Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Talk with your kids about their future

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Talk with your kids about their future

    I robbed this from another forum, but still relevant.
    I read this on the Yahoo news page this morning. I have been telling the young people I know to enter the trades if they want a good paying future.

    Since the 1970s, parents have been told that a university degree -- and the entry it affords into the so-called knowledge economy -- was the only track to a financially secure profession. But all of the skilled trades offer a career path with an almost assured income, Joerres said, and make it possible to open one's own business.

    In the United States, recession and persistent high unemployment may lead parents and young people entering the workforce to reconsider their options.

    WELDERS NEEDED

    The skilled trades category also includes jobs like bricklayers, cabinet makers, plumbers and butchers, jobs that typically require a specialist's certification.

    Older, experienced workers are retiring and their younger replacements often do not have the right training because their schools are out of touch with modern business needs. Also contributing to the shortage is social stigma attached to such work, Manpower argues in its paper published on Wednesday.

    A poll of 15-year-olds by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development found only one in 10 American teenagers see themselves in a blue-collar job at age 30. The proportion was even lower in Japan.

    Education could address that stigma. Students should be reminded that blue-collar work can be lucrative: skilled plumbers can make upwards of $75,000 a year, Manpower argues.

    Overall, Manpower's fifth annual talent shortage survey found 31 percent of employers worldwide are having difficulty filling positions due to the lack of suitable workers available in their markets, up one percentage point over last year.

    I also hope that this will cause many of the schools tha that are removing shop as an option to rethink their plans.


    I'm with Wagner, I hope so too, but am skeptical if they will respond to the need or not. A lot of the old trades are getting knda thin in the "old Hand" department anymore. I would support special funding to keep the shop, concrete, and carpentry classes in High School. I was a product of the shop era, and I made a pretty good living over the years. I never got rich, but I fed 2 families and kept em clothed, and lights on and a car to drive, so I figure I came out pretty good, all in all.
    Bob

    You know when you really think about it that's all that really matters.
    Sure it would be great to have a vacation home, a house with 13 garages to keep all of the fancy cars in and stuff but no one really NEEDS that stuff.
    In the end it's about your family, friends and a long life with good health, that's all I really ask for.
    I really love what I do and that just makes things even better, too many people working jobs they don't like because they make xyz amount of money a year, that's not for me.




    Oh and dont forget that the blue collar job does not require sitting at a desk for 8 hours. Personally I could not sit for that long.




    Oh and dont forget that the blue collar job does not require sitting at a desk for 8 hours. Personally I could not sit for that long.
    I sit in a wheelchair all of the time and it sucks. I could never have done it b4 I got ill and ended up in a wheelie chair. Oh well, stuff happens and you gotta play the cards your dealt. Long live the real worker who works with his hands and his head. Gotta wonder how that dude in India is gonna fix my car and weld my ramps together. Oh yeah, he aint... US flag wave
    Bob








    You will always have a job in the Trades kewl_thumb All of my family except for a douche bag cousin and my aunt and uncle that are school teachers, are hands on people. My Father has a rug business, my Mother is a professional Seamstress, my Grandfather farmed, commercial fished, had an excavating company and so on, my Great Grandfather was a true carpenter. It is in the blood, I was told to go to college and have a better life, by all of them. I am happy right here, all the kids I went to school with that looked down on "the shop kids" are still living in mommys basement working retail for minimum wage. I have a good job, and my own gig on the side. We need to keep doing what we are doing and show the younger (me I am 29 and feel like an oldtimer) generation that there is money to be made doing this. My son is a year and a half old and I already see it in him.


    By the way everyone at my real job that is a Tradesman, gets a senior discount if you get my drift hit I am the youngest in the maintanance division by 25 years, and I am only 29.
    Last edited by TozziWelding; 08-28-2010, 03:29 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Talk with your kids about their future

    A hash of our opinions on another forum, please comment.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Talk with your kids about their future

      sort of relates

      2 days ago when we were filling out the paper work for phoebe's birth certificate, there was a line that asked highest level of education.

      my wife filled hers out and then went to fill in my box. since there was a big jump from some high school all the way up to professional. there was no box for trade school. there was some college, aa, ba/bs, masters, professional. so joey on her own checked off professional for me.

      next day the hospitals birth records department called our room and said that only lawyers and doctors are professionals told her i have 2 brother in laws that are a doctor and a lawyer, and they still need my professional services

      i guess 4 years of union apprenticeship/ school, finishing valedictorian still only qualified me as a high school graduate. no problem, i still make more than the dr. and lawyer

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Talk with your kids about their future

        Rick, I have been doing jobs for myself since I was 13. I am 29 now with my own business, and a real job for the benefits. I did 4 years with the Ironworkers, learned from some of the best Pipefitters in the biz, and will never turn down a job. My son is one and a half years old, and I already see the Tradesman in him. I will never ever tell him to go to school for " a better life" , that has burned my azz since my Grandfather said it. He was a Commercial Fisherman making more $$ than a college educated person. I am happy as a "dumb welder", I am working, feeding my family and paying my bills with a little extra on the side. I will take courses in continuing education for my field, as well as the related ones. I am not downing being well educated, but choose it wisely.
        Last edited by TozziWelding; 08-28-2010, 04:03 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Talk with your kids about their future

          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
          sort of relates

          2 days ago when we were filling out the paper work for phoebe's birth certificate, there was a line that asked highest level of education.

          my wife filled hers out and then went to fill in my box. since there was a big jump from some high school all the way up to professional. there was no box for trade school. there was some college, aa, ba/bs, masters, professional. so joey on her own checked off professional for me.

          next day the hospitals birth records department called our room and said that only lawyers and doctors are professionals told her i have 2 brother in laws that are a doctor and a lawyer, and they still need my professional services

          i guess 4 years of union apprenticeship/ school, finishing valedictorian still only qualified me as a high school graduate. no problem, i still make more than the dr. and lawyer

          rick.
          As the Bluecollar boy, I saved my Mother in Laws azz(RN she is) on Thanksgiving day due to a plugged sewer line
          Last edited by TozziWelding; 08-28-2010, 04:04 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Talk with your kids about their future

            The last study I read (I'll try to find it. Could be WSJ) it concluded that only about 20% of high school students were truly qualified and should attend accredited 4 year institutions.

            It in no way means that the other 80% wouldn't graduate from college. What they were saying is that they were not much better off by attending.

            J.C.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Talk with your kids about their future

              If a person sets there mind to go into a trade and learn and do it right
              They will get paid why they learn
              They will end up making More than most most people
              and they wont have a big student loan to pay off

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Talk with your kids about their future

                I had this conversation with my wife a few weeks ago.
                Our conclusion. As a parent if you truly want what's best for your kids future, I think you have to expand on what's working for you, right now.
                For my wife and I it's developing our two businesses so that they are even more financially secure then what we planned for when we started them. Our intention is to move our kids into the companies at an early age and teach them responsibility and then eventually taking over the operations.
                I think the days of sending your kids off to the best colleges and them getting great jobs when they graduate is over. (Its no longer what you know its who you know)

                I know at least a dozen parents who's kids have graduated from great schools, UCLA, UCI, USC etc.... in the last two years, (tops of there class) and they can't find jobs anywhere. I even have a niece who graduated from USC over 10 years ago, again tops of her class, got out, got a great high paying job, and then two years ago the company she worked for bellied up. So far she can't find a job even close to what she had. She was forced to move back in with mom and dad just to survive, and that’s a 32 year old woman.

                There competing with more experienced job seekers who have more to loose if they don't have a job so there willing to take less to get the same job. I don't foresee that changing in the coming years based on both National and International economics.

                As I write this my daughter who is nine is working in my wives company today, (no school) learning how to sort and file customers invoices.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Talk with your kids about their future

                  Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                  sort of relates

                  2 days ago when we were filling out the paper work for phoebe's birth certificate, there was a line that asked highest level of education.

                  my wife filled hers out and then went to fill in my box. since there was a big jump from some high school all the way up to professional. there was no box for trade school. there was some college, aa, ba/bs, masters, professional. so joey on her own checked off professional for me.

                  next day the hospitals birth records department called our room and said that only lawyers and doctors are professionals told her i have 2 brother in laws that are a doctor and a lawyer, and they still need my professional services

                  i guess 4 years of union apprenticeship/ school, finishing valedictorian still only qualified me as a high school graduate. no problem, i still make more than the dr. and lawyer

                  rick.
                  Originally posted by Watersurgeon View Post
                  I had this conversation with my wife a few weeks ago.
                  Our conclusion. As a parent if you truly want what's best for your kids future, I think you have to expand on what's working for you, right now.
                  For my wife and I it's developing our two businesses so that they are even more financially secure then what we planned for when we started them. Our intention is to move our kids into the companies at an early age and teach them responsibility and then eventually taking over the operations.
                  I think the days of sending your kids off to the best colleges and them getting great jobs when they graduate is over. (Its no longer what you know its who you know)

                  I know at least a dozen parents who's kids have graduated from great schools, UCLA, UCI, USC etc.... in the last two years, (tops of there class) and they can't find jobs anywhere. I even have a niece who graduated from USC over 10 years ago, again tops of her class, got out, got a great high paying job, and then two years ago the company she worked for bellied up. So far she can't find a job even close to what she had. She was forced to move back in with mom and dad just to survive, and that’s a 32 year old woman.

                  There competing with more experienced job seekers who have more to loose if they don't have a job so there willing to take less to get the same job. I don't foresee that changing in the coming years based on both National and International economics.

                  As I write this my daughter who is nine is working in my wives company today, (no school) learning how to sort and file customers invoices.

                  Well said guys. School is necessary for many careers but most don't need it. I am the only one in my office that does not have at least a bachelors degree. Why is that? Because i have experience, when I got hurt and the doctors told me that I had to basically find a desk job, I found one related to my industry. I remember when I submitted my resume the application said Bachelors degree required. I have some college but not even enough for an associates degree. I learned how to work with people being in the service industry and how to sell them on the jobs they need.

                  Most of my friends are still paying off their school loans and some will be for the next 7-10 yrs still. Will I save for College for my kids? You bet. But will I force them to go if they don't want to? No.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Talk with your kids about their future

                    My belief in this matteris college is a good thing. If I could do it again I would still go to college, maybe not the same one but still college. A lot of you guys know my story but most of the new guys probably dont. I grew up in the plumbing trade. Since 12 years old. Plumbing and Excavating paid for my college education. I worked plumbing for years to pay for school both before and after. When I graduated I could not find a job to save my life in Mechanical engineering in which I have my degree. Fortunately I had plumbing to fall back on. I worked for a number of years plumbing until I found a Job at a civil Engineering firm designing Backflow Preventer Installation drawings, Sewage pump station water mains, sewer mains, meter vaults, drainage systems and on and on. Without plumbing I wouldnt have my job that I do today, with out college I wouldnt have my job either.

                    Will I encourage my child to go to college. Yes will I encourage him to work in the trades, hands down. I would LOVE my son to be well rounded and be able to school himself to do whatever he desires. This is my tune now..... lets see how I feel in 18 years when the time comes to act upon my words...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Talk with your kids about their future

                      Originally posted by wrench spinner View Post
                      My belief in this matteris college is a good thing. If I could do it again I would still go to college, maybe not the same one but still college. A lot of you guys know my story but most of the new guys probably dont. I grew up in the plumbing trade. Since 12 years old. Plumbing and Excavating paid for my college education. I worked plumbing for years to pay for school both before and after. When I graduated I could not find a job to save my life in Mechanical engineering in which I have my degree. Fortunately I had plumbing to fall back on. I worked for a number of years plumbing until I found a Job at a civil Engineering firm designing Backflow Preventer Installation drawings, Sewage pump station water mains, sewer mains, meter vaults, drainage systems and on and on. Without plumbing I wouldnt have my job that I do today, with out college I wouldnt have my job either.

                      Will I encourage my child to go to college. Yes will I encourage him to work in the trades, hands down. I would LOVE my son to be well rounded and be able to school himself to do whatever he desires. This is my tune now..... lets see how I feel in 18 years when the time comes to act upon my words...
                      I think that's the nail on the head. Far too many adults I see that have children a few years from college or in college do absolutely nothing to prepare them for situations that college will not cover.

                      I easily consider a person aged 25 to 30 without a 4 year degree that's applied themselves in life to be completely equal to most college graduates I've encountered. One wouldn't necessarily have an advantage over the other if I was hiring them.

                      Future college graduates need to be more rounded in related fields to set themselves apart. Those that only have the degree are becoming a dime a dozen.

                      J.C.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X