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  • #31
    Re: Question

    I’ve been sitting here all day studying for my Water Math Final. Here is an example of the questions the Instructor gave us:

    A construction crew just installed 2,000’ feet of 24” diameter pipe, 1,500’ feet of 18” diameter pipe, 750’ feet of 12” diameter pipe and 3,500’ of 8” diameter pipe. They now need to dose the water in the pipe to a concentration of 50 mg/L. How many pounds of chlorine must they get?

    The questions are very time consuming because of all of the steps but they are fairly easy to solve.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Question

      Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
      What does this designate in the formula Bill? ^

      Thanks.


      J.C.
      ^ raise to the power of

      so

      ^2 = squared 2x2 = 4

      ^3 = cubed 2x2x2 = 8
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
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      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Question

        Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
        I’ve been sitting here all day studying for my Water Math Final. Here is an example of the questions the Instructor gave us:

        A construction crew just installed 2,000’ feet of 24” diameter pipe, 1,500’ feet of 18” diameter pipe, 750’ feet of 12” diameter pipe and 3,500’ of 8” diameter pipe. They now need to dose the water in the pipe to a concentration of 50 mg/L. How many pounds of chlorine must they get?

        The questions are very time consuming because of all of the steps but they are fairly easy to solve.

        Mark

        Here is the formula for disinfecting ...

        Pi x r^2 x 7.5 gal/ft^3 x 8.33 lbs/gal x 50/1,000,000

        and that will give the lbs of chlorine to use for a 50 ppm ratio.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Question

          Originally posted by Plumbducky View Post
          Here is the formula for disinfecting ...

          Pi x r^2 x 7.5 gal/ft^3 x 8.33 lbs/gal x 50/1,000,000

          and that will give the lbs of chlorine to use for a 50 ppm ratio.
          Yeap
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Question

            I remember the first time as an apprentice I tried showing off my "smarts", I was still in school and decided I was going to use the formula to offset angles to calculate the lengths of pieces I was going to need for a set of soil stack offsets.

            My boss walked in as I started, laughed when I told him what I was doing and told me to put away the pencil, paper and calculator, hold the fittings together in place and take a simple measurement.

            I mention this because for all the time it might take for me to fumble through high school geometry/trigonometry books, I could just grab my tape measure, measure the perimeter of the partial radius, then add the length (cross section slice) from end to end for the total outside perimeter of the partial circle.

            figuring the total outside perimeter as I would the perimeter of a square to find the area, I would divide the total perimeter of the partial circle by four and multiply that number by itself (squared) for square area.

            Then multiply that number by H for the cubic volume.

            Move over Euclid.
            Last edited by DuckButter; 11-30-2010, 12:52 AM.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Question

              Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
              I remember the first time as an apprentice I tried showing off my "smarts", I was still in school and decided I was going to use the formula to offset angles to calculate the lengths of pieces I was going to need for a set of soil stack offsets.

              My boss walked in as I started, laughed when I told him what I was doing and told me to put away the pencil, paper and calculator, hold the fittings together in place and take a simple measurement.

              I mention this because for all the time it might take for me to fumble through high school geometry/trigonometry books, I could just grab my tape measure, measure the perimeter of the partial radius, then add the length (cross section slice) from end to end for the total outside perimeter of the partial circle.

              figuring the total outside perimeter as I would the perimeter of a square to find the area, I would divide the total perimeter of the partial circle by four and multiply that number by itself (squared) for square area.

              Then multiply that number by H for the cubic volume.

              Move over Euclid.
              Yeah.....uhm......I can't talk to you anymore.

              Back to my lollipop, cartoons, and safety helmet.


              J.C.

              Comment

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