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  • Air in water lines...

    I have a job where the customer is on a well, has pressure tank,Iron Curtain, and water softner. All of the water is softened and iron free in the house. It is a 2 story house with plumbing on all levels. They have 2 faucets that spit air occasionally. Both faucets are on the first floor, and both are the hot side only that spit air, the rest of the house is fine.
    Anyone with any thoughts or insight?

  • #2
    Re: Air in water lines...

    I have dissolved iron in my well water, even with the filter you can get a build up on the bottom of the hot water tank. The build up act as an insulator and my cause the water to boil occasionally. When the water boils it will introduce air to the hot water system, I would bet the two faucets spitting air are the first two after the branch going to the first floor

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    • #3
      Re: Air in water lines...

      The expansion tank may be leaking and putting air in the system or you may have a slight suction line leak?? Is it a jet pump or a submersible??
      Jim

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      • #4
        Re: Air in water lines...

        Some iron filters draw air through a fitting between the pump and pressure tank, then have an air unloader. (That's how it gets the iron out: it holds it in suspension while filtering and then takes it back out of suspension by removing the air.) I could be that the air unloader is sending "fizzy" (aerated) water into the water heater, where it has time to settle into a bubble at the top of the water heater. In effect, the water heater tank is performing the function that the air unloader should be doing. Easy to check: while the pump is running, hold your finger against the air fitting and you should feel suction. Then (again, while the pump is running) check the overflow tube at the top of the air unloader tank. It should be pushing air. I bet it isn't.

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        • #5
          Re: Air in water lines...

          I have "city Water" Customers with air ...

          No one knows why

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          • #6
            Re: Air in water lines...

            I think folks with city water that experience air is for the same reason as noted above, but coming from a different source. The water coming into the home from the city main can also be aerated, and it sits in the water heater and rises to the top. The next time a faucet is opened it sputters out. Now, exactly WHY there is aerated water coming through the lines is a matter of debate. I have some ideas.

            (If you ever have a chance to work on a home with an aeration-type iron filter, try this little trick: fill a clear glass with water. You'll see it looks white, which is the air. In just under a minute, you'll see the water "clear" as the air rises to the surface. In a closed system, it also seeks its way to the top, then comes out the faucets. While possibly annoying to the customer,there isn't anything wrong with it; "fixing" it can get expensive.)

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            • #7
              Re: Air in water lines...

              The two faucets are the first that come off the main, but why would the air not show up at the 2nd floor fixtures first? The well pump is a submersible. If the air is coming from the Iron Curtain why would it not show up on the cold water line?

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              • #8
                Re: Air in water lines...

                I'm thinking that the aerated water needs someplace to settle; it's settling in the water heater, which has about twenty or so times more area than the rest of the house piping combined. Then, when you have a bubble at the top of the water heater, it will come out of the nearest hot faucet, on the first floor. I'll just bet, though, that if you were to isolate the first floor faucets, eventually you'll get air on the second floor, too.

                I forgot to ask: is there a recirc line on the water heater?

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                • #9
                  Re: Air in water lines...

                  No recirc line on the house.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Air in water lines...

                    Originally posted by NoeEttica View Post
                    I have "city Water" Customers with air ...

                    No one knows why
                    I have seen were on larger buildings with booster pumps that are 3 phase when the pump is spining backwards in valut and if sparky doesnt check and just conects and turns on and checks if presure goes up he thinks everything cool but if pump is spining backwards it airraites the water causeing it to look fizzy like soda water till the bubals go down
                    SMELLS LIKE $$$$$$ TO ME

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                    • #11
                      Re: Air in water lines...

                      we had a similar problem on city water in town, we took a old pressure tank that was not bladered unit, and piped in the side and out on the bottom and a valve on top and put that on the incoming line and the air would get trapped in the tank and ever few months they would release the air out the valve as it filled with air, (when the town put in the new water tower storage tank the problem went away), for about 25 years that how we dealt with that problem,
                      this was in a church, and there was water fountain that would be used and when the air pocket would come it would shoot water up over the door and onto to the people that were entering or exiting the auditorium, (since that was normally the only time the water fountain was used,),
                      IN one way it was kinda funny, most of the time the spurt of water would hit right were the preacher would stand after the service.
                      Last edited by BHD; 03-27-2010, 10:46 AM.
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                      • #12
                        Re: Air in water lines...

                        Water heaters with an anode rod will create what I call gassing. With a magnesium rod in the water heater it sometimes can and often does create air bubbles. With a water softner the mag rod and the softner are trying to do the same thing and will fight one another.Try an aluminum rod in the heater and see if that works. I/we get 3-4 water heaters a year that create this issue and each one has been on a water softner.We have all of our techs change the rods when we installl a water heater when conditioning equipment is there.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Air in water lines...

                          Originally posted by wbrooks View Post
                          The build up act as an insulator and my cause the water to boil occasionally. When the water boils it will introduce air to the hot water system,
                          Water flashing to steam in a water heater is still H20 and not air. When the steam loses energy to the cooler surrounding hot water it will return to the state of water again. (no air is introduced).
                          Time flies like an arrow.

                          Fruit flies like a banana.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Air in water lines...

                            Something else you might want to check out is wether you have some natural gas in your water. Being on a well, it is rare but more common than most think for gas to be entrained in the well water and come out at the faucets the way you describe.
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6G6Ap-mF0k
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bekzB...eature=related

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