Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Yet another code question

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Yet another code question

    Our juristiction recently adopted the 2009 UPC, I'm still waiting for my new code book so I apologize for asking without looking for myself.

    The question involves the use of long sweep 1/4 bends on branch lines serving only 1 fixture. A co worker is trying to tell me that long sweep 1/4 bends are not required in vertical to horizontal changes in direction in lines serving only 1 fixture, but are required when said line serves more than 1 fixture.

    Sounds a little fishy to me..... can anyone answer?

    Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Yet another code question

    Originally posted by TMc View Post
    Our juristiction recently adopted the 2009 UPC, I'm still waiting for my new code book so I apologize for asking without looking for myself.

    The question involves the use of long sweep 1/4 bends on branch lines serving only 1 fixture. A co worker is trying to tell me that long sweep 1/4 bends are not required in vertical to horizontal changes in direction in lines serving only 1 fixture, but are required when said line serves more than 1 fixture.

    Sounds a little fishy to me..... can anyone answer?

    Thanks
    May not be required but as a drain cleaner don't make it difficult for the person (who may be you) to cable it in the future...IMO..
    Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
    You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

    Derek

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Yet another code question

      This is from our code book (Minnesota).


      4715.2410 CHANGE IN DIRECTION.

      Changes in direction in drainage piping shall be made by the appropriate use of 45 degree wyes, long or short sweep quarter bends, sixth, eighth, or sixteenth bends, or by combination of these or equivalent fittings. Single and double sanitary tees, quarter bends, and long turn ells may be used in drainage lines only where the direction of the flow is from the horizontal to the vertical. Short sweep bends or long turn ells three inch or larger in diameter may be used in soil or waste lines where the change in direction of flow is from either the horizontal to the vertical or from the vertical to the horizontal.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Yet another code question

        Per 2009 UPC,
        706.0 Changes in Direction of Drainage Flow
        706.4 Vertical drainage lines connecting with horizontal drainage lines shall enter through 45° wye branches, combination wye and one-eighth (1/8) bend branches, or other approved fittings of equivalent sweep...

        This language is unchanged from the previous addition of the UPC (2006).

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Yet another code question

          Thanks guys...... I couldn't see where the number of fixtures really would have had anything to do with it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Yet another code question

            Originally posted by TMc View Post
            Thanks guys...... I couldn't see where the number of fixtures really would have had anything to do with it.
            It's a no brainer, Don't put ANY faith in that Knuckle HEAD
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Yet another code question

              vertical to horizontal. medium sweep is all that's required here. the long sweep is just a fitting that gets you out of a bind. anything beyond a wye and 1/8 bend/ comby is not required, but is made to help around obstacles.

              now a horizontal to vertical down is just a short sweep or san tee.

              rick.
              phoebe it is

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Yet another code question

                A long sweep 90 elbow is actually a shorter pattern than if I put a 45 and st 45 together. Shorter by about the length of a hub. (3/4"). The last time I checked a wye and a st 45 were pretty much the same as a combo.
                Time flies like an arrow.

                Fruit flies like a banana.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Yet another code question

                  AFAIK in 90° CI fittings there is a 1/4 bend, a short sweep, and a long sweep. There is no such animal as a long sweep 1/4 bend and none of these are called 90s, except maybe by some non-plumber types.

                  You can order (at least you used to be able to) a long 1/4 bend or a long 1/8 bend, but that is a 1/4 (or 1/8)bend with a long tangent, the radius remains the same as the std 1/4 or 1/8 bend. Do they still make these fittings I don't know. I haven't run any CI on a job in over a dozen years.

                  I guess I am splitting hairs in my fitting names but if you send an apprentice to get a short sweep 1/4 bend what is he going to come back with? A standard 1/4 bend or a short sweep? I know the journeymen I worked for would get on my case unmercifully if I called a short or long sweep a "long sweep 1/4 bend" or a "short radius 90".

                  Maybe its different where you are, to each his own I guess. Just don't blame the kid if you are giving him mixed information and he doesn't come back with what you wanted.
                  ---------------
                  Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                  ---------------
                  “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                  ---------
                  "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                  ---------
                  sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Yet another code question

                    We just call them:

                    Vent 90-Pretty much a direct turn. No sweep. Legal. Used in extreme tight-frame situations. Rarely though.
                    Regular 90-Typically used in vents only. At least for me. Couldn't be used at one time for horizontal to horizontal. May have changed. I just haven't.
                    Long Sweep 90-Can be used in most all situations.
                    Long Street Sweep 90-Can also be used in most all situations.

                    J.C.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X