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  • domestic product vs. offshore

    I was wondering how many even think about this? Hwt's, furnaces, copper and black fittings. The list is endless.
    I try when I can to support products made in Canada first, then made in North America. It seems that when you get to fittings most stuff comes from offshore. When I first started in the trade, offshore black fittings especially were avoided due to the poor quality. That is no longer an option as they all seem to be imported, quality has improved, but I would still like to support local if the wholesales would stock it. Cheaper I guess.
    I feel if we do not support our own even if it costs a bit more we are just hurting ourselves.
    So do any of you think about this stuff or try to practice purchasing domestic product? It gets hard, cause the stuff does not get stocked. I try to talk to the wholesales, but being larger corporations, they say their hands are tied by purchasing agents at a head office. Seems it don't help to be a squeaky wheel, but I still try to make my preference known.

  • #2
    Re: domestic product vs. offshore

    Yes, I practice that. Sometimes there really isn't an option, but I'm conscience of it.

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    • #3
      Re: domestic product vs. offshore

      Just take a walk down any of the aisles at your local Home Depot, for example, and you see hardly anything manufactuered in the USA anymore. Manufacturing in the US for all practical purposes is all off shore for obvious reasons.....why pay 20 bucks plus benefits for a domestic factory worker when you have people willing to work for under minimum wage in places such as India, Pakistan, ROC, etc. ? Name brand clothing (Levi's, Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, Lands End, LL Bean, the list goes on and on) is all made off shore. Major appliances GE and Whirlpool are manufacturered and shipped back to the states for resale. My 2 year old GE washer was a poor replacement for my 30 year old Maytag Washer...had to throw the old reliable Maytag out because I couldn't get replacement parts anymore

      Gentlemen....we are "circling the drain"!

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      • #4
        Re: domestic product vs. offshore

        We have ordered domestic specifically and have had just as many crooked tapped fittings and sand holes as import, if not more. I have has 3 galviy fittings and nipples that I have had to replace that blew orange water that were domestic in the last couple years. I don't think the quality control is what it used to be. Sad to say. I like to get domestic too but it isn't for a better quality product, just buying american.

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        • #5
          Re: domestic product vs. offshore

          I changed out a 40 gal NG Bradford-White water heater yesterday, and it was installed by me 6 years and one month ago. Warranty expired. Now The B.W. is usually a good heater and American made but it should have lasted 10 years even with our water. Now I went to my supply house and he offered me a B.W. or a Rheem, at the same price. I chose the Rheem this time thinking it was made in USA also, but when I got it back and unboxed it it said made in Mexico. Who knows how long this one will last but my supplier says he gets 4 to 1 warranty returns from B.W. over Rheems. For the record I prefer USA over any foreign made if the cost is close and if the USA option is available.

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          • #6
            Re: domestic product vs. offshore

            Originally posted by swong View Post
            Just take a walk down any of the aisles at your local Home Depot, for example, and you see hardly anything manufactuered in the USA anymore. Manufacturing in the US for all practical purposes is all off shore for obvious reasons.....why pay 20 bucks plus benefits for a domestic factory worker when you have people willing to work for under minimum wage in places such as India, Pakistan, ROC, etc. ? Name brand clothing (Levi's, Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, Lands End, LL Bean, the list goes on and on) is all made off shore. Major appliances GE and Whirlpool are manufacturered and shipped back to the states for resale. My 2 year old GE washer was a poor replacement for my 30 year old Maytag Washer...had to throw the old reliable Maytag out because I couldn't get replacement parts anymore

            Gentlemen....we are "circling the drain"!
            The U.S. outproduces the rest of the world combined by 3 to 1
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: domestic product vs. offshore

              Originally posted by plumb4life View Post
              I changed out a 40 gal NG Bradford-White water heater yesterday, and it was installed by me 6 years and one month ago. Warranty expired. Now The B.W. is usually a good heater and American made but it should have lasted 10 years even with our water. Now I went to my supply house and he offered me a B.W. or a Rheem, at the same price. I chose the Rheem this time thinking it was made in USA also, but when I got it back and unboxed it it said made in Mexico. Who knows how long this one will last but my supplier says he gets 4 to 1 warranty returns from B.W. over Rheems. For the record I prefer USA over any foreign made if the cost is close and if the USA option is available.

              FYI...Since I moved back to where I live now in.. 1998 I have only taken out 1 Rheem I installed and I didn't think it was a leaker, it was A/C leaking...Most Rheems I do take out are dated in the 80's and some are leakers and others are just not worth fixing...
              Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
              You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

              Derek

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              • #8
                Re: domestic product vs. offshore

                Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                The U.S. outproduces the rest of the world combined by 3 to 1

                Use to be ten times higher than that! Look's like we are getting off topic...when I need doemestically manufactuered replacment parts I now rely on eBay however it's getting more and more difficult. When I do score however I tend to stock up when sellers have quantities...Sloan Royal internals, mortise locks, steam shut off valves, etc

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: domestic product vs. offshore

                  The US does not produce more than China. Total manufacturing output for China has been running neck-and-neck for several years. China is currently on pace to overtake the US in terms of industrial production by about 0.5% in 2011. Combined, the two account for about 39% of the world's manufacturing output.

                  The US leads in the production of very large ticket items (example: airplanes). However, we have experienced a decline in global market share for some of these items (You are as likely to get on an Airbus as a Boeing plane these days). We also still have substantial automoble production. Large industrial items (building air conditioners etc, blowers, etc) are still heavily US made, although the US long ago lost its critical leadership pposition in machine tools. Lower cost mass produced consumer goods are completely dominated by Asia, and the lion's share of that goes to China.

                  Also keep in mind that the figures are computed in terms of the reserve currency, which is (for the time being) the US dollar. China has been keeping the value of its currency artificially low to bolster exports. That's one of the major issues between the US and China, and was a topic discussed when China's leader visited Obama here recently. The effect of this is that it understates the value of Chinese production significantly. The result of Chinese currency manipulation is that they actually have significantly higher manufacturing production than we do here in the US.

                  The GDP of the US is more than 3 times that of China. Unfortunately for the US, GDP of the US is about 70% related to consumption, not production. GDP also includes US government expenditures, at over $3.5T, which are largely non-production. Gov't expenditures for military hardware do create US jobs, but the goods produced do not add to the goods and services pool in the same way as normal commercial manufacturing (you can't buy the stuff, nor would you want to...no commercial supply, no commercial demand).

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