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  • discovered trick

    i am sure this is not new but i just discovered it and thought i would share it. i am more of an electrician than i am a plumber. a trick that was shown to me some yrs ago to deburr the inside of conduit after cutting is to take a pair of channellocks without the grips, open the jaws all the way and insert the tips of the handles into the end of the conduit and turn. regular size channellocks dont fit as well in 1/2 copper. i have a pair of craftsman ignition pliers (mini channellocks) that i have removed the grips from. these work great in copper. of course it is not as critical in copper to deburr, it does smooth and clean the inner edge which does help making a good joint. the blades on the back of most tubing cutters can be a pain and i have never found them to be very effective. just a little trick i thought id share
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    I am not an electrician, but do use conduit in the fire suppressions systems we install. Instead of cutting all the way through conduit, cut just enough that you can force the conduit over your knee, a counter, the ladder and break the conduit. Don't cut enough, the conduit will bend, cut too much and you will still have to ream the inside. But when you learn to cut to the proper depth, it is faster and you don't need to spend time reaming the conduit.

    Douglas Hicks
    General Fire Equipment Co of Eastern Oregon, Inc

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    • #3
      "not as critical in copper to debur" Quite wrong. The ridge left in the copper will cause the water to "tumble", and at higher velocity will erode the piping materials downstream of the joint to a point that it will leak. People think the copper has failed, But actually, the installer is the one to blame.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by The Pipe Dope:
        "not as critical in copper to debur" Quite wrong. The ridge left in the copper will cause the water to "tumble", and at higher velocity will erode the piping materials downstream of the joint to a point that it will leak. People think the copper has failed, But actually, the installer is the one to blame.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by The Pipe Dope:
          "not as critical in copper to debur" Quite wrong. The ridge left in the copper will cause the water to "tumble", and at higher velocity will erode the piping materials downstream of the joint to a point that it will leak. People think the copper has failed, But actually, the installer is the one to blame.
          Im sure glad you added that because I would if you didn't. GOOD JOB

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