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  • #16
    Re: Question

    Diameter squared X .785 X Height x 7.48 = cubic feet of water.

    Mark
    Last edited by ToUtahNow; 11-29-2010, 12:10 AM.
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Question

      Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
      Diameter squared X .785 X Height x 7.49 = cubic feet of water.

      Mark
      Maybe I'm not thinking through it right. But as it is in my mind, there is no circle anymore. So there is no diameter, circumference, or radius. Unless there is a divisible somewhere in there.

      No?


      J.C.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Question

        Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
        Maybe I'm not thinking through it right. But as it is in my mind, there is no circle anymore. So there is no diameter, circumference, or radius. Unless there is a divisible somewhere in there.

        No?


        J.C.
        To solve the problem you have to define the whole space (volume of the cylinder then work backwards from that as the equation does)... So yes you still need Radius ect...

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Question

          Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
          Here is the math for it JC...

          Partial volume of Cylinder is: V= L*(R1^2 * acos((R1-h)/R1) - (R1-h)*(2*R1*h-h^2)^.5
          What does this designate in the formula Bill? ^

          Thanks.


          J.C.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Question

            Ah, he!!. Now I've got to find the calculator with the sine, cosine, etc...


            J.C.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Question

              Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
              Maybe I'm not thinking through it right. But as it is in my mind, there is no circle anymore. So there is no diameter, circumference, or radius. Unless there is a divisible somewhere in there.

              No?


              J.C.
              I missed that it was on it's side.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Question

                JC here is a link that shows the math

                http://www.arachnoid.com/TankCalc/

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Question

                  Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
                  Pie R squared times height gives you a volume in cubic inches then divide that answer by 231 (cubic inches in a gallon) for the number of gallons...

                  Disclaimer: I do not consider myself a Ridgid tools consultant
                  Okie, Pi x radius squared gives the area of the circle. To get volume we also need a depth, or height. The third dimension.

                  I learned how to solve JC's question in high school, but darn it if I can remember that now. I'm grazing through http://www.khanacademy.org

                  It's in here somewhere, but there are so many distractions.
                  Time flies like an arrow.

                  Fruit flies like a banana.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Question

                    http://www.aqua-calc.com/calculate/v...ontal-cylinder
                    the formula
                    http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/54105.html
                    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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                    • #25
                      Re: Question

                      Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
                      Okie, Pi x radius squared gives the area of the circle. To get volume we also need a depth, or height. The third dimension.

                      I learned how to solve JC's question in high school, but darn it if I can remember that now. I'm grazing through http://www.khanacademy.org

                      It's in here somewhere, but there are so many distractions.
                      Errrm Geno Read the word right after "times" in my first solution

                      Put the Knob Creek away

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Question

                        You still need to find the area which may require using the formula for an arc and factor in the degree. Either way it is beyond my pay grade.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Question

                          Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
                          Imagine a 50 gallon round tank on it's side. You have access at the top to measure the amount of liquid inside with a stick. You can obviously measure the depth and calculate when you have 25 gallons i.e. half full.

                          But how much is left in the tank if it's below the halfway point say...half of that?

                          Not sure of dimensions. How 'bout 32"x22".

                          Thanks.

                          (Heard this on the radio. Can't remember how to get to the answer. )

                          J.C.
                          Why not dump the water out into 5 gallon buckets and get a direct measurement?
                          Time flies like an arrow.

                          Fruit flies like a banana.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Question

                            Seems so simple. But it's not is it?


                            J.C.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Question

                              The second link gives a good description and explanation. I like how the doc states from the beginning that "The problem is not difficult."

                              Not for some.


                              J.C.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Question

                                Originally posted by OkieBill View Post

                                Put the Knob Creek away
                                Can't the glass is stuck to my hand. (Gravy still on fingers from Thanksgiving)
                                Time flies like an arrow.

                                Fruit flies like a banana.

                                Comment

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