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  • Wax on tank bolts

    Several times I have broken down a tank, to replace the douglas valve, replace the tank to bowl gasket, or replace the tank to bowl bolts.

    Only to have them (bolts) leak no matter how tight I tighten them. And yes I always use new bolts/rubbers

    So I have started smearing wax first on the tank, insert bolt, tighten, and then smear wax all over the head of the bolt. And since doing this, I have never had a drip.

    And as far as I know, this is going to keep the bolt from rusting in the future.

    Anyone see anything wrong with this? I don't see the wax "melting" away from the bolt due to the temperature of the water, nor it leaving the tank and clogging up any of the holes that are around the rim.

    Some of you are going to argue that a properly installed bolt/washer combo will not leak, but my luck is not the greatest sometimes. Even then, is this not a good way to keep the bolts from rusting?

  • #2
    Re: Wax on tank bolts

    by rights, the tanks bolts are suppose to be non corrosive. typically brass.

    in the thousands and thousands of toilets i've installed, i can't remember ever using wax to seal/ lubricate a tank bolt.

    but then again i use wax for c/o plugs and compression angle stops to lube the threads.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Wax on tank bolts

      I have 2 totos in My home. I had to use rector seal on one to stop the weeking. Yes I dried and sanded the tank
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Wax on tank bolts

        Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
        I have 2 totos in My home. I had to use rector seal on one to stop the weeking. Yes I dried and sanded the tank
        Not too long ago I had the same problem with a Toto Drake. I have installed hundreds of Toto's but this one kept leaking. I replaced the tank and it still had a small leak that took two days to develop. I ended up using pipe dope on the rubber washer.

        I called Toto technical service and they were pretty much worthless. They gave me the old, "sand the tank with emery cloth" line, like I didn't already know that.

        In the end I felt that the tank bolt holes did not align with the bowl holes causing the bolt to seat at a angle.

        Some tanks are made in Vietnam and others in Mexico.
        Anyone can tear a man down, few can build one up.

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        • #5
          Re: Wax on tank bolts

          Now I wonder , if it happens ,wax or rector seal ?
          I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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          • #6
            Re: Wax on tank bolts

            First off the tank to bowl bolts are always brass in Canada...so no rusting issue. I had a few tanks leak after installation that I coud never get to stop leaking (the ceramic was not a perfectly flat surface and the rubber could not take up that uneven surface...yes I know I should have just brought the new toilets back). Instead I just used a bit of PREMIUM silicone and problem solved. Now I ALWAYS use a bit of premium silicone on the rubber seals and bolts and NEVER have any leak issues period! I don't fight it anymore...especially with these toilets coming from China and other countries with low or non existent quality control.

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            • #7
              Re: Wax on tank bolts

              I was surprised to see how many toliet parts are now only brass plated just because they are brass colored does not mean they are solid brass.

              The package has to say solid brass otherwise you never know.

              My supply house does not even stock them anymore just the cheap-o plated ones

              I order solid brass for about 3 times the cost of plated cheap-o's.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Wax on tank bolts

                I use solid brass bolts from Wolverine Brass. They come with 2 extra nuts, washers, and gaskets. I through bolt the close couple bolts to the tank, and use the extra nuts and washers to secure the tank to the bowl. Have never had a leak that way. Less chance of cracking a tank, also. You only have to snug the tank enough to secure it, you dont have to compress the washers and put stress on the tank, and bowl.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Wax on tank bolts

                  Originally posted by RealLivePlumber View Post
                  I use solid brass bolts from Wolverine Brass. They come with 2 extra nuts, washers, and gaskets. I through bolt the close couple bolts to the tank, and use the extra nuts and washers to secure the tank to the bowl. Have never had a leak that way. Less chance of cracking a tank, also. You only have to snug the tank enough to secure it, you dont have to compress the washers and put stress on the tank, and bowl.
                  Me too I never get a leak doing it this way.
                  You can lose with me, but you can't win without me!.... PPI

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                  • #10
                    Re: Wax on tank bolts

                    I honestly don't have much problem with tank leaks on new installs.

                    I do hit the bolts with a little MegaLoc for me or the next guy.

                    Toto can suck it. Not gonna' "sand a tank with emery cloth". Yeah, that's been real necessary all of these years.

                    J.C.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Wax on tank bolts

                      The only problem with tank bolts lately I've had was a Kohler. Can't remember the model but they arn't through bolted to the tank. They clip to a metal bracket on the bottom of the tank. (Memoirs?) Replaced the tank and they still weeped.

                      Of course the bathroom had hardwood flooring so it left a stain

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                      • #12
                        Re: Wax on tank bolts

                        I can't ever remember having to resort to other methods to seal a tank to bowl bolt. They always have sealed up with just the rubber gasket .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Wax on tank bolts

                          laco slic-tite. had 1 leak years ago. now i just lather them up. i'm not sanding nothing. if manufacture wants them sanded they can sand them. breid..........

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Wax on tank bolts

                            Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
                            The only problem with tank bolts lately I've had was a Kohler. Can't remember the model but they arn't through bolted to the tank. They clip to a metal bracket on the bottom of the tank. (Memoirs?) Replaced the tank and they still weeped.

                            Of course the bathroom had hardwood flooring so it left a stain
                            I believe the toilet you are talking about is the Cimmaron. I have had a couple of issues with this toilet, but it was not the mounting plate or the bolts, but the tank/bowl seal. A little bit of silicone and everything worked like new.
                            Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Wax on tank bolts

                              Don't you just hate to get those faux brass bolts in a new tank.It is also very frustrating to get copper-plated steel plates for securing copper tubing stubs in between the studs.I hate those chrome-plated steel pipe flanges.Who are they kidding when they tell you it is ok to slide those over copper tubing?!!! Just add urine and watch it dissolve!
                              Another gripe are the so-called di-electric unions.These are zinc-plated trash and last about five years because of the rust issues.
                              I have been making my own with a brass NPT x 7/8" compression fitting threaded into a di-electric-fiber-inseted galvanized coupling.They last many years.
                              I have talked with all of the "usual suspect engineers" at the factories about these issues but only get the "deer in the headlight" looks!!!
                              Last edited by sunworksco; 11-06-2009, 02:58 PM.

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