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  • #16
    Re: Replacing and existing well pump

    Originally posted by Western Reserve View Post
    Lived in Marin County for a quarter century and left five years ago, fed up. Here's the fantasy: everybody should live and let live, what happens on my property is my business, and on and on.

    Now the reality: With one of every five neighbors an attorney, and one of every three neighbors millionaire or multi-millionaire, the Golden Rule applies: the guy with the gold makes the rules. You can stand there in court with all the proper papers, having done everything exactly right and hear the judge say, "Guilty." That's just how it works. It happened to me.

    Here's how a friend did it: Sunday morning, around five, he assembled a bunch of us and we quietly constructed a project. That was in 1988, and it still stands to this day. His cost was around ten grand, without government approval. With government approval, it would have cost ten to fifteen times that, if it were allowed at all. They can make you re-pave the street in front of your site, replace sewer, storm and water mains. all in return for the coveted building permit. I'm not making this up.

    So, the pump issue? I think next Sunday morning it could be taken care of, quietly, quickly, before the neighbors are back from their run on Tam and their latte at Peet's. Just my two to three cents.
    I like your enthusiasm and couldn't agree with you more. Good to know there are some people out there that I would like to have as neighbors.

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    • #17
      Re: Replacing and existing well pump

      Originally posted by Western Reserve View Post
      Lived in Marin County for a quarter century and left five years ago, fed up. Here's the fantasy: everybody should live and let live, what happens on my property is my business, and on and on.

      Now the reality: With one of every five neighbors an attorney, and one of every three neighbors millionaire or multi-millionaire, the Golden Rule applies: the guy with the gold makes the rules. You can stand there in court with all the proper papers, having done everything exactly right and hear the judge say, "Guilty." That's just how it works. It happened to me.

      Here's how a friend did it: Sunday morning, around five, he assembled a bunch of us and we quietly constructed a project. That was in 1988, and it still stands to this day. His cost was around ten grand, without government approval. With government approval, it would have cost ten to fifteen times that, if it were allowed at all. They can make you re-pave the street in front of your site, replace sewer, storm and water mains. all in return for the coveted building permit. I'm not making this up.

      So, the pump issue? I think next Sunday morning it could be taken care of, quietly, quickly, before the neighbors are back from their run on Tam and their latte at Peet's. Just my two to three cents.
      Thanks, I know all about this and agree 100%. I like to blast Mike Savage on My radio with the windows down in slow traffic! I have a great GLAREfor the Libs! GO TEA PARTY!! SEMPER FI
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Replacing and existing well pump

        Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
        Again, this is an existing old brick lined well. to replace pump and motor shouldn't require a permit,should it ? this is not connected to home,for garden and a few animals. My fears In this Yuppie town the
        inspector could have her cap this great recourse! They are over the top in abusing their powers,worse than S.F. It's their 1 st Lil home,
        with expensive $800,000 houses towering over Her Little Homestead with a few sheep and Goats.
        I wouldn't pull a permit on a repair, and I wouldn't ask. My concern would be about contaminants in a shallow "dug" well. I would encourage the owner to get the water tested for contaminants.

        I once had to tell a homeowner in Connecticut their well was dry. There was maybe a pint of water sitting in a puddle on the bottom of the dug well. I will never forget how angry the homeowner, a woman, became. I didn't know what I was talking about, and I was trying to scam her. Yadda yadda. When I suggested she take a look down her well, and that she should call a well driller she told me to get the hell out. No wishes left in that well!
        Time flies like an arrow.

        Fruit flies like a banana.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Replacing and existing well pump

          Originally posted by Driller1 View Post
          No permit would be needed in Michigan.

          Call you country and just ask. Don't tell them who you are.
          And call from a pay phone or turn off caller ID on our phone.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

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