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  • Troubleshooting Test

    Ok, this is something I ran into with limited resources and had to come up with something. Thought I would run it by you guys to see what you would do. Might be easy for you or we might all learn something.

    I'm sure most of you have seen this type of stubout either in person, the net, or catalog. This was stubbed out for the tub-spout on something I was asked to finish.

    Pay close attention to the O.D. of the stubout. It is the same as a copper fitting. Maybe even a little larger. Don't have a Micrometer or Caliper around to check. Trust me though.

    Now, how do you prepare it for a spout when no fittings will go on, you have no flaring tools, and are an hour round trip from anything?

    Attachment Attachment


    J.C.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Troubleshooting Test

    if it's the same OD as the copper fitting can't you just ream the cut and solder a stub of copper Into the pipe?
    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Troubleshooting Test

      Damn My Slow Fingers!
      Originally posted by TheMaster
      Well if the stub out is alittle larger that a copper fitting as you say........solder a pipe inside yo stubout.
      No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Troubleshooting Test

        Originally posted by TheMaster
        Well if the stub out is alittle larger that a copper fitting as you say........solder a pipe inside yo stubout.
        That seems to make perfect sense. But it wouldn't go even after reaming. I even just double checked with another pipe to make sure I wasn't any crazier than normal. Fitting won't go on the outside, pipe won't go on the inside. I will not lie about it either in case anyone's wondering.


        J.C.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Troubleshooting Test

          at this point I think my solution would involve a clamp to hold it and a stick of sil-fos, But I'm looking forward to hearing how other people would do it.
          No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Troubleshooting Test

            Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
            at this point I think my solution would involve a clamp to hold it and a stick of sil-fos, But I'm looking forward to hearing how other people would do it.
            Me too. I could only think of one way and felt reeeaaallly hackish for doing it. Thought others might think of a better way or some way that I have no experience with.


            J.C.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Troubleshooting Test

              Mighty putty and some chicken wire.


              J.C.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Troubleshooting Test

                Originally posted by TheMaster
                What did you do? Cut slits in the end of it,anneal it,force a fittings to resize it,clean and solder it? braze it then reharden the coppa? WTF man take your tools to work with you next time. LOL
                I had to cut the stubout of course to find out the problem. So I had that. I heated a coupling pretty good, turned the stubout around and used the stubout to flare it to fit. Took off with normal O.D. from there.

                I had several reasons for posting this.

                One, to see what everyone else would come up with.
                Two, to b!tch at Moen. I cut the stub out off, grabbed the Moen spout that has the O-ring mount and pushed it on. Of course it didn't go on.....and pushed the O-ring out. AND you cannot disassemble this spout because it is plastic and the internal body is epoxied into the threads.
                Three, you m'fers better not ever use these pre-made stubs without checking the diameters or you're going to be in a world of hurt on a finish. I don't know who made it. Sioux Chief or whoever. But it is no where near right.

                Keep your eyes open.

                Thanks.


                J.C.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Troubleshooting Test

                  Can you take a quality flaring tool and just clamp down on it to resize it?

                  Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Troubleshooting Test

                    Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                    Can you take a quality flaring tool and just clamp down on it to resize it?

                    Mark
                    Maybe. I only have this tiny piece left and it will be scrapped soon.


                    J.C.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Troubleshooting Test

                      What was the other end of this stub out like? Was it also oversized or did it terminate in a male thread or was it soldered into a male adapter or what? Was this a straight stub or a L- shaped stub out, I have seen both.

                      I like your solution just trying to figure out how this condition came to be.
                      ---------------
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                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Troubleshooting Test

                        Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                        What was the other end of this stub out like? Was it also oversized or did it terminate in a male thread or was it soldered into a male adapter or what? Was this a straight stub or a L- shaped stub out, I have seen both.

                        I like your solution just trying to figure out how this condition came to be.
                        Honestly, I don't know. This was on a finish that I did not rough-in. Someone bought a house with a bonus room that basically had everything done but the trim.

                        So all I was looking at was a spun-weld copper stub sticking straight through a whole.


                        J.C.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Troubleshooting Test

                          Originally posted by TheMaster
                          I bet it froze and swoll up on ya. LOL
                          No, but it pissed me off.


                          J.C.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Troubleshooting Test

                            Find the guy who installed it, and kick his a$$.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Troubleshooting Test

                              You can make a swage with needle nose pliers. Next time you don't have calipers around and need to check the od of a round object, use a cresent wrench then transfer the measurement to a tape measure. Also, when my cutters are dull, they'll push the copper up the sides of the wheel instead of down. The result is it becomes hard to insert the pipe into fittings.
                              Buy cheap, buy twice.

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