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med gas piping question

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  • med gas piping question

    The term hard drawn copper tube is used when talking abut the installation of
    Positive pressure gas ...... In my case oxygen. my boss seems to think this
    Would include soft copper that is also seamless I'm not so sure
    Any more knowledgeable med gas plumber input would be appreciated


  • #2
    Re: med gas piping question

    http://www.camlee.com/Products/plumbingtubespecs.htm here's one difference.Soft copper is annealed,that's what makes it soft,check the pressure ratings on the chart.
    Last edited by leakfree; 11-04-2010, 07:01 PM.
    Steve in the trade since 73 doing new residential/Commercial work

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    • #3
      Re: med gas piping question

      The only pressure requirements I can find on med gas piping (copper)
      Is the flexes and gas rail systems must have a burst rating of 1000 psi and the pressure
      Running through the pipes oxygen will range between 50 and 55 psi.

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      • #4
        Re: med gas piping question

        http://www.pmengineer.com/Articles/Cover_Story/8f9a748307298010VgnVCM100000f932a8c0____ here's a little reading for you
        Steve in the trade since 73 doing new residential/Commercial work

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        • #5
          Re: med gas piping question

          Back in the early 1990's I worked on a hospital wing remodel in Laguna Beach where the building architecture was rounded. The Inspector let us use soft copper on our med gas main runs to run in the tight radus of the building sofits. We had to clean and cap the copper before installation.

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          • #6
            Re: med gas piping question

            every state is different I know but here you have to be certified to install med gas piping and if you are then you know that the medical gas code will answer this question.

            http://www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/plumber/mgp_installer.pdf
            ---------------
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            ---------------
            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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            • #7
              Re: med gas piping question

              ours says hard drawn. and must be Oxy rated

              I`m doing a spinal hospital right now.. miles of pipe

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              • #8
                Re: med gas piping question

                call the governing authority and read the code book. all of it end to end. breid................

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                • #9
                  Re: med gas piping question

                  Read your code book or call your verifier.

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                  • #10
                    Re: med gas piping question

                    Had a little time to look into this a little bit. My code book (NFPA 99C 2005 edition section 5.1.10.1.4) says for positive pressure systems tubes shall be hard-drawn seamless copper ASTM B 819 Type L except where operating pressures are above a guage pressure of 185 psi, Type K shall be used for sizes larger than 3 1/8 inch OD.

                    5.1.10.1.5 ASTM B 819 tubing shall be identified by the manufacturer's markings "OXY" "MED" "OXY/MED" "OXY/ACR" or "ACR/MED" in blue (type L) or green (type K)

                    ASTM B819 states,
                    “This specification establishes the requirements for two wall thickness schedules of specially cleaned, straight lengths of seamless copper tube, identified as Types K and L, suitable for medical gas systems. The tube shall be installed in conformance with the requirements of the National Fire Protection
                    Association (NFPA) Standard 99 – Health Care Facilities, NFPA Standard 99C - Gas and Vacuum Systems, NFPA Standard 99B - Standard for Hypobaric Facilities, and Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Standard Z 305.1/Z 7396.1, Nonflammable Medical Gas Piping Systems”.


                    5.1.10.1.1 Tubes, valves, fitings, station outlets, and other piping components shall be cleaned by the manufacturer prior to installation.

                    It all must come cleaned and plugged or capped and you are supposed to keep all your documents from the supplier certifying this.


                    In all of this that I have ran and worked on I have never seen coils used. Vacuum lines allow ASTM B 88, B 280, and B 819, so I think you may possibly be allowed to for vacuum lines, but not for Oxygen or any other pressure lines.

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