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  • Tunneling

    This is in oklahoma.
    Already talked to the inspector, and he said they allow tunneling.
    Not in a crawlspace, talking about tunneling under a slab to replace 10 feet of 3 inch cast iron. The homeowner does not want to penetrate the slab and have to pay me for the repair, then have to get tile work done, so this is the other option. Tunnel under the slab from outside.

    Is there any codes anywhere as to what has to go back in? We are going to use what we call flowable fill. Kinda a real soupy concrete mix from what I understand.

    But even the inspector was not sure as to any real codes, as to what has to go in as backfill.

    Obviously, it has to support the foundation. Anyone familiar with this technique? They use it in texas ALOT. But here, it's not only expensive, but kinda unheard of.

  • #2
    Re: Tunneling

    I've put in pipe with flowable fill. I have no idea as to what kind of foundation it will provide for the slab. Get an engineer or make them sign a waiver where you are not responsible for the integrity of the foundation/building.

    AND FLOWABLE FILL WILL FLOAT THE PIPE. PVC AND ABS. Better make sure it is staked down on the grade you want throughout.

    And no matter what, common sense and safety. Don't put yourself or anyone in a position to get hurt.

    Good luck.

    J.C.

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    • #3
      Re: Tunneling

      Originally posted by Ninjaskillz View Post
      This is in oklahoma.
      Already talked to the inspector, and he said they allow tunneling.
      Not in a crawlspace, talking about tunneling under a slab to replace 10 feet of 3 inch cast iron. The homeowner does not want to penetrate the slab and have to pay me for the repair, then have to get tile work done, so this is the other option. Tunnel under the slab from outside.

      Is there any codes anywhere as to what has to go back in? We are going to use what we call flowable fill. Kinda a real soupy concrete mix from what I understand.

      But even the inspector was not sure as to any real codes, as to what has to go in as backfill.

      Obviously, it has to support the foundation. Anyone familiar with this technique? They use it in texas ALOT. But here, it's not only expensive, but kinda unheard of.
      Tunneling is approved under the IPC but not under the UPC so you can do it but you have to be very careful. I represented a concrete pumper once who was hired by the plumber to pump slurry back into the tunnel when they were done. The plumbers insurance went BK so it was all on the pumper. The plumbers did not tie the pipe down properly so it moved during the pumping and ended up with a bunch of bellies. In addition, the plumber was not watching inside the house and had the pumper just pump under normal pressure. The hydraulic lift of the slurry lifted the kitchen floor 18" at the tunnel location and destroyed the cabinets and counter top.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Tunneling

        Tunneling 10' through the foundation and under the slab sounds like a real pain in the A$$ just to repair or replace a section of 3" pipe. what about the footer? are you going to be under it as well? You could be getting your self into a real mess. Why dont you just camera to find the bad spot and do a epoxy pipe lining patch
        ________
        Chevrolet Ssr Specifications
        Last edited by TOPDAWG; 02-24-2011, 04:28 PM.
        Mike

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        • #5
          Re: Tunneling

          Sounds like new tile may be cheaper, and you will be able to do a much better job, with less liability issues. 10ft don't sound like much tile, as compared to messing with a foundation.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Tunneling

            As a non Plumber I have to ask. Can you actually hand dig under a slab, set and grade the pipe, insure the pipe will not move, and insure the foundation will not fail for a cheaper price than cutting the slab?

            I understand that sometimes tunneling may be the way to go in some extenuating situations (EX: hospital main entrance) but this just sounds like a price issue.

            I would think in the end, Tunneling would be much more expensive????

            You also may want to check with your insurance Co. and OSHA
            INSIGHT PIPE is now Maine Drain Serving most of ME with no charge for travel! 207-431-6232 is nolonger a working # our NEW # is 207-355-1476
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            • #7
              Re: Tunneling

              I would take a look at this post, http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...ht=boring+pipe.
              I think this is the machine Rick used at least it is very similar, http://www.trenchlessamerica.com/hydro_bore.html

              and there is a tool called a borzit http://www.borzit.com/ and very similar tool called borit http://www.borit.com/
              (the borzit has better machined fittings, not just pipe fittings, also has larger bits.)
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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              • #8
                Re: Tunneling

                bhd, once again you've impressed me with your knowledge and ability to remember the post

                that is the method i would also use. or possibly the trenchless pipe bursting.

                the good old days of getting dirty hands

                rick.
                phoebe it is

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Tunneling

                  I have dug out a few waterlines but I would not do a sewer line if you try it stay away from pumping concrete if you can help it.

                  Contact a foundation repair company that uses "Mud Jacking" and have the void Mud Jacked.

                  All that being said, A dig out and repair is not cheaper ( the labor alone will eat any percieved savings) then a traditional cut and dig unless the tile is made of gold...lol.

                  This is what Homeowners insurance is for
                  Last edited by OkieBill; 01-04-2010, 09:49 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Tunneling

                    Originally posted by Ninjaskillz View Post
                    This is in oklahoma.
                    Already talked to the inspector, and he said they allow tunneling.
                    Not in a crawlspace, talking about tunneling under a slab to replace 10 feet of 3 inch cast iron. The homeowner does not want to penetrate the slab and have to pay me for the repair, then have to get tile work done, so this is the other option. Tunnel under the slab from outside.

                    Is there any codes anywhere as to what has to go back in? We are going to use what we call flowable fill. Kinda a real soupy concrete mix from what I understand.

                    But even the inspector was not sure as to any real codes, as to what has to go in as backfill.

                    Obviously, it has to support the foundation. Anyone familiar with this technique? They use it in texas ALOT. But here, it's not only expensive, but kinda unheard of.
                    I use pump and fly ash concrete. It's like teflon gets in all voids. Ask a pumper about it.
                    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Tunneling

                      My life is not worth completing a job to save someone some money.
                      Buy cheap, buy twice.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Tunneling

                        All very good points.

                        I am very excited about doing a tunnel job.
                        Sure there are other ways. Better? Maybe. But this is the option we are looking into.

                        Sometimes you get a customer that wants something done.
                        And they want it a certain way.
                        How much do you want to spend?
                        She wants to spend alot.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Tunneling

                          Originally posted by Ninjaskillz View Post
                          Sometimes you get a customer that wants something done.
                          And they want it a certain way.
                          How much do you want to spend?
                          She wants to spend alot.
                          I have no problem with keeping these kinds of clients happy.

                          Mick

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Tunneling

                            Just remember they value their house more than you.

                            That means if you die, oh well. If you screw up, I'm sure they have more than enough money to sue you for making a mistake on their precious house.

                            Could you please explain why you are "excited" about a tunneling? Have you done it before?
                            Anyone can tear a man down, few can build one up.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Tunneling

                              He is excited because he has only 8yrs experience. In other words, his back, arms, hands, legs, and knees, don't ache yet. This is just good exercise for him.
                              I do wish him the best of luck, but I would never do that job like that. Every crack in floor, walls, or ceiling from here out will be his fault.

                              I also find it amazing that the customer wants to spend alot, but doesn't want to replace tile floor.
                              Last edited by Don the plumber; 01-06-2010, 06:42 AM.

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