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Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

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  • Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

    Received this from my local Rohl rep.

    "The plumber should have used an 18mm, but he started with a 19mm. Since it's recessed a bit, I'm at a loss for what to do. Can you offer some advice?"

    I suggested he try pounding on a 17mm or 11/16 deep socket.

    Anyone have an alternative suggestion?

  • #2
    Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

    Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
    Received this from my local Rohl rep.

    "The plumber should have used an 18mm, but he started with a 19mm. Since it's recessed a bit, I'm at a loss for what to do. Can you offer some advice?"

    I suggested he try pounding on a 17mm or 11/16 deep socket.

    Anyone have an alternative suggestion?
    Can crying be an option?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

      Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
      Received this from my local Rohl rep.

      "The plumber should have used an 18mm, but he started with a 19mm. Since it's recessed a bit, I'm at a loss for what to do. Can you offer some advice?"

      I suggested he try pounding on a 17mm or 11/16 deep socket.

      Anyone have an alternative suggestion?
      and if that doesn't work get a bigger hammer

      Brass is pretty forgiving. I'd try the 18mm (12 point) deep socket if that's the proper size. Tap it on then jerk it with the wrench.

      Next step I'd get the RotoZip with a tile/stone bit. Open it up some and go in with a basin wrench.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

        I remember someone having "twist" sockets. Fits on a normal socket wrench but the internal jaws have a spiral to them to bite damaged sides.

        Think kind of like a female easy out. (Anyone else turned on? )


        J.C.
        Last edited by BobsPlumbing; 11-09-2010, 08:20 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

          Found some reasonably priced. Never tried them though.

          http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...2165000P?mv=rr


          J.C.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

            When I used to encounter situations like this I would take a tub socket that was close to fitting the stem but on the smaller side so it would not fit and cut a couple of slices downward about a quarter of an inch. Then I would tap it on to the stem. This worked most of the time, I have even done this with a deep six point steel socket from my tool box.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

              I just use one that's slightly oversized, and push two flatheads in at opposing sides, then turn it out with a my pump pliers. That way I can reuse the socket later.

              Originally posted by rookie plumber View Post
              When I used to encounter situations like this I would take a tub socket that was close to fitting the stem but on the smaller side so it would not fit and cut a couple of slices downward about a quarter of an inch. Then I would tap it on to the stem. This worked most of the time, I have even done this with a deep six point steel socket from my tool box.
              No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                I know... I know...

                What can I say they work

                http://www.endeavorproducts.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                  Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                  I just use one that's slightly oversized, and push two flatheads in at opposing sides, then turn it out with a my pump pliers. That way I can reuse the socket later.
                  I've had some Grohe diverter valves that a gorilla with the right size socket couldn't get loose with a cheater bar. I'm willing to bet this thing is cranked in there or has some VooDoo epoxy seal.

                  Try tightening. That could be a reverse thread cartridge.


                  J.C.
                  Last edited by BobsPlumbing; 11-09-2010, 10:42 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                    I second the basin wrench idea!
                    Ideal Plumbing

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                      <When I used to encounter situations like this I would take a tub socket that was close to fitting the stem but on the smaller side so it would not fit and cut a couple of slices downward about a quarter of an inch. Then I would tap it on to the stem. This worked most of the time, I have even done this with a deep six point steel socket from my tool box. >

                      Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                      I just use one that's slightly oversized, and push two flatheads in at opposing sides, then turn it out with a my pump pliers. That way I can reuse the socket later.

                      I'm having a hard time visualizing what you guys are describing. Mojourneyman: Are you inserting two flathead screwdrivers into the 3/8 drive end of the socket and trying to get into the flats?

                      Rookie, Are you cutting slices in the socket so it expands a little then force it onto the stem?

                      Thanks in advance.
                      Time flies like an arrow.

                      Fruit flies like a banana.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                        the tubular tub sockets are typically too sloppy to fit a recessed stem that's inside of a brass "shoulder"

                        i had a widespread the customer bought that had a factory leak. the company sent out the new ceramic stem and they didn't bother sending the proprietary socket to remove it it was 3 '' into the valve body with less than 1/4'' clearance. 2 weeks go by and they mailed it to me.

                        fit like a glove, but it was impossible to remove the stem while it was still in the counter. i removed the valve body and took it to my truck. after having to use a vise grip to hold the valve, i finally got the stem out after damaging the socket. the socket actually twisted. replaced the stem and it leaked even worse.

                        long story short, after a total of 3 trips, they finally sent out a new valve body and stem. glad i didn't furnish the faucet as the 3 trips and cost as much as the faucet.

                        i carry both metric and american sk deep sockets and they never fail on valves that have the clearance. the tub sockets are decent for the larger sizes.

                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                          Excellent feedback gentlemen. 18mm 12 point is a good idea. Thought about a basin wrench but the hole would probably be too intrusive. Twist sockets sound intriguing. Also considered shaping a standard plumber's deep socket. Gator grips are a new one to me. I'll second JC's comment on the tightness of factory installed parts. A robotic arm is a gorilla with attitude.
                          Thanks to all of you,
                          Scott

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                            Not through a 3/8 drive socket, through the back of my cowbell sockets.

                            Originally posted by geno gardner View Post


                            I'm having a hard time visualizing what you guys are describing. Mojourneyman: Are you inserting two flathead screwdrivers into the 3/8 drive end of the socket and trying to get into the flats?
                            No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Rolled shoulders on a wall valve cartride

                              Did you get it removed?

                              Thanks.


                              J.C.

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