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  • Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

    What sets them off? Heat? Smoke? Where are the sensors, in the sprinkler heads themselves?

    Would say, soldering nearby (3 ft.) and the smoke or heat from that set them off?

    If so, is there a way to temporarily shut it down? Or should the sensor be covered somehow?

    Inquiring plumber minds want to know.
    "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

  • #2
    Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

    Originally posted by SlimTim View Post
    What sets them off? Heat? Smoke? Where are the sensors, in the sprinkler heads themselves?

    Would say, soldering nearby (3 ft.) and the smoke or heat from that set them off?

    If so, is there a way to temporarily shut it down? Or should the sensor be covered somehow?

    Inquiring plumber minds want to know.
    I believe it is Heat/Vial.

    Shouldn't set it off.

    Cover if you're scared.

    Have a couple of small wood wedges ready.


    J.C.

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    • #3
      Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

      Sorry, you said Residential. No experience there. It may be something totally different.


      J.C.

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      • #4
        Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

        They will activate if they reach a certain temperature. Not sure how hot it has to be, but they will activate individually. The sensor is in the head if it is a wet sprinkler system. Like JC said you can keep some small wooden wedges handy. Push them in from opposite sides for a quick shutoff. In CT, homes with a sprinkler system have a second dedicated water line just for the sprinklers. Know where it is before you start so you can turn it off in an emergency. Sorry. I know this is the plumbing pro section. I’M NOT A PLUMBER. I’m speaking from 13 years in the fire service.

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        • #5
          Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

          Next time that your near one look at the head,lot's of them have the temp. stamped on them,heads need heat to go off,if one pops it won't make the others in the building go off unless they recieve heat in excess of the heads rating.Had an app. set one off years back doing a water heater in a closet w/a head above him,he got a good bath.If I think there's a chance of one popping I wrap it with a good thick towel for a little piece of mind.Commercial "smoke detectors" can be shut down or they make a small plastic cover that you can snap on it to seal it off temporarily.
          Steve in the trade since 73 doing new residential/Commercial work

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          • #6
            Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

            Originally posted by SlimTim View Post
            What sets them off? Heat? Smoke? Where are the sensors, in the sprinkler heads themselves?

            Would say, soldering nearby (3 ft.) and the smoke or heat from that set them off?

            If so, is there a way to temporarily shut it down? Or should the sensor be covered somehow?

            Inquiring plumber minds want to know.
            I know hitting them with a fork lift will set them off and accidently hitting them with a torch will set them off.

            Other than that, I have no idea

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

              Fire sprinklers, both residential and commercial, are individually activated by heat. There is an exception to this, called a deluge system, but deluge systems are not very common in commercial/industrial, and I cant think of an instance where they would be practical for residential use.

              The most common sprinklers used today are the quick response, glass bulb type, though fusible link heads are still manufactured. The majority of the sprinklers you will run across in a residential setting will be a red glass bulb, which is a 155* sprinkler.

              The glass bulb sprinklers have a bulb filled with liquid, and a small bubble in the liquid. The size of the bubble determines the temp rating of the sprinkler. Temp rating for glass bulb sprinklers is identified by the color of the liquid in the bulb. Fusible link sprinklers have an alloy, similar to solder, that melts at varying temps, releasing the metal link that holds the pip cap in place. Temp rating of fusible alloy sprinklers is identified by the color painted on the sprinkler frame.

              I would avoid sources of heat in close proximity to a sprinkler head. If it's unavoidable, I would use some sort of heat resistant material to shield the sprinkler and try to keep as much heat as possible away from the head (having a helper hold a five gallon bucket over the head, tight against the ceiling should work fine). If you cover the sprinkler, use care since they are fairly fragile. You can shutdown and drain the sprinkler system as a precaution. Remember to restore the system to operation by removing any covers, or heat shielding, and opening all the correct valves.

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              • #8
                Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

                Originally posted by saysflushable View Post
                I know hitting them with a fork lift will set them off and accidently hitting them with a torch will set them off.

                Other than that, I have no idea
                LOL...No it was a skyjacker I was using...quit following me around!!
                Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
                You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

                Derek

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                • #9
                  Re: Regarding Residential Fire Sprinklers

                  Thanks everyone (especially bml)! I am now well educated.
                  (though i already knew not to drive a forklift in the house)
                  "Man will do many things to get himself loved, he will do all things to get himself envied." Mark Twain

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