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What is this tool used for ?

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  • #31
    Re: What is this tool used for ?

    Rick - now that you know what is your bid????

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: What is this tool used for ?

      Originally posted by leakfree View Post
      Well at least somebody was able to identify it . Must not have been a very popular / necessary tool back in the days of old . The only way that I could figure out how to use it was to wrap it around a vent or waste line and clip the copper into the sized cutouts on it . Any value as an antique or just keep it as a novelty tool ?



      Thanks for the help
      Hang it up for wind chimes............

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: What is this tool used for ?

        Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
        Am I an idiot?

        How is that thing used to hold pipes together?

        Looks like more of a shoehorn to me
        I think you hook one end on the pipe (that's where the 3/8" - 7/8" range comes in), and stretch the spring out and hook the other end on the pipe further down the line. The spring keeps tension on the joint so it won't move. I understand how it works now that I know what it is supposed to do, but its still kinda tough to describe. You could also wrap it around to hold a branch such as when soldering a tee.

        I'd like to see that catalog page too, please send it if you would.


        Rick, now that you know what it is, I bet you NEED one in the worst way.
        ---------------
        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
        ---------------
        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
        ---------
        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
        ---------
        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: What is this tool used for ?

          propress doesn't reqire anything more than a marker/ sharpie.

          i predict that 1 day, people will be amazed we ever soldered.

          i'll look for 1 at the swap meet next time i go.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: What is this tool used for ?

            i've had the pipe and fitting come apart while soldering.

            all i do is re-insert the pipe and give the fitting a little squeeze with pliers to hold the pipe in place.

            this has been working for me for a number of years.

            Vince

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: What is this tool used for ?

              Thats exactly what I do, if the pipe is a little loose, I give it a little pinch with the channellocks. Why didnt they think of that back then.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: What is this tool used for ?

                Originally posted by Vince the Plumber View Post
                i've had the pipe and fitting come apart while soldering.

                all i do is re-insert the pipe and give the fitting a little squeeze with pliers to hold the pipe in place.

                this has been working for me for a number of years.

                Vince
                A slight squeeze with the pliers and then rotate 90 degrees works for me. With this method you have to deform the pipe less.

                Another is to give the end of the pipe a little tap (while held at an angle) against a hard surface thereby making it slightly oval and it will grab the fitting well.
                ---------------
                Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                ---------------
                “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                ---------
                "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                ---------
                sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: What is this tool used for ?

                  Originally posted by LoKo498 View Post
                  Thats exactly what I do, if the pipe is a little loose, I give it a little pinch with the channellocks. Why didnt they think of that back then.
                  Because channelocks hadn't been invented yet.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: What is this tool used for ?

                    Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
                    Because channelocks hadn't been invented yet.
                    In 1962 they didn't have Channelocks or some reasonable facsimile thereof?

                    I know my toolbox didn't have Channelocks in it in 1962, but I was only 8 and my toolbox had a hammer, a pair of slip-joint pliers, a couple screwdrivers, a try square, and a keyhole saw. I think that was ll of it anyway. All I have left is the slip-joint pliers. I lost the rest of the past 40 odd years.
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                    ---------
                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                    ---------
                    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: What is this tool used for ?

                      Some more info on the Number 71 from someone here at RIDGID .

                      "The number 71 was marketed as the Ridg-jig, and was meant to hold copper tubes firmly in their coupling for soldering. It was discontinued over 35 years ago, after short time in the market.

                      it was first introduced in 1962, and billed as "an extra hand…holds joints steady and tight for fast, leak-proof soldering". You could configure the tool to hold in-line, 45 degree, and 90 degree joints."

                      (Roundup folks may have a good guess at who the info came from)

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: What is this tool used for ?

                        Originally posted by LoKo498 View Post
                        Thats exactly what I do, if the pipe is a little loose, I give it a little pinch with the channellocks. Why didnt they think of that back then.
                        Because most plumbers of that era would be threading galvanized pipe for their water systems! Copper was not as widely used.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: What is this tool used for ?

                          sometimes i will use my locking tape measure to support a 45 degree joint in place.

                          this only works if the joint is 1 ft or less from from what ever the tape measure is on.

                          Vince

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: What is this tool used for ?

                            Cat sheet... check out the price ;-)

                            http://www.ridgidforum.com/josh/No71_RIDGJIG.pdf

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: What is this tool used for ?

                              Instead of squeezing with a pair of Channel Locks try giving the end of the pipe a tap with the claw end of a hammer , makes two little indents on the end of the pipe . If the joint has to be disassembled it comes apart and reassembles easier with just the two small divots on it .
                              Steve in the trade since 73 doing new residential/Commercial work

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