Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

air distribution

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • air distribution

    Hi,
    I have just purchased a 7hp 150 PSI 60 gallon compressor and would like some tips on the best way to set up the distribution. My son and I will be using it to restore a car in our garage...sanding, painting, power tools, sandblaster, etc. We will only be using one tool at a time so a distribution line feeder system with multiple connections want be necessary. I just want to use it the most efficient and safest way possible so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  • #2
    I did use 1" pvc plastic pipe in one shop, but I have heard it is not the best, as if it does blow it will blow shrapnel around, and since it is plastic it can be damaged easily,

    so I would not recommend pvc, pipe,

    but I would recommend 3/4' to 1" pipe, steel galvanized pipe, and would probably use drop legs under the outlets and use quick connectors, (a capped nipple 4 or so inches, that extends down below the outlet to collect water and crap in the pipe)

    I may consider drains on the drop legs,

    I used a small piece of rubber air hose to go from the compressor tank to the air line distribution piping,

    I attached to the wall using conduit clamps,

    I really don't know what else to add as to figure out where you want the outlets and figure the lay out and install it,

    I would put a filter dryer in at the compressor, but would put quick fittings on a lubricator and move that to where you would want to use the air tool, If you mount the oiler at the compressor and want dry oilers air in painting, tire filling etc. you will have to blow a lot of air through the system to even remove the oil to a so so situation (like try a years worth), mark your air hoses as to one that is used with air tools that need oil and dry hoses, it will save you big mess later on,

    DRAIN THE TANK ON REGULAR TIME TABLE, WEEKLY OR MORE OFTEN. make a chart and mark it off, it will save the tank, (if you have used it a lot sand blasting or a lot of air, drain it that day, especially if you live in a high humidity, area,

    remove the plug put in a elbow and a nipple and a quarter turn ball vale on the drain that you can get to easily, it will help you drain it the way you should, often and daily, or at lest weekly, if you have to remove the plug and drain
    (first it is dangerous if you do not have the tank total depressurized) and you only do it once or twice because of the hassle.

    hope that helps,
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

    Comment


    • #3
      BHD IS 100% CORRECT. VERY GOOD SUGGESTIONS.
      I WOULD ALSO RECOMMEND COPPER INSTEAD OF GAL. PIPE. IT WILL BE FREE OF CORROSION AND WILL PROBABLY BE FASTER TO INSTALL AS YOU DON'T HAVE TO THREAD. DON'T WORRY ABOUT PRESSURE AS THE TUBING AND SOLDER JOINTS CAN HANDLE MORE PRESSURE THAN ANY OTHER COMPONANT IN THE SYSTEM.
      YOU ALSO MENTIONED JUST 1 REMOTE OUTLET. YOU CAN SAVE ALOT OF LABOR ON RUNNING PIPE IF YOU PURCHASE AN OVERSIZED AIR HOSE, 3/4'' AS USED FOR A JACK HAMMER. IT WILL GO IN FAST AND IS LARGE ENOUGH TO SUPPLY ALL THE AIR YOU CAN USE. A GOOD IDEA IS TO BUILD A MULTI TAP MANIFOLD AT THE COMPRESSOR END AND TERMINATION END. YOU COULD ALSO INSTALL THE PRESSURE REGULATOR AT THE FAR END TO CUT DOWN ON ANY PRESSURE, OR DRAW LOSS. GOOD PLACE FOR YOUR OILER TO ATTACH TO. 1 PORT AT HIGH PRESSURE, 1 @ REGULATED NO OIL, AND 1 @ REGULATED WITH OIL.
      EITHER WAY YOU CAN'T GO WRONG WITH BHD OR MY SUGGESTIONS.
      GOOD LUCK RICK.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes, use copper (3/4 type L would be my choice for a home shop). Using the short length of air hose to connect your compressor to your line is a good move. The hose will act as a vibration isolator and also with a quick connect allow you to unplug the compressor and take it on the road for remote jobs easily.

        As others stated keep your lines free of oil, place your oilers as close to the tool as practical and dedicate a hose or two to oil use only. At work we use color-coded hoses to help avoiding mixed use, you could do the same by marking the ends of your hoses with different color electrical tape, maybe Orange for OIL and Green for CLEAN air.

        If your main travels overhead then take your drops off the top of the main. Don't place a tee in the line with the bull* looking down, any condensation or debris will follow right down to your tools. [*What's the bull? It's the side outlet of a Tee.]

        At the bottom of each drop install a drip leg with blowdown valve and have your air port come off the side instead of the bottom. This will avoid carrying over any debris that should get in your lines out into your tools where it can damage air motors or spoil a finish if spraying. I'd place at least one drop on each wall to avoid having long hoses laying on the floor, these will be trip hazards.

        +----/ /--- air header ----- from compressor
        |
        ~
        |
        |
        +--V-- (regulated air port)
        |
        | - drip leg (6" min, same size as drop line)
        |
        X+ (blowdown valve)
        |

        Run near full pressure through the lines (I keep mine at 100 PSI minimum) and reduce at point of use. I also did the mod to move the drain valve out from under the tank, makes it so much easier to do that you will not cuss every time trying to reach the petcock that most put on their tanks. I put a 90 on the end to direct the airflow down so I don't have to worry about being blasted by the condensation and debris when I blow the tank down and maybe catching a piece of dirt in the eye.

        Having worked at a electric generating station with literally miles of (mostly welded) steel air lines (sized from 4" on down) I can tell you down the road you will be wishing you put in copper as they do now. We started having trouble with rust and scale only 5 years after the system went in service. They are now looking into replacing the compressors due to age and the piping because of the problems the scale and rust create for all the pneumatic equipment. I estimate the cost will be over $1M, maybe $1.5M, it is a large system, three 400+ HP compressors in a lead-lag setup with an extensive control system, vibration montoring, redundant backups, cascaded driers, etc.

        Comment

        Working...
        X