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  • PVC venting

    Ok, first off; I have been in Saint Louis all weekend at a con for a bunch of gamers, had a great time, but in my downtime read the PHCC magazine and Plumbing Engineer so this is where this question comes from.
    In the latest issues they had an article about using PVC for flues on boilers and how while the boiler manufacturer might rate pvc as the correct flue material, the pipe manufacturer Does Not.
    Which certainly explains the browning pvc pipe i've seen on some of the power vent water heaters we've installed. Any input? better material to use? experiences similar?

    My question comes because I have a power vent Bradford White sitting in my garage for radiant heat. Should I be using some kind of hermetic steel for the flue?
    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

  • #2
    Re: PVC venting

    Gotta go with manufacturer's installation instructions. If you're really concerned, how about contacting Bradford White tech support with your concerns. Bradford White Corporation | Contact
    Since they don't list a contact no. for a real live human, how about contacting your local BW rep and let them do the leg work?

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    • #3
      Re: PVC venting

      And, please keep us in the loop. Since everything is going to condensing these days, we all need this information.

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      • #4
        Re: PVC venting

        good call, I'll see if they reply to me "i'm their local warranty rep" I'll send the question through their rep in kansas city.
        No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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        • #5
          Re: PVC venting

          The Laars I recently installed the manu. supplied an 18" piece of CPVC for the first section on the exhaust.

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          • #6
            Re: PVC venting

            interesting, Laars is owned by Bradford. this article actually lists the max allowed temp for each flue material, all the way through sch 80 cpvc. apparently on a new boiler you can expect flue temps to be 20 degrees higher than water temp, and that number gets larger as the heater limes up. sch 80 cpvc is listed at 200 degress. The article is advocating installation of an appropriate limit for the flue material.
            They also state that per the IMC all flue materials shall be listed and labelled as flue piping. which pvc is not per the pipe manufacturer.

            gah here we go
            No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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