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When Do you Pull a Permit ?

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  • When Do you Pull a Permit ?

    I am out of Michigan but this is for anyone to comment on. I am asking you when do you pull permits? I always do whenever I am installing new "additional fixtures" or new construction. Water Heaters , boilers, furnaces, the obvious stuff. But do you have to when you repair a frozen/split pipe ? Replace a disposal that went bad? Change a Water closet ? Doing repairs on existing homes ? We have all seen the differences from city to city on their permits, some have more options/prices than others. Thanks

  • #2
    Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

    I pull permits when and where they are required. No ifs ands or butts.
    Ron Hasil Lic #058-160417
    A-Archer Sewer & Plumbing specializing in:
    Tankless Water Heaters | Drain and Sewer Cleaning
    Sump and Ejector Pumps | Backflow RPZ Testing

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    • #3
      Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

      I plead the 5th on this one

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      • #4
        Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

        I am in the middle on this one .

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        • #5
          Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

          What's a permit?

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          • #6
            Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

            Toilet handles and aerators.

            J.C.

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            • #7
              Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

              we're supposed to pull a permit for anything before the shutoffs or after the trap. the permit is $100.

              I'll plead the fifth on the frequency of doing this.
              No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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              • #8
                Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

                In the 8+ counties I work in Michigan, we have the select few rogue inspectors or building inspection departments that are making their own rules. I know that we are adopting the latest code requirements but the law part is not changing much if at all. As long as you were not adding to the plumbing system in any way there was no legal need to pull a permit. As you know Michigan has alot of foreclosed homes, and they sometimes have issues related to neglect. Cities (some) are requiring full permits for all mech. trades and holding the C of O. over their heads as leverage. Requiring you to do full updates on everything to new codes. It is costing new investors alot of money to what they thought was a good deal. In our state it is illegal for an inspector to practice the plumbing trade in any way ( sales, work, buisness ownership) for conflict of interest. However we have 2 cities in particular that are offering services guaranteed to pass inspection to "help keep" the project going forward for the better of the community and of course the project owner. Fees are silly but the 6 or so trips for the inspector to inspect and find more that needs to be done is getting ridiculous . Mind you not 1 fixture has been touched or replaced.

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                • #9
                  Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

                  Here, you need to apply for a permit to apply for a permit so it makes actually pulling the permit a bit of a condundrum that the city council has been trying to put on the agenda to make an agenda
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Re: When Do you Pull a Permit ?

                    Never; I'm not liscensed.

                    While the vast majority of my work is drain cleaning, I'll do minor plumbing repair. My guidline there, right or wrong, is I refer them to a plumber if it's in a wall, and even if it's exposed then only if it's a drain line. I will have nothing to do with supply lines at all beyond replacing a stop or faucet or disposer or toilet, though I have repaired a few pinholes in an exposed hot water recirc line; I was there, I'm going to bill for driving over, I might as well fix it for their $.

                    This is where I've drawn the line. Not really what you asked, but I've often wonderered if others who've put in the time for the liscence would agree with what I do. Most liscenced guys around here have traditionally had enough on their plate (though it's not so true lately) that it's a pain in their butt to replace a faucet when they've got a few new houses lined up, and no-one would pull a permit for a faucet.

                    Services, on the other hand, I'll do; here that is an excavator, not a plumber, and I've put the insurance and septic installer's liscence in place to let me dig.
                    Last edited by Ace Sewer; 08-25-2010, 01:47 AM.
                    This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

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