Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
To warranty or not warranty Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: To warranty or not warranty

    I would like to charge labor on a callback for a product failure but usually do not. It depends on the situation. If the customer supplied the parts then yes I charge labor, If I supplied the parts that's where it gets tricky. Pumps are a good example, installed properly but it lasts 11 months, customer is not going to pay, Pacific doesn't give me a refund till it gets sent back to be checked so I end up buying the new pump on the service day and get a refund or replacement later. So I am out the pump cost at first and the labor (up to 1 year). But if it was 1 year and 4 months I would probably do the same thing depending on how I was spoken to.
    Seattle Drain Service

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: To warranty or not warranty

      I checked out the water heater yesterday. The thermostat failed, but it's not externally obvious why. I replaced the thermostat and the water heater began to function normally.

      Interesting observation. There was water on the floor from under the water heater. The water heater was dripping from somewhere on the bottom. Once the heater warmed up the dripping stopped. The exact same thing happened last year as well. I imagine something expanded when the heater got to temperature and closed the leak.

      It's a State water heater, about 10 years old.

      I ended up charging a couple hours labor but I didn't charge for the thermostat, as I'm trying to get State to warranty it. The lady at the supply house who is in charge of warranty claims told the salesman I dealt with that, in fact, there's no warranty on the thermostat when it's installed in a heater that's out of warranty. (I asked if she was a blond since that's one of the silliest things I've heard in a long time.)

      So I called to the manufacturers Rep and they said to send it back and if it was defective they may warranty it.

      We'll see what happens.
      Time flies like an arrow.

      Fruit flies like a banana.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: To warranty or not warranty

        Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
        I checked out the water heater yesterday. The thermostat failed, but it's not externally obvious why. I replaced the thermostat and the water heater began to function normally.

        Interesting observation. There was water on the floor from under the water heater. The water heater was dripping from somewhere on the bottom. Once the heater warmed up the dripping stopped. The exact same thing happened last year as well. I imagine something expanded when the heater got to temperature and closed the leak.

        It's a State water heater, about 10 years old.

        I ended up charging a couple hours labor but I didn't charge for the thermostat, as I'm trying to get State to warranty it. The lady at the supply house who is in charge of warranty claims told the salesman I dealt with that, in fact, there's no warranty on the thermostat when it's installed in a heater that's out of warranty. (I asked if she was a blond since that's one of the silliest things I've heard in a long time.)

        So I called to the manufacturers Rep and they said to send it back and if it was defective they may warranty it.

        We'll see what happens.
        Is your water a condensation issue from the the startup and the cold water against the hot tank bottom?
        Distractions are everywhere, don't lose sight of your dream.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: To warranty or not warranty

          Originally posted by Devine Plumbing View Post
          Is your water a condensation issue from the the startup and the cold water against the hot tank bottom?
          Nope.

          The water on the floor was there when I arrived. At that time the water in the water heater was actually fairly hot water. The reason for that is the hotel manager knew enough to shut off the water heater using the on/off switch, but he left the hot and cold water isolation valves open. Since the water heater is in parallel with another heater and each has a circulating pump that continued to run the water heater probably had 110 degree water in it when I arrived.

          The bottom of the heater was dripping. Roughly a half hour after the water heater was returned to service the dripping stopped.

          Since it's happened twice now I have to presume the leak is temperature related.
          Time flies like an arrow.

          Fruit flies like a banana.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: To warranty or not warranty

            We ALWAYS installed our aquastats in a dry well.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: To warranty or not warranty

              Originally posted by vette850 View Post
              We ALWAYS installed our aquastats in a dry well.
              This thermostat has three separate sensors that are immersed in water. In the failure last year the upper sensor had failed. So I investigated whether I could convert it to a dry well. The manufacturers rep informed me I would open myself up to considerable liability issues had I done so. I figured there would be a slight delay in thermostat reaction time, so I would just lower the temperature a bit.

              The only dry well the supply house had was too short for the sensor, although it was (diametrically speaking) a perfect snug fit. If I could have located some copper tube and a cap of the exact same diameter I would have extended the well and converted it. However, the wholesale house didn't have the correct size.

              The lower sensors would have remained immersed.
              Time flies like an arrow.

              Fruit flies like a banana.

              Comment

              Working...
              X