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  • The hired help

    How many of you guys are happy with your hired help?

    Do you feel their level of education is adequate?

    Do you feel their level of skill is adequate?

    What do you pay apprentices on average?

    How about journeymen and masters?

    What percentage of your business is new construction, commercial, renovation, service and finally drain service.

    I'm asking because I would like to bring some real statistics to the students in my plumbing class. The figures you get from the Fed aren't too accurate.
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: The hired help

    Funny you ask. I have some of the same questions.
    Here are my anwers to your questions

    1.Most of the time my help does really good, but then there are days I could choke him. More non choke days than choke.
    2.I only have one employee so that makes it easier to keep up with whats going on.
    3. Comprehention seems to be a problem, mainly because of him being an immigrant.
    4. I pay by the hour, based on knowledge and how hard they work. My present employee makes $14.00 per hr. The least I have paid is $7.00 for laborer, can't afford a Master Plumber other than me. Barely pay myself these days.
    5. I do residential and small commercial new construction, remodels, service and repair, and some drain cleaning (refer most drain cleaning to buddy w/jetter).

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    • #3
      Re: The hired help

      How many of you guys are happy with your hired help?
      Depends on the day.

      Do you feel their level of education is adequate?
      NO! Both formal and trade

      Do you feel their level of skill is adequate?
      Yes and no, the transition back and forth from new construction(good) and service(not so good) tends to aggravate my journeymen and baffle the apprentices.
      Truly, I have good people. But some times...

      What do you pay apprentices on average?
      Better than average for Florida

      How about journeymen and masters?
      Better than average for Florida


      What percentage of your business is new construction, commercial, renovation, service and finally drain service.
      40% New, 60% service with 15% being drain service(mostly due to landscape architects dropping trees on my pipe, but also due to the prevalence of 1/8th inch per foot pitch on drainage in our loose soil.)

      In full disclosure I am only an employee, but I have the good job( at least my journeymen tell me this). My responsibility is everything but the money.
      Last edited by myakka; 12-11-2008, 12:39 AM. Reason: Needed

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The hired help

        Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
        How many of you guys are happy with your hired help? I can't find anyone that is not tatted and pierced everywhere and or has a bad habit to support...

        Do you feel their level of education is adequate? We do not have trade schools in the area so I'm lucky to get the bare minimum High School Diploma and has never seen a pipe wrench...

        Do you feel their level of skill is adequate? I have resigned myself to training up a good laborer (once I find one)

        What do you pay apprentices on average? $10 per hour to start

        How about journeymen and masters? Between $20 and $30

        What percentage of your business is new construction, commercial, renovation, service and finally drain service. 70% Service, 20% renovation,10% commercial

        I'm asking because I would like to bring some real statistics to the students in my plumbing class. The figures you get from the Fed aren't too accurate.
        Okie

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The hired help

          How many of you guys are happy with your hired help?
          I'm not

          Do you feel their level of education is adequate?
          I couldn't care less about how much education they have. All I need is a warm body.

          Do you feel their level of skill is adequate?
          They have no skills so my answer I guess is no

          What do you pay apprentices on average?
          $12/hr to start then up to $15/hr after about 2 years. If after 2 years he's not on a truck of his own, he probably never will be.

          How about journeymen and masters?
          Depends on how many duties he can perform and the quality of work.

          What percentage of your business is new construction, commercial, renovation, service and finally drain service.
          Up until last year it was 50% new construction. Now it's barely 20%. Service and site utilities are now carrying the company load. Getting hard to even find a decent remodeling project worth taking on. When the big 'O' gets here, I expect to see a 'change' right away

          I'm asking because I would like to bring some real statistics to the students in my plumbing class. The figures you get from the Fed aren't too accurate.
          I agree, any data the government puts out will be skewed and outdated by the time it's published.


          I've had 7 helpers in the past 6 years. Not one made it past 8 months. They were all eager at first; then they quit trying to learn so I quit trying to teach. I work alone now and get much more done because I'm not baby sitting.

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          • #6
            Re: The hired help

            Thanks you guys, eye opening isn't it? Anyone else, pleas add your stats here.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Re: The hired help

              I'd love to see the answers of these very same questions to union shop owners/superintendents.

              I would be willing to bet there'd be a huge difference... for the positive.
              Proud To Be Union!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: The hired help

                Originally posted by Aaron91 View Post
                I'd love to see the answers of these very same questions to union shop owners/superintendents.

                I would be willing to bet there'd be a huge difference... for the positive.

                I'm sure they would be different, to bad the majority of the country can't afford union labor if it could there would be apprentice training programs everywhere...

                For some reason the UAW keeps comming to mind... I see how good Michigan is doing as a union stronghold

                I'm pro union and believe it is a good gig if you can get it BUT they end up being their own worst enemies in the long run...

                Okie

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The hired help

                  Originally posted by Aaron91 View Post
                  I'd love to see the answers of these very same questions to union shop owners/superintendents.

                  I would be willing to bet there'd be a huge difference... for the positive.

                  believe me aaron, having been in the union from 81-95, i can tell you that there are plenty of guys that went from shop to shop. they're barely worth the 10 cents to call the hall and replace them.

                  back in the day it was a dime

                  do they even have pay phones now

                  get your union education and experience. then it's time to move from the womb and open up your own place

                  rick.
                  phoebe it is

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                  • #10
                    Re: The hired help

                    You first !!!!!!
                    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The hired help

                      " I would be willing to bet there'd be a huge difference... for the positive."
                      From my experience of hiring people out of the hall, I'd say there isn't a huge difference. Training, which is necessary, is a union strength. However, you can't teach motivation. And, without motivation, productivity suffers. Paying union scale without enhanced output is not sustainable. I've found that the surest way to a productive workforce is to hire energetic young people with a head on their shoulders and put them through a combination of in house and union apprentice training. The critical factor is the person, not the system. Finding people willing to work hard and treating them fairly is a win win situation. Unfortunately, the finding usually entails trial and error. Over the years, my success rate has been abysmal.

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                      • #12
                        Re: The hired help

                        When i started in 1975 you did not talk back and listened. If you smarted back the journeyman became stupid until you started to listen and respected what he wanted done. The apprentices today act like they are doing you a favor just showing up to work. No motivation just give me my check. Us old guys are looking better every day!!!!!

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                        • #13
                          Re: The hired help

                          I believe the problem we are facing is an epidemic sense of entitlement from the younger generations brought about by a combination of poor parenting and a buy / consume culture

                          Okie

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