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Old School Bends

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  • #16
    Re: Old School Bends

    An old timer taught me how to wipe lead joints years ago. I may have done 2 joints on a waste line but never tried it on a lead water service. Every now and then we get a call to make a lead shower pan. That's always fun.

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    • #17
      Re: Old School Bends

      keep in mind that durham fittings/ san tees are tapped with a 1/4'' per foot pitch.

      running gal water pipe is a lost art not because we can't do it.

      it's because the gal pipe of today won't last 2 years.

      we still run gas and air threaded lines.

      had a house yesterday that's all brass threaded pipe.

      rick.

      look at all the ridgid tristands with all the bending shoes and bending post.

      more geared for an electrician than a plumber of today

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #18
        Re: Old School Bends

        your talking about the 65R threader. you can't do durhan with out it.
        haven't wipe a lead joint in years still do lead shower pans. Still pour tons of lead joints
        4'' 8'' 10'' 12'' 15''

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        • #19
          Re: Old School Bends

          ratz. i don't know if this is what you used but i did as a kid. my dad had a ridgid threader that had adjustable dies on face. three screw down clamps on back. the idea was to set dies, slide head on pipe and then tighten down clamps. works well if your grown up. i wasn't. i didn't get the dies pushed on tight. tighten down the clamps. now i have offset threads. to be honest i didn't know of any use for it. i was a kid. when i did it was gone. there is one on ebay "toledo pipe threader machine". it is similar but dads was a ridgid. i want to say it cut 1 1/4", 1 1/2" and 2" pipe. long time ago. breid........

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          • #20
            Re: Old School Bends

            Thats the threader, Thank you much "Where am I". I had a feeling a Chicago plumber would know this. Proberly the reason my sponsor never got around to show me, is I have always been a service plumber out in the suburbs. Never got to a job where I needed to do any drain pipe threading.
            Originally posted by where am i View Post
            your talking about the 65R threader. you can't do durhan with out it.
            haven't wipe a lead joint in years still do lead shower pans. Still pour tons of lead joints
            4'' 8'' 10'' 12'' 15''

            Breid1903, that sure sounds like what I am talking about.
            Originally posted by breid1903 View Post
            ratz. i don't know if this is what you used but i did as a kid. my dad had a ridgid threader that had adjustable dies on face. three screw down clamps on back. the idea was to set dies, slide head on pipe and then tighten down clamps. works well if your grown up. i wasn't. i didn't get the dies pushed on tight. tighten down the clamps. now i have offset threads. to be honest i didn't know of any use for it. i was a kid. when i did it was gone. there is one on ebay "toledo pipe threader machine". it is similar but dads was a ridgid. i want to say it cut 1 1/4", 1 1/2" and 2" pipe. long time ago. breid........
            I am going to quote jjbex from another site that has some great links from the Chicago Local 130 On the left just click on the plumbing companies name under the Plumbers in Action it will bring up a few job sites links which has some amazing pictures of the type of work that is done around here. I tried to get into the union 20 years ago, looking at these pics kind of makes me sad and glad that I didn't get in. Back then they where not taking on new apprentices. I am sad cause some of the amazing jobs these guys got to do. Glad cause I cant stand the idea of working on a high-rise with out any walls.

            Originally posted by jjbex View Post
            Since I am being forced to join this union local, I checked out their website. They have a section for plumbers in action, and there are some great pix of cast iron joints being made. It will probably bring a tear to Killer's eye as there are a lot of high-rise shots.


            Here is the link:

            http://www.plumberslu130ua.com/site/section/8/135
            Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
            Ron's Facebook
            A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
            Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
            Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

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            • #21
              Re: Old School Bends

              Originally posted by breid1903 View Post
              ratz. i don't know if this is what you used but i did as a kid. my dad had a ridgid threader that had adjustable dies on face. three screw down clamps on back. the idea was to set dies, slide head on pipe and then tighten down clamps. works well if your grown up. i wasn't. i didn't get the dies pushed on tight. tighten down the clamps. now i have offset threads. to be honest i didn't know of any use for it. i was a kid. when i did it was gone. there is one on ebay "toledo pipe threader machine". it is similar but dads was a ridgid. i want to say it cut 1 1/4", 1 1/2" and 2" pipe. long time ago. breid........
              that is the 65R

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              • #22
                Re: Old School Bends

                jc. i wont make any kid jokes. galvanize was all we had as a kid. my dad was to close to buck to buy copper. those bends look to be made with a bumper bender (stick it under the bumper of a truck and lift. then flip and repeat). most if not all emt benders will bend ridgd 1 size down. 3/4" emt or 1/2" ridgid. mine only go up to 1" ridgid. i used to have a set off hickey benders. they would make bends like these. i didn't like the looks of the bends so i never used them on a job. i always thought that the hand bends were kind of slipshod. just my thoughts. breid...................

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                • #23
                  Re: Old School Bends

                  Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                  I'm a lil slow so explain that one more time? Why would you want to change the pitch of the thread?
                  Originally posted by SewerRatz View Post
                  It was to create a offset with the pipe, when it screwed into the fitting it would not screw in perfectly straight. It was to make it offset with out using an offset fitting like a 22 1/2º or a 11 1/4º ells. They pitch the thread to make the pipe screw in at an angle and correct it on the other end of the pipe so a straight coupling could be used to resume the straight run.

                  I been trying to find it on google but not having any luck. I just may end up driving to the shop and finding the threaders model # to help me with my search.
                  with some of todays fittings you need this to make it come out of the fitting straight
                  my boss came to a job and said dont you have a level i said it was the fittings ,he did not believe me until i showed him a bad fitting
                  Charlie

                  My seek the peek fundraiser page
                  http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                  http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                  new work pictures 12/09
                  http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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                  • #24
                    Re: Old School Bends

                    where are you. beats me. i don't even know where i'm at. all the pictures that i have of 65-r don't have thumb screws on back. you need the thumb screws to make it work. it really is cross threading the pipe without the first threads. angle threading. breid............

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                    • #25
                      Re: Old School Bends

                      The 65 R is the one to use to cut "pitched" threads.
                      When I was helper, the old timer used to use that to put a little pitch back to the boiler on 2" or 1 1/2" fittings. Since they were cast iron (not Durham) the threads were level. Cutting the uneven thread helped condensate flow back to the boiler while the steam went out to the system.

                      We still have the 65R but do not use it much as it is a lot of work compared to using a 700 Power drive. The 65r was used when we took the # 400 (4 legged) power drive out to the job site.

                      I never saw offsets made with the 65r but he used to make offsets in M copper by heating it cherry red and carefully bending the offsets into the hot copper tubing. It saved 2- 45s and a lot of time in fitting as well as solder and flux.

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