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  • Thanks

    Just thought I would pass this along.

    I throughly believe in this forum, and refer people here all the time.

    I think the forum has made me step my game up, and ultimately made me a better plumber. I innstalled a water heater last friday, when I got in to work today (had yesterday off) my boss came out as we were waiting on our first jobs of the day. He told me inspectors usually call when something failed, and one had called about a water heater I put in last week.


    He said it was the best looking install he had ever seen.
    I blame it on you guys.

    Raised the water heater to code, since it was in the garage. Water hammer arrestors are installed in such a manner as to protect entire system weather ball valve to water heater is on or not. Ball valve for heater is relocated to provide easy access in case of needing to use. T&P installed with a air gap and hose clamped so it doesn't go wild if ever used. Installed a wye for adding the T&P since I don't like the idea of using a 3x2 reducer. And I made her call a electrician to re do the wire since it was just nekkid romex to the tank.

    Don't get me started on another press vs swet debate, I had my reasons
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Thanks

    Looks good and the Propress is awsome. I would have done it a little different. I would have used copper for the t&p line, and would have saved a few propress fittings on the cold line. No need to bring the ball valve out front.

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    • #3
      Re: Thanks

      Did I mention I Like the ProPress fittings?

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      • #4
        Re: Thanks

        It looks fine but my understanding is that water hammer arrestors need to be NEAR the fixtures w/ solenoid valves that cause the hammer in the first place.

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        • #5
          Re: Thanks

          question: do electric heaters need to be raised to meet code? in a garage/shop setting. I knew gas did, as they have a flame.
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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          • #6
            Re: Thanks

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            • #7
              Re: Thanks

              Originally posted by TheMaster
              Now you get it!

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              • #8
                Re: Thanks

                Congrats. Our elec. code doesn't allow romex below 7ft. 6" unprotected from mechanical damage. = EMT or armored ,BX. also with the new sealed gas combustion chambers We don.t have to raise 18". Elec doesn't get raised. Looks neat!
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                • #9
                  Re: Thanks

                  I mean no disrespect, but if PVC is only rated to 73°f, how can you justify using it on a temp-pres relief valve discharge line?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Thanks

                    Originally posted by TheMaster
                    No primer between the 45 and the wye? Plastic pipe clamped without an insulator by a hose clamp. If there is a thermal expansion tank it wouldn't do any good if the ball valve is closed. I like to pipe them on the heater side of the ballvalve. I'm guess if the temp/pressure relief valve ever really "BLASTED" that "rig" would splatter hot water everywhere.

                    It's CPVC coming off the T&P.

                    they don'trequire insulating the lines here since it is in a closet inside a garage, it shares the space with the heating unit, and it's not a outside wall, it's the kitchen wall. As for the expansion tank, Edmond is the stricter municipality around here, and they require hammer arrestors and a expansion ball valve, if I remember right. Not many places here require a expansion tank anymore. And thanks for spotting the missing strap on the T&P, but that hose clamp isn't just lightly on there, it is tightened down. There is no way it could come loose in the event that the valve opened, unless it softens the CPVC to the point that it slips out, but that is pretty far fetched. And if I would have thought about it, I would have coppere'd the T&P line as well! Thanks for reminding me! will do it next time. Maybe swet it so my torch doesn't think I am a total traitor!

                    As for piping it directly to the drain, I persoanlly don't agree with it, but there again, not going to argue with the inspectors that pvc is not rated for the temperature that the water would be if the tp valve opened due to high temperature. I think it should at least go to the pan, or outside, but they will fail it if in the pan in some areas here.

                    As for raising the water heater, it's weird here. Tulsa let you put the closed chamber gas heaters on the ground, but still made you raise the electric ones, some of the surrounding areas around Tulsa, would still make you raise them. but OKC where that heater was installed still makes you raise every water heater in the garage.

                    As for the ball valve, yes maybe a little too much piping and time and what not, but that one is MUCH more accessible to anyone that needs to shut the tank off. the homeowner is 80ish so I was keeping her in mind. The only "extra" fitting is on the hot line, the coupling, made a press too soon and had to rotate the T.

                    And yes, I primer everything, I am just not a slob about it. Probably just can't see it thanks to the lighting and camera. the wye and 45 is both 2 inch. And the way I put the hammer arrestors in is so that in case the ball valve gets closed, the cold side is still prrotected from hammer. Because if the valve is closed, no water to the hot system, and having 2 arrestors on a closed system is, useless. Thus, putting it on the live side of the ball valve. And even when closed, the hot side is still protected from, whatever hammer issue there may be, or expansion that would be caused, but it's also then protected by the tp valve.

                    Not here. But here they make up code as they go and when you call them to ask a question they refer you to the code they dont follow. Its a F'n coin flip. -quote

                    And this wasn't in response to your thread, just saying thanks to guys like yourself, Rick, JC, and the many others that have made me want to do installs like that, then have the balls to post pictures and let you guys tee off on me!

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                    • #11
                      Re: Thanks

                      out here unions are required on the hot and cold connections to the heater. i also install 1 on the prv. as santa monica requires it.

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

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                      • #12
                        Re: Thanks

                        I guess I should have looked a little closer to the labeling on the T & P discharge line.
                        Per PPFA;
                        "CPVC piping which is suitable for hot and cold water distribution has a 400 psi pressure rating at room temperature, and a 100 psi pressure rating at 180 F."

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                        • #13
                          Re: Thanks

                          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                          out here unions are required on the hot and cold connections to the heater. i also install 1 on the prv. as santa monica requires it.

                          rick.
                          Don't your flex lines count as unions?

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                          • #14
                            Re: Thanks

                            yes they are. but i noticed on your install you don't have unions. not even a brass nipple to help with electrolysis.

                            rick.
                            phoebe it is

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                            • #15
                              Re: Thanks

                              Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                              yes they are. but i noticed on your install you don't have unions. not even a brass nipple to help with electrolysis.

                              rick.
                              Look closer, the press fip are brass

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