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  • Code interpretation question

    Easyman's T&P termination question got me to thinking. How is condensation disposal handled in your various jurisdictions?
    2006 UPC (2007 CPC) 814.0 directs discharge "to an approved plumbing fixture or disposal are". 814.3 specifies dry wells or leach pits.
    Nowhere is mentioned dumping on the ground outside of the building (as with a relief valve), yet it is common practice to do so in my area.

  • #2
    Re: Code interpretation question

    Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
    Easyman's T&P termination question got me to thinking. How is condensation disposal handled in your various jurisdictions?
    2006 UPC (2007 CPC) 814.0 directs discharge "to an approved plumbing fixture or disposal are". 814.3 specifies dry wells or leach pits.
    Nowhere is mentioned dumping on the ground outside of the building (as with a relief valve), yet it is common practice to do so in my area.
    That's because "dumping on the ground outside of the building" is one of those "approved areas".

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Code interpretation question

      [QUOTE=ToUtahNow;214245]That's because "dumping on the ground outside of the building" is one of those "approved areas".
      Not always! SF 2004 complete remodel 1927 HOME All new C.I. ,COPPER,RADIANT HEAT, BLAA BLAAA, ABOUT $750,000 remodel. Additional laundry on the 2nd floor. Drain pan
      under wash machine,Watts valve shut off W/sensor in pan. Ran copper outside exterior wall
      to 6" above ground. Wouldn't pass, Dan u know who. He Wanted it trapped with a primer.
      He settled for a run to the basement floor drain. Talked to other inspectors with S.F.
      They couldn't believe it!
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Code interpretation question

        Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
        Easyman's T&P termination question got me to thinking. How is condensation disposal handled in your various jurisdictions?
        2006 UPC (2007 CPC) 814.0 directs discharge "to an approved plumbing fixture or disposal are". 814.3 specifies dry wells or leach pits.
        Nowhere is mentioned dumping on the ground outside of the building (as with a relief valve), yet it is common practice to do so in my area.
        Don't try this with most Insp. in S.F.
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Code interpretation question

          Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
          That's because "dumping on the ground outside of the building" is one of those "approved areas".
          With a condensate off an A-C coil I'd agree with you, Mark. But, from a condensing furnace or boiler the discharge will be somewhat acidic and not fit for dumping on the ground. For that matter, running acidic condensate to a metallic floor drain would also eventually cause damage to the drain (and any downstream cast iron pipe). However, running it through a lime filter first would be acceptable. Tool, I've had this conversation with Tony Amable, SF's boiler expert and he concurs that a neutralizer is required. Plus, he points out, the liming agent needs to be recharged on a regular basis.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Code interpretation question

            There is no cross contamination hazard with condensation and no real pressure. So the critical thing is to make sure there is no water damage to the building. So a floor drain or outside seem equally fine. Just glue the joints please.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Code interpretation question

              Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
              With a condensate off an A-C coil I'd agree with you, Mark. But, from a condensing furnace or boiler the discharge will be somewhat acidic and not fit for dumping on the ground. For that matter, running acidic condensate to a metallic floor drain would also eventually cause damage to the drain (and any downstream cast iron pipe). However, running it through a lime filter first would be acceptable. Tool, I've had this conversation with Tony Amable, SF's boiler expert and he concurs that a neutralizer is required. Plus, he points out, the liming agent needs to be recharged on a regular basis.
              You're absolutely correct. I was referring to A/C condensate and wasn't even considering condensing furnaces and heaters. Mike Mitchell from San Francisco Building and Safety taught the class on direct vent heaters during the ICC EDU Code and that was one of the things he covered. His slide in his Power Point presentation had the condensate draining to a laundry tray.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Code interpretation question

                Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                Mike Mitchell from San Francisco Building and Safety taught the class on direct vent heaters during the ICC EDU Code Mark
                When I have a particularly perplexing code question Mike is on my short list of people I consult. Another used to be (he's retired now) John Halliwill at the IAPMO office and before him the great George Kaufmann.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Code interpretation question

                  I have a York 95% furnace going in 2 weeks from now,in S.F.. Yes it has a filter before it dumps
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                  Comment

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