Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Heating system for shed Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Heating system for shed

    Heyo. Got a customer who expressed interest in having in-floor heating system in his shed...one zone obviously. He doesn't want a $1800 electric boiler out there, so I was thinking a 40gal electric HWT piped to a supply and return manifold. Anyone have any success or failure doing something like this? Any other suggestions?

  • #2
    Re: Heating system for shed

    It will cost him so much to operate it that he will abandon it after the first season.
    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Heating system for shed

      have you seen the radiant electric systems?

      you can set them for a floor temp, or air temp

      I think suntouch is the one that is popular around here

      those, and an electric baseboard, or radiator might be plenty assuming there is sufficient power available

      in most places, electricity is the most expensive BTU money can buy

      Where i'm from, code prohibits the use of a water heater for space heating unless the manufacturer lists it for space heating use

      will the shed be heated full-time, or just when occupied?

      how warm will it need to be inside?

      how well is the structure insulated?

      how large is the structure?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Heating system for shed

        Originally posted by Asperger View Post
        Heyo. Got a customer who expressed interest in having in-floor heating system in his shed...one zone obviously. He doesn't want a $1800 electric boiler out there, so I was thinking a 40gal electric HWT piped to a supply and return manifold. Anyone have any success or failure doing something like this? Any other suggestions?
        You need to do a heat loss first and determine how many BTU's are required. That then determines the amount of tube, size, spacing, GPM based on design preferences

        A standard 40g electric, non-simutainious element operation is 4500 watts so that only produces about 15,000 BTU's

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Heating system for shed

          We had a customer who installed his own pipe for radiant heat for his basement. We watched him install the pipe, and me and pop both said to each other "he didn't use enough pipe". Now this was 7 years ago, and to this day, he keeps trying to get us to install an electric water heater to do the job, and we keep declining. We explained to him that the WH wouldn't be able to keep up with it.

          We can't use a power vent because of vent distance and space.

          There are other avenues you can explore.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Heating system for shed

            we had one install his own piping, with no insulation under the pour, his electric water heater about bled him dry.
            No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Heating system for shed

              You have to do the calculations and see if a 4500 watt heater will do the job. It might be fine. A 4500 watt heater will produce 15360 BTU's. What is the heat loss in BTU's?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Heating system for shed

                Originally posted by Birddoggiest View Post
                You have to do the calculations and see if a 4500 watt heater will do the job. It might be fine. A 4500 watt heater will produce 15360 BTU's. What is the heat loss in BTU's?
                That kinda sounds familiar huh

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Heating system for shed

                  Originally posted by Lee H View Post
                  You need to do a heat loss first and determine how many BTU's are required. That then determines the amount of tube, size, spacing, GPM based on design preferences

                  A standard 40g electric, non-simutainious element operation is 4500 watts so that only produces about 15,000 BTU's
                  That does sound familiar, I missed that!

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X