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  • Steam?

    Almost no residential steam or boilers here.

    What are some of the typical pressures of steam systems?

    What types of pipe?

    Thanks.

    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: Steam?

    Not many residential ones left here. Most have been abandoned for forced air or converted to hot water systems.

    Iron pipe mostly with cast iron fittings. Not many operate over 3 psi.

    Fast and efficient heat but needs lots of baby sitting.

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    • #3
      Re: Steam?

      <1 up to 5 tops. most i ever worked with was 72 on a lumber mill. the lower the pressure the better. breid................

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      • #4
        Re: Steam?

        Usually large diameter steel weld pipe. Supply and return lines from heat exchangers and chillers. You'll find it most being installed in industrial applications, and institutional.
        Proud To Be Union!!

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        • #5
          Re: Steam?

          Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
          Almost no residential steam or boilers here.

          What are some of the typical pressures of steam systems?

          What types of pipe?

          Thanks.

          J.C.
          Operating pressures depend on how big your system is and what it is powering. If its just heating then lower power boilers, old dry cleaning outfits used to run high pressure boilers for steam to their ironing stations and presses, don't know how much of that goes on with todays fabrics but I guess there is still some demand.

          Power boilers can run up to 1000 PSIG or more. Take a nuclear boiler (or reactor as they are commonly called) for instance, they can operate at better than 1000 PSIG making steam to turn the turbine. Conventional power boilers (coal, oil, or gas fired) also run very high pressures to turn their turbines and spin the generator.

          Another use (here on the east coast anyway) is in cities that have central power stations. They can supply heating steam, chilled water, and/or hot water to buildings through a distribution network of piping that runs under the streets. ConEd in New York City and other utilities in Philadelphia, Boston and other up and down the coast do this too. Atlantic City Electric (ACE) used to do this in Atlantic city to many of the huge old hotels that lined the boardwalk. Many of those hotels were as big as those that stand in their place today, with over 4000 guest rooms, indoor fresh AND salt water swimming pools, running salt water baths in the guest rooms, and many more luxuries that would rival or surpass todays hotels. The steam pipes ran down Pacific Avenue from their electric generating station on the island which was located about where the new convention center is now. When I was a second year apprentice they shut that plant down. And right next door was a big commercial laundry that got their steam from ACE. We had to install a new boiler to replace what they got from ACE for heating water and for the presses, etc. We installed the biggest oil-fired package boiler that Cleaver-Brooks made at the time (1978). I remember that was where I learned to cut gauge glass using a triangular file to score the OD.
          Last edited by Bob D.; 05-09-2010, 10:05 PM.
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          • #6
            Re: Steam?

            I used to work on commercial steam boilers when I used to work for a pump company, that was long ago.

            Lots of F&T Steam traps, cage units and stubborn scaled black pipe, oh and also lots of clogged strainers and off course condensate tanks, vacuum pumps. etc

            Steam is good stuff, way better then dry heat in my opinion
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            • #7
              Re: Steam?

              we still have a lot of steam in big old farm houses and they run no more then 3psi
              now we have a lot of commercial boilers and they can run up to or more then 200psi .some places the steam travels 1mi under ground to get to a building
              Charlie

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              • #8
                Re: Steam?

                I babysat 2 150HP Continental fire tube boilers and 5 25ton Arkla Servel steam absorption chillers for 15 years.

                Spent many a hot days keeping the tempermental Arklas running.

                Good times

                You asked about piping and pressure.

                125PSIG & lots of SCH 80.
                Last edited by James P; 05-10-2010, 10:12 AM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Steam?

                  We have 150 psi, 80 psi, and 5 psi in the plant all coming from the powerhouse. The 150 psi is delivered to only one area and it is in a 6" welded pipe. The 80 pound steam runs the heat and some small turbine powered pumps, 4" welded mains with 2" drops, heaters are 1" threaded with traps, and strainers. The 5 pound steam runs a few small things and is just a 2" welded main. We use teflon tape, and never seez on all our threaded steam connections, or they will never come apart.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Steam?

                    Originally posted by TozziWelding View Post
                    We have 150 psi, 80 psi, and 5 psi in the plant all coming from the powerhouse. The 150 psi is delivered to only one area and it is in a 6" welded pipe. The 80 pound steam runs the heat and some small turbine powered pumps, 4" welded mains with 2" drops, heaters are 1" threaded with traps, and strainers. The 5 pound steam runs a few small things and is just a 2" welded main. We use teflon tape, and never seez on all our threaded steam connections, or they will never come apart.
                    This the power house on the Cape Cod Canal ? I hear huge Lobsters Hang out past the discarge grate
                    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                    • #11
                      Re: Steam?

                      Nope the powerhouse that feeds the plant I work at up in Peabody.

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