking about but you may have pulled off ridgid supply lines that had a nut on each end that was held on with brass friction rings. I have seen a lot of blow outs and many a braided supply line had rust spotting on it as well. Most of these homes were well maintained and had housekeepers (maids). I found that a lot of these gals had been spraying products such as 409 or Fantastic around or on the braided stailess lines to keep them looking good. On a related note I have seen where a tiny drop of the newer water soluble flux that dripped on to a non coated gas flex line will burn a pin hole through the stainless in less than a week. Hence, every new water heater install gets a new gas flex that has the yellow coating, the same goes for every new plumbing fixture,,,,,always new supply lines. I never liked the supply lines with "o" rings and never used the plastic supply lines. My supply line of choice is a braided connector made by brass craft. Any brown spots on the stainless supply lines require immediate removal, all you have to do is run your hand up and down the lines you can't see and if you yelp because you have been stabbed by some stainless theads it's time to replace it as well as the one next to it if it's a bathroom basin.

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      • #18
        Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

        rookie, typically i see this inside of kitchen cabinets, where all the cleaners tend to vent.

        anything that is chlorine or ammonia based will do this to the stainless flexes.

        the brasscraft are the polymer based flexes that look like stainless.
        i like them also.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #19
          Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

          Originally posted by HouseOfAtlas View Post
          When I take them apart, someone else has already installed it from years ago

          I don't install them that tight really. When I install a water closet connector, I will turn the connector on the fill valve by hand and then give it another 1/4" - 1/2" turn with a wrench.

          I can bottom out the nut on a fill valve by hand. Am I over tightening, I don't think so there is not that much pressure on the plastic nut.

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          • #20
            Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

            I have seen them leak . Have seen a few of the braided line just fall apart after getting some age on them. They are quick and easy.

            The most dependable for me has been the pex supply lines.

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            • #21
              Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

              Originally posted by HouseOfAtlas View Post
              I guess I never thought of it like that. Just like when I clean out a drain, if I take apart an old trap but it's still working (not leaking), why replace it?

              But if a supply looks old with rust, I do replace it and from now on I'll replace the old ones, even if they are only a couple years old.
              The difference is the material. A ptrap is not subject to constant pressure and they only part that wears out is the slip washers and I do replace these every time I remove a ptrap, no matter how good they look.

              I prefer watts risers for no particular reason. I found the way to install them so they don't leak is to pull straight back on the crimp while tightening so the washer doesn't go cockeyed. I hand tighten and turn on the water and tighten (within reason) until the water stops and then just a little more. I do the same technique for valve packing nuts.
              Buy cheap, buy twice.

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              • #22
                Re: Stainless Steel Supply Lines

                I have to agree with Harry I use a lot of pex closet supply lines and cant actually say I have had a problem with any that I have installed
                I have seen Pex supply lines leak that others have installed but it is usually because they used the metal ferrel that came with the shutoff valve instead of using the correct plastic ferrel
                Most of the service jobs that I have been on where the supply line is leaking it is usually a braided supply line that is leaking where the factory installed compession fittings are located just above the nut

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