Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

What I see:

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What I see:

    What I see:

    My profession, my trade, my life’s work is changing. Though the basic underlying principals of modern plumbing have been in force for over a hundred years now, tools, methods and materials are all changing the face of today’s plumbing. Many old timers have seen the slow demise of cast iron, bell and spigot DWV piping and the change from galvanized to copper and the steady rise of the plastics. With the general acceptance of these new materials the very nature of the work itself changes. A single skilled craftsman can now accomplish jobs that would take a crew of three to five men. And he will do that job in half the time. It was not that long ago that plumbers were notoriously famous for having bad backs from lugging sticks of cast iron pipe up two flights of stairs day in and day out. Cast iron tubs and sinks along with massive china toilets have given way to fiberglass, stainless steel and much lighter and more compact toilets and fixtures. These advances all lead to a more productive and healthier plumber. When I was an apprentice many moons ago, there was no such thing as battery powered tools. Every screw we drove and every piece of pipe we cut was done by hand or with a heavy corded power tool. My foggy brain is trying to remember if we even had chop saws back then. I don’t think we did but even if they were available the boss was too cheap to buy one. Then again, I seem to recall that we apprentices were working for $ 4.25 and hour too. So many things have changed and are still changing. It is the nature of the business and the trade. Through it all though, the basic principals remain the same. We still calculate DFU, SFU, flow rates and pressure loss the same way we did a hundred years ago. The b principals of proper venting, backflow and cross connection will in all likelihood never change because all these things rely on engineering that was done flawlessly so long ago by men that were what we are today. Professionals entrusted with Protecting the Health of the Nation.
    Attached Files
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: What I see:

    When you were a kid, indoor plumbing probably didn't exist. Its 2009. Get over it old man.
    Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What I see:

      Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
      What I see:

      My profession, my trade, my life’s work is changing. Though the basic underlying principals of modern plumbing have been in force for over a hundred years now, tools, methods and materials are all changing the face of today’s plumbing. Many old timers have seen the slow demise of cast iron, bell and spigot DWV piping and the change from galvanized to copper and the steady rise of the plastics. With the general acceptance of these new materials the very nature of the work itself changes. A single skilled craftsman can now accomplish jobs that would take a crew of three to five men. And he will do that job in half the time. It was not that long ago that plumbers were notoriously famous for having bad backs from lugging sticks of cast iron pipe up two flights of stairs day in and day out. Cast iron tubs and sinks along with massive china toilets have given way to fiberglass, stainless steel and much lighter and more compact toilets and fixtures. These advances all lead to a more productive and healthier plumber. When I was an apprentice many moons ago, there was no such thing as battery powered tools. Every screw we drove and every piece of pipe we cut was done by hand or with a heavy corded power tool. My foggy brain is trying to remember if we even had chop saws back then. I don’t think we did but even if they were available the boss was too cheap to buy one. Then again, I seem to recall that we apprentices were working for $ 4.25 and hour too. So many things have changed and are still changing. It is the nature of the business and the trade. Through it all though, the basic principals remain the same. We still calculate DFU, SFU, flow rates and pressure loss the same way we did a hundred years ago. The b principals of proper venting, backflow and cross connection will in all likelihood never change because all these things rely on engineering that was done flawlessly so long ago by men that were what we are today. Professionals entrusted with Protecting the Health of the Nation.
      well said
      Mike
      Clark County Plumbing And Drain
      www.plumbinginclarkcounty.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What I see:

        Originally posted by Service Guy View Post
        When you were a kid, indoor plumbing probably didn't exist. Its 2009. Get over it old man.
        It did, we just didn't trust in the newfangled thing. Besides which, pooping in the house, that's just disgusting.
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What I see:

          I don't know I guess some of the new materials may have better performance but they sure took the skill out of plumbing. There was a time a guy could not just call himself a plumber because he owned a pickup truck.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What I see:

            Well I guess it's up to us Masters to carry on the traditions that we were taught. Just because a material is lighter and perhaps faster to install, should not have to mean that it can be put in with any less care or skill.

            I still teach lead joints, threading, and soldering to the class and I don't see myself changing my curriculum any time soon.
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What I see:

              That sounds like the fire sprinkler trade also.

              Use to be all sch 40 screw pipe, no stinking victaulic couplings, use a set of threaded flanges.

              Ten men to a crew.

              All threads that were cut in the field were cut by hand, yes even 6 and 8 inch.
              Walking the floor with chain tongs.
              Making your own pipe dope.
              Just think, no all thread rod for hangers, cut plain rod to length and then thread each end.
              No scissors lift, climb that A frame ladder and put it in the hangers.
              No electric hydostatic pump, hand pumped to 200 psi.
              No hammer drill for those drop in anchors, I would venture to say most have never seen a real "red-head" that you hammer in by hand and never seen a (can't think of the name of it) rotory jack for drilling them into a high concrete ceiling, had two hand cranks on it like bicycle pedals.

              Sure has come a long way, sch 10 pipe, vic couplings and fittings, all thread rod, portable band-saw, thread o lets, portable electric pipe threaders, aluminum wrenches, cpvc pipe for sprinklers, etc, etc.

              I learned from an old timer, died this year at 89 years old and still in pretty good shape, only retired two years ago. Damn if he didn't have some good stories.

              G3

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What I see:

                It doesn't bother me that much. Except maybe for the demise of copper use.

                This is the way of EVERY type of production ever done in the U.S.

                Do you really want to go back?

                J.C.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What I see:

                  There's a thread on DIY.com with a fellow asking why he can't run PEX for gas line.





                  hose
                  Member
                  Join Date: Feb 2009
                  Location: texas
                  Posts: 2


                  Pex pipe
                  Can pex pipe be used for propane line outside the structure using compression fittings or crimped fitting?
                  I have a leak between the house and the tank and if useable it's alot less than copper.
                  Last edited by DUNBAR PLUMBING; 03-03-2009, 12:33 AM.
                  Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What I see:

                    Sure you can Dunbar. Remember that pic of the Tankless with the PEX gas line?

                    J.C.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What I see:

                      "It blow'd up REAL GOOD!" Said CNN correspondent Rachel Wilkins.
                      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What I see:

                        Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
                        There's a thread on DIY.com with a fellow asking why he can't run PEX for gas line.





                        hose
                        Member
                        Join Date: Feb 2009
                        Location: texas
                        Posts: 2


                        Pex pipe
                        Can pex pipe be used for propane line outside the structure using compression fittings or crimped fitting?
                        I have a leak between the house and the tank and if useable it's alot less than copper.
                        Stoopid peeple are numerus.
                        Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Water pipes

                          Originally posted by jkjllkj
                          Now that is a lot of brass air fittings http://www.liangdianup.com/subpages/airfitting_1.htm there is just about every type
                          of air fitting that you could want. Wholesale prices too. I guess these could be used as small water pipe fitting also. I
                          used some of the parts to make my babington wvo burner.
                          Spam
                          Seattle Drain Service

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X