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Lesson for the day: It pays to listen to the customer

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  • Lesson for the day: It pays to listen to the customer

    After changing out the cartridge on a customer's 6 year old thermostatic shower valve (Waterworks w/THG inwall) I had a conversation with him about how I calibrated the temp setting. He was wondering if he would still have to readjust the temperature during his morning shower. I asked what he meant by that. In trying to explain, he started talking about the temperature in the pipes changing. I thought he meant on the hot side and told him that the difference in temperature between the recirculated hot water and the water coming from the tank was very small. He said, "No! Not the hot water, the cold water." Then I realized that he was talking about the cold water sitting in the walls and between floors for hours that must be quite a bit warmer than city water. He said he had always noticed that he had to adjust the valve to a higher temp after a couple of minutes when he took his shower in the morning.
    Thinking about this, I could see that in a big house with large diameter cold water lines (2" entering the house and 1-1/4" going up stairs to the master and 2nd bath) there would be a considerable amount of water that had been sitting in a conditioned building for many undisturbed hours (with a substantial T, especially in the winter) that had to be purged before city water was mixing in his valve. If I used a thermostatic valve at home I would have known this from personal experience. Alas, the only time I make use of a thermostatic valve is with clothes on, trying to calibrate, clean or repair the damned thing without getting sopping wet.
    A case of the obvious. All it takes is a little experience.

  • #2
    Re: Lesson for the day: It pays to listen to the customer

    A thermostatic valve operate based on Temp differentials. So why should it make any difference if the cold water temperature changes, or the hot water? Here in Minnesota the temp of the cold water coming out of the tap changes by 20 degrees over the course of the year. I've never had any complaints regarding temperature variations about any of the Thermostatic shower valves I've installed.
    Time flies like an arrow.

    Fruit flies like a banana.

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    • #3
      Re: Lesson for the day: It pays to listen to the customer

      Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
      A thermostatic valve operates based on Temp differentials. So why should it make any difference if the cold water temperature changes, or the hot water?
      It shouldn't. But, evidently with a THG thermostatic valve it does. According to my Grohe rep, who looked pretty extensively at THG's valve some years ago,
      " The mass of the temperature element (in the cartridge) would make rapid automatic adjustment very difficult.... it would be very difficult to meet ASSE 1016 - particularly at lower flow rates.

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