Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bacterial Iron?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bacterial Iron?

    What methods have any used for success in removing "Bacterial Iron"?

    Thanks.

    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: Bacterial Iron?

    Bacterial iron? Is that what happens under your armpits when you don't shower for a week? Dunbar probably has discovered how to remove the buildup during one of his "no-showering" episodes.

    I Love ya Dunbar, but you make it way to easy crack jokes at your expense.
    Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Bacterial Iron?

      I have never even heard of it until today.
      But I found this...

      1. Prepare the chlorine solution.
        • Approximately 8 quarts of 5.25% (or 5 qts. of 10%) chlorine bleach such as Hylex, Chlorox, etc., should be mixed with 100 gals. of water. It is best to prepare an amount more than the amount of water standing in the well, and the 100-gal. measure is a safe estimate if this is not known. Most garbage cans hold 30 gals. or more, so that filling three (clean, of course) cans with the solution is sufficient.
      2. Pour or pump the solution into the well in one continuous flow. Attach a hose to a faucet and, making certain the hose itself is clean, place the other end of the hose into the well. Open the faucet and recirculate for one hour the now-chlorinated water, washing down the inside of the casing and the pump piping. Faucets in your house should be opened until you detect a chlorine smell, then close them.
      3. Allow the chlorine solution to remain in the well and piping for at least 24 hours, preferably longer. The system should then be purged free of chlorine. Since it can disrupt a septic system, the chlorinated water should be run outdoors, perhaps into a ditch. It may also kill grass and shrubs, and should not be run into a lake or stream.
      4. Well owners may need to repeat this process more than once. If indications of iron bacteria persist, a water sample should be analyzed by a laboratory. Collect the sample only when the system is completely free of the chlorine smell.
        • For problem cases, a more complex process involving shock chlorination followed by introducing a strong acid and salt solution has proven effective. This process should be done only by a licensed well driller or pump installer, and requires prior DNR approval.
      Mechanical treatment

      In addition to chemical treatment, other methods are available to control iron bacteria in community water systems. Stagnant water conditions can be avoided by looping dead-end plumbing lines and periodically flushing low-flow lines to reduce bacteria. Forcing hot water or steam into a well to disperse the slime and kill the bacteria has also worked well. In addition, flushing large quantities of heated water into the aquifer has been found successful in field tests.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bacterial Iron?

        The above post pretty much covers it. Bleach. Usual shocking the system will remove it.

        Its actually manganese bacteria. Iron bacteria is a bit different but commonly mistaken.

        What makes you think you have a bacteria issue?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bacterial Iron?

          I've worked with Iron Softeners and other things but the customer says they have been told that it is specifically Bacterial Iron.

          I've taken a sample and sent it off to confirm the Bacterial Iron, Ph, Manganese etc levels.

          Want to do my work ahead of time to be ready for the right installations.

          J.C.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bacterial Iron?

            Good luck getting rid of it. Iron filters don't work that i've found so don't waste your cutomers money. Hopefully I'll be replacing all the toilets in a monistary because the iron bacteria has plugged all the ports. The system is huge and I told them I won't try to bleach it. they can call someone else in to try it. It is a tuff thing to get rid of. Good luck

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bacterial Iron?

              Originally posted by saysflushable View Post
              Good luck getting rid of it. Iron filters don't work that i've found so don't waste your cutomers money. Hopefully I'll be replacing all the toilets in a monistary because the iron bacteria has plugged all the ports. The system is huge and I told them I won't try to bleach it. they can call someone else in to try it. It is a tuff thing to get rid of. Good luck
              My understanding too. Many have worked with "iron" and had success but few have worked with "Bacterial Iron" that I know. Me included.

              I get conflicting information for treatment but am still looking/asking.

              Thanks for letting me know what you've ran into and tried.

              J.C.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bacterial Iron?

                A company that specializes in system chlorination for schools and hospitals might be capable of removing the problem. Contact one in your area and ask.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bacterial Iron?

                  Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
                  A company that specializes in system chlorination for schools and hospitals might be capable of removing the problem. Contact one in your area and ask.
                  This is a common problem here in wells. You can use an Ozone filter or clorinate to solve it. The clorinater is about 6500.00 less. Most people clorinate their well and then put in filters to get the clorine out of their house.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X