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  • boilers

    ok, I've been a plumber for several years now, but just in the past couple of months have I really gotten going in the service side of things.

    Today I was working on a water line leak on a boiler in a nursing home, just a quick solder job, no big deal.

    after I finished I stepped back and actually looked at the boilers, and I realized.... I Have no idea what all those pipes are, or where they are going, or why. No. Frikkin. Clue.
    I could probably figure it out if I could see where the pipes were going, but on a finished building, its just a pretty copper job.

    So, can anyone recommend a good book on the topic?
    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

  • #2
    Re: boilers

    Google dan holohan he has some good resources. Just kinda curious though, didn't you get any hydronic or boiler training during school for your apprenticeship? Where I apprenticed and went to school (Northern Alberta Institute of Technology) the apprenticeship is 4 years and you attend 8 weeks each year of apprenticeship. Boiler piping is thouroughly covered as well as theory around how it all works.
    We used the "Trane Heating Manual" volume 1 hot water heating, along with many other resources supplied by the school. If you are able to get to a bookstore in a local technical school they will most likely have some student resources that you can buy and learn from.

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    • #3
      Re: boilers

      Mo, www.heatinghelp.com has just about everything you need to know about hydronic heating. Dan's book Pumping away is very good also. You can buy it off that site wich is Dan's btw.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Re: boilers

        NHmaster has a good source

        Although it takes many years of "hands on" to get to know heating systems,

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        • #5
          Re: boilers

          Thanks guys, I'll be reading up on that.

          as for my apprenticeship, it's not really like that in the south. It's something I kind of wish were different.

          I was a customer service rep for AT&T, when a friend of mine was joining the military, that left an opening with a plumber in Jacksonville North Carolina. He asked me if I wanted the job, no experience necessary. I showed up and cut pipe for my new boss for the first month, after that he let me start running pipe. That was pretty much my apprenticeship. Worked for him for 6 years, Then moved here to Missouri and had enough time in to be permitted to take my Journeyman exam. There are no classes to take, no continuing education, nothing. I've been a Journeyman for a year now, I have 3 years to go before I can take my master exam.

          Scary part? I'm taking classes right now for HVACR. In 4 years, with a letter from my current boss, who doesn't have a mechanical license, I'll be able to take my Journeyman Mechanical test. Just by virtue of the odd bit of service work i'll do on HVAC equipment. But as long as I only do HVAC work outside of the city limits, or repair things not requiring a permit It is entirely legal for me to do the work without a licensed master. so in 8 years time, with enough studying, i'll be able to take my Master Mechanical test, having never worked for a licensed Master. My current boss is only a Master Plumber/Gasfitter.



          Scary and sad I know, Thats why I read and learn as much as I can here, and take classes when and where I can.
          No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: boilers

            not here in n.y .I took a private course in long island ,then on the job( boss )training .

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            • #7
              Re: boilers

              Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
              Thanks guys, I'll be reading up on that.

              as for my apprenticeship, it's not really like that in the south. It's something I kind of wish were different.

              I was a customer service rep for AT&T, when a friend of mine was joining the military, that left an opening with a plumber in Jacksonville North Carolina. He asked me if I wanted the job, no experience necessary. I showed up and cut pipe for my new boss for the first month, after that he let me start running pipe. That was pretty much my apprenticeship. Worked for him for 6 years, Then moved here to Missouri and had enough time in to be permitted to take my Journeyman exam. There are no classes to take, no continuing education, nothing. I've been a Journeyman for a year now, I have 3 years to go before I can take my master exam.

              Scary part? I'm taking classes right now for HVACR. In 4 years, with a letter from my current boss, who doesn't have a mechanical license, I'll be able to take my Journeyman Mechanical test. Just by virtue of the odd bit of service work i'll do on HVAC equipment. But as long as I only do HVAC work outside of the city limits, or repair things not requiring a permit It is entirely legal for me to do the work without a licensed master. so in 8 years time, with enough studying, i'll be able to take my Master Mechanical test, having never worked for a licensed Master. My current boss is only a Master Plumber/Gasfitter.



              Scary and sad I know, Thats why I read and learn as much as I can here, and take classes when and where I can.
              Scary. So if I moved to the states I could write journeymen exams with no 'running hours' or college? Wow. You can't fart in the workplace in Canada with out some sort of ticket or degree.

              I heard a rumor that the US is looking at implementing a Power Engineer program modeled after Canada's in the upcoming years. It would be a step in the right direction but from what you're saying it sounds like the entire industry needs a back hand and a new body to govern the individual trades.


              Best,
              Joe

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              • #8
                Re: boilers

                Sorry i didn't even acknowledge your original question. Most boiler discharge in to a main header. From the header the heated water or steam can go to any number of end users. Could be heaters, central HVAC, hot water taps, heat tracing.... You name it. If I were you, being a service technician, I wouldn't get too wound up about it. It's the building operators job to know what everything is and where everything is going. Furthermore, if you are required to perform service on the boiler or auxiliary equipment know that it is the building operators duty to ensure the equipment is safe for you to work on...... Actually, you are in the good old USA so I'm not sure if the building operator would be held liable if something happened to you while working on the equipment.

                Best,
                Joe

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: boilers

                  every state and locality is different. North Carolina, I only needed 2 years experience to apply to take the test, with that test i'd be a Plumber, no master or Journeyman level.
                  Here in Missouri, if I don't work in one of the few cities with licensing, I don't need anything at all to call myself a plumber. just a few tools and maybe a county business license.

                  Thankfully the City I work in the most here has licensing, it isn't much but it is at least something. It's IPC, and they require 4 years as an apprentice to take the Journeyman, and 4 years after the Journeyman, you can take the Masters.

                  I'd love the State to have a license requirement, I've been doing a back and forth with a state representative trying to get something going, but really can't get one willing to endorse it right now.

                  At one point we talked about moving to Maine rather than Missouri, sometimes wish we had, but i'm not sure how my time in would have transferred over.

                  Originally posted by anthropomancy View Post
                  Scary. So if I moved to the states I could write journeymen exams with no 'running hours' or college? Wow. You can't fart in the workplace in Canada with out some sort of ticket or degree.

                  I heard a rumor that the US is looking at implementing a Power Engineer program modeled after Canada's in the upcoming years. It would be a step in the right direction but from what you're saying it sounds like the entire industry needs a back hand and a new body to govern the individual trades.


                  Best,
                  Joe
                  No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                  Comment

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