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  • Dunbar's photo album

    Thank's Dunbar. Enjoyed the show. It all looks very neat and professional. I always take interest in the different way work, in all the trades, vary by region. Seems odd to see sink
    and toilet risers with no air chambers. Do You have washing machine,dishwasher bang
    without them. If so what's Your fix? Soix City spring loaded ones? Thanks Tool
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

  • #2
    Re: Dunbar's photo album

    Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
    Thank's Dunbar. Enjoyed the show. It all looks very neat and professional. I always take interest in the different way work, in all the trades, vary by region. Seems odd to see sink
    and toilet risers with no air chambers. Do You have washing machine,dishwasher bang
    without them. If so what's Your fix? Soix City spring loaded ones? Thanks Tool

    None of the above.


    If I'm part of the "fix" equation, my goal is to get customers to commit to resolving the water pressure issue so those add on devices aren't required.

    Years ago in new construction, I used to turn off tees on my bath groups and install 4-10" chambers but those will always eventually fill up, lose their value or effectiveness. I have some of them that are years old, had them in an odd lot I bought off ebay years ago. Never used them though.
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    • #3
      Re: Dunbar's photo album

      When I attended plumbing school in 1979 we had an air chamber in class. It was constructed of pyrex glass and was piped to the cold potable water supply of the school but had an isolation valve, and a drain valve at the bottom. The first day of class the valve was opened and the air chamber was filled with water. I forget exactly, but the air chamber filled up a little more than halfway. The dimensions of the air chamber were 2" in diameter, and 60" long. (A big one, it was located at the water meter) At that time in the city of St. Paul, the city code required the installation of these air chambers. (I believe it was a code remnant from the old days when the City water department used reciprocating pumps instead of centrifical pumps.)

      We kept track of the air/water mixture. Every day there was slighly less air in the chamber. In about six weeks the air chamber was completely water logged. Once the air chamber is waterlogged it's useless. Assuming the air diffuses into water the same in all potable water systems the risers in walls behind sinks and toilets are only functional for a few weeks after the system happens to be drained.
      Time flies like an arrow.

      Fruit flies like a banana.

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      • #4
        Re: Dunbar's photo album

        Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
        When I attended plumbing school in 1979 we had an air chamber in class. It was constructed of pyrex glass and was piped to the cold potable water supply of the school but had an isolation valve, and a drain valve at the bottom. The first day of class the valve was opened and the air chamber was filled with water. I forget exactly, but the air chamber filled up a little more than halfway. The dimensions of the air chamber were 2" in diameter, and 60" long. (A big one, it was located at the water meter) At that time in the city of St. Paul, the city code required the installation of these air chambers. (I believe it was a code remnant from the old days when the City water department used reciprocating pumps instead of centrifical pumps.)

        We kept track of the air/water mixture. Every day there was slighly less air in the chamber. In about six weeks the air chamber was completely water logged. Once the air chamber is waterlogged it's useless. Assuming the air diffuses into water the same in all potable water systems the risers in walls behind sinks and toilets are only functional for a few weeks after the system happens to be drained.
        You will install air chambers in S.F. IT'S CODE HERE
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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        • #5
          Re: Dunbar's photo album

          Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
          You will install air chambers in S.F. IT'S CODE HERE


          The air or piston type? I can see the piston type working for its application with years of use.

          But wouldn't a thermal expansion tank actually serve the same "cushion" ?
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          • #6
            Re: Dunbar's photo album

            Air chambers. 1/2"- 12" long, on 3/4"- 18" tall. I'm thinking the same thing on Ex. tank.
            Why not up size tank to serve the system better
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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