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  • And you call this, Plumbing?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXIalogsGNI





    This is new construction, 12 years old. Water lines are caving towards the flue, the plumber ran that cpvc right against the flue up top. It's double wall B vent at that point but you still know there's a heat source.

    The use of plastic tube talons is ridiculous knowing that even with the weight of the tank and half water ......then when it ruptures and has full weight, is too damn much for that piping.

    The customer did not want to replace the defective PRV and Expansion Tank. I have still pictures coming along with how I finished this off, which involved two sharkbites.


    And if anyone wants to knock sharkbites...let me just say this:

    I'm never going to have a glued connection on water lines in plumbing, ever. I've gotten this far without it, I'm going to continue to do so and sharkbites are the only way I can get around that. For years I turned down calls that dealt with CPVC and I figure the people thought oddly of my resistance.

    That piping inside the house I'm showing is effing retarded folks. It looks horrible and it was strapped to death and it still flopped down between the supports.

    Some might think sharkbites was worse than the CPVC...but I doubt it, seriously. Would it kill somebody to take the time and do it right? Apparently, yes.
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  • #2
    Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

    Interesting opinion on the Glued Joints I Have Thousands of Glued joints In Service Never One Leak ...(except a couple of Dry Fits) But now I mark all my Joints :-)

    Dave

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    • #3
      Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

      Dunbar,Is it possible this was by a Licensed cont.? signed off by the city?
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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      • #4
        Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

        CPVC is loaded with heavy metals. I wouldn't want it for water pipe personally.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

          Check out the venting as illegal as hell up here in alberta. They used a lite gauge wye and ran the hwt into the bottom. What a creative mind, too bad it was a dangerous one. Old cpvc sucks even when using shark bites as the hot runs are usually quite brittle after years of use. Just finished a nightmare under a mobile.

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          • #6
            Re: And you call this, Plumbing?








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            • #7
              Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

              Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post












              That Is Bull$hit I cant belive thats even allowed!!! Are you allowed to have the T&P valve piped to a drain? Or Is it 6-12 from ground for you also?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                Originally posted by NoeEttica View Post
                Interesting opinion on the Glued Joints I Have Thousands of Glued joints In Service Never One Leak ...(except a couple of Dry Fits) But now I mark all my Joints :-)

                Dave

                To each their own, but I can't bill another hour's labor to watch paint dry (glue) and I don't trust gluing a pipe and running pressure through it so quickly. The can usually states 2 hours before air testing, 24 hour cure time.....????!!!!

                It wouldn't matter if a plumber said I had 10 million of those connections without a leak...I'm not ever going to have a glued connection under my name in this profession. And just look at the condition of that piping. It's atrocious. I'm not going to do this to my customers.

                The reason all that piping dropped down over top of that heater is heat and weight, those tube talons always snap off because the hot/cold, hot/cold back and forth and stressing of the plastic eventually causes them to fail.

                I've never seen copper pipe wilt like lettuce over the years. I mean comon, this was in a 300,000 dollar home. It looks like a kid put it in. How many damn supports do you need? 1 every foot? That gets time consuming and pricey in the entire job, every job.



                Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
                Dunbar,Is it possible this was by a Licensed cont.? signed off by the city?
                Absolutely. Passed with flying colors, even where they ran that piping right against the flue, even though it was double wall B-vent. This **** looks like this over time....it's horrible.


                Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                CPVC is loaded with heavy metals. I wouldn't want it for water pipe personally.
                I told the lady to LEAVE all faucets open till they stopped spitting air. She didn't listen. I went upstairs to check things and in 10 minutes I bet between the expansion of the cpvc and air inside the pipes, there must of been 150-200 pounds of air pressure in that system.

                There was a huge language barrier but I didn't say turn them off....which kinda pissed me off knowing how dangerous compressed air can be in a home. And of course, they'd blame me. I always run all faucets open till they are running solid, stops that problem instantly..



                Originally posted by NJOY PLBG View Post
                Check out the venting as illegal as hell up here in alberta. They used a lite gauge wye and ran the hwt into the bottom. What a creative mind, too bad it was a dangerous one. Old cpvc sucks even when using shark bites as the hot runs are usually quite brittle after years of use. Just finished a nightmare under a mobile.
                It's terrible, you're right. Treat it like glass basically.

                I didn't care for the setup on the venting either, but there's no other way in that particular situation. Can't raise the wye any higher.

                PowerVent would be the only viable option, much more money though.


                So with all this now to print and picture,


                You all get an idea why this plumbing profession is getting pissed away by our very own hands. You got this **** being done on a regular basis "because we won't get jobs running copper" and there's the most ridiculous excuse for looking the other way, putting in garbage.

                And if someone is to knock me for sharkbites?

                Tell me who's worse, the initial installer that put in that clusterfutk of workmanship, if you call it that, or the service plumber trying to make something of a replacement water heater.

                I wish there was someway to of forced a PRV and EXP tank replacement on this one, but the house being sold kept them from doing it, and the code is relaxed for enforcement over 80psi. It used to be code here at one time, and they quit because of political reasoning. That's a whole nother topic I don't want to venture into.
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                • #9
                  Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                  Why did they change the heater?

                  J.C.

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                  • #10
                    Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                    I like the black iron gas pipe right to the appliance, no copper- nice Dunbar.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                      Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
                      Why did they change the heater?

                      J.C.


                      Nobody has told them yet, but they think it's keeping them from selling the home.


                      BrandonG, I put that pipe "back" so it would go to the drain when it eventually leaks......and I believe it will happen sooner than later.

                      In KY, code states within 2" of the floor, and yes, you can run it to anywhere and send it to the drain or indirect into another fixture, the ground if you take it outside. Just has to be visible when it happens so people know the device is malfunctioning.

                      That piping above was a effing joke. Unreal that I was working with it, thinking how stupid the situation really is.
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                      • #12
                        Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                        Something did look screwy with the weld/connection points though on the original one. I know the cpvc was sagging but it looks like the metallic part is actually screwed in on an angle.

                        J.C.

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                        • #13
                          Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                          Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
                          Why did they change the heater?

                          J.C.
                          look at the close up pic of the top of the old heater the hot and cold are "bent" inwards. how that happend? over time i guess the cpvc pipe as it was bending put constant pressure on the connections? i duno never seen that before.

                          So in order to re-pipe it streight and true a new heater was needed.

                          thats my guess anyway.

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                          • #14
                            Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                            im with you dunbar id rather use shark bites than glue joints cpvc scares me
                            Mike
                            Clark County Plumbing And Drain
                            www.plumbinginclarkcounty.com

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                            • #15
                              Re: And you call this, Plumbing?

                              Originally posted by Arthur96 View Post
                              look at the close up pic of the top of the old heater the hot and cold are "bent" inwards. how that happend? over time i guess the cpvc pipe as it was bending put constant pressure on the connections? i duno never seen that before.

                              So in order to re-pipe it streight and true a new heater was needed.

                              thats my guess anyway.


                              What I think is there was a hydrant cleaning one day, or a fire in the neighborhood, and no one was home.

                              Given there is a PRV on that main line, The water pressure climbed significantly in the house to extreme pressures *like 300 pounds* and given the fact that the T&P didn't open, the tank basically started expanding big time, even through the water lines in the house since CPVC allows for that given the nature of the piping. The PRV acted like a check valve and captured the pressure and wouldn't let it return to the main line...

                              and possibly the heater fired and did a maintenance cycle either while the property owner was gone/at work or this all unfolded while they was asleep. Who knows.


                              But the pressure built to extreme pressures and the only reason it didn't explode is the flue chase tieing it all together up top in the center. Gotta remember these tanks aren't thick in steel either. So envision an alumimum can in a freezer. You get the picture.

                              I've come across this more than once in my day, and that's most likely the scenario that unfolded. It couldn't really be anything else since we all know that water heater didn't come with those connections at the top of the heater bent inward. It would of never been used/installed.


                              My beef is that water line install that I see too much in new homes where this stuff is so cheap and what do you expect when the labor is cheap, the material is cheap, the idea is to slam it in and go to the next.

                              And then I come in as the cleanup machine making a killing off of all of it. It's good for the bank account, but another bad shiner for the trade as a whole, and it's always going to be this way given the way we install and provide these things as the finished product and our names are stamped all over it.

                              Can't knock the homeowner that can easily, easily put up a better job than this.
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