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Giving up work (for good reason)

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  • #31
    Re: Giving up work (for good reason)

    Originally posted by mr bonds View Post
    here where we are the city has us let them know if the pressure is too high then they will install a prv plus it is code to have a cold water pressure relief on the cold side of the water heater instead of the thermal expansion tank i don't agree but it is the code in our county
    I agree with dunbar 100% period and paragraphed, if i can't do my job properly i'll flip hamburgers people always find a way around waivers

    Thanks, and I still stand by my sentiment that I don't need the work to take a chance like that.

    I can sit here and probably come up with a few since this thread was created but it all falls in line with the one I dumped like a bowel movement.

    People more than ever at this point are wanting to cut corners...I'm not doing anything I regret down the road when it comes to workmanship and potential disasters with my name all over it.


    Insurance companies too easily cave in and say PAY IT, PAY IT, PAID and don't bother fighting. Then you have to value your personal time, and if the fight is worth it.

    Being right doesn't always imply you win.
    Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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    • #32
      Re: Giving up work (for good reason)

      19 people voted that it was the right thing.


      The rest of you who put dollars in front of decision making, thanks for the ride up the ladder of awareness of what the majority of us do to protect this trade and the customers we work for.

      Obviously we as plumbers are far from being created equal. Sad that is.
      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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      • #33
        Re: Giving up work (for good reason)

        When I had my plumbing company in Ohio and now working in Florida having a client sign a waiver form even though the client has decided against the proper action is not a valid waiver form to protect me if something goes wrong.You are admiting that it should not have been installed in this manner and still installed it knowing what could happen. I would check first with a lawyer in your state for confirmation and have them draw a waiver form that is a legal binding contract for doing something that is not correct.

        I tip my hat to Dunbar for standing firm. I do think there is a different way to discuss the issue with the client.Especially knowing the emotional state that the client has found in her life. I understand how she wants to change the look of the home and get rid of reminders of her husband. I also know major decisions made during the time of stress tend to come back and bite those involved.

        I see time has passed since this was published anything different happen with this call?

        I have walked from clients who wanted work done cheaply and not to codes or the product will not resolve the issue.

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