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What can a homeowner do?

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  • #31
    Re: What can a homeowner do?

    Originally posted by ironranger View Post
    The only advice I will give you is do it the right way, there is a process. Don't get caught moonlighting, if you do you will throw your chance of a license out the window. Good luck.
    In some states, the only reason why they will deny you a license is to commit a construction related felony. If you get caught contracting without a license(a misdemeanor) you still can get your license. In fact if you can show good faith that you are getting your license after you get caught, the penalties and consequences are significantly less.
    We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

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    • #32
      Re: What can a homeowner do?

      Here √* homeowner Can only plumb their own houses with th√© apropriate permits and inspections but in order to get √* pass He must prove competence " which basically leaves it up to th√© inspectors discetion. All apologies for my spelling. Seanyy
      Last edited by seanny deep; 10-03-2011, 11:55 PM.

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      • #33
        Re: What can a homeowner do?

        Originally posted by seanny deep View Post
        Here √* homeowner Can only plumb their own houses with th√© apropriate permits and inspections but in order to get √* pass He must prove competence " which basically leaves it up to th√© inspectors discetion. All apologies for my spelling. Seanyy

        That is how it is here and was when I was in Texas. Only plumbing I know a home owner can't do is to get Natural Gas turn back on a home. Gas company requires a licensed plumber to get the gas back on. Pretty much all other aspects of plumbing can be done by the Homeowner as long as proper permits and inspections are passed.
        Will Rogers Plumbing
        Moore, Oklahoma
        (
        405) 323-2852

        "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

        "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



        www.willrogersplumbing.com
        http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

        "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

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        • #34
          Re: What can a homeowner do?

          The rule can be tricky and here's why. first off, it's an existing structure in most states the homeowner is allowed to do his own plumbing provided it has been properly permitted and inspected. If it's a new home that's being built, the homeowner does not technically own it until it has been closed by the bank, and the occupancy permit has been issued. Rarely however is this contested.
          sigpic

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          • #35
            Re: What can a homeowner do?

            Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
            The rule can be tricky and here's why. first off, it's an existing structure in most states the homeowner is allowed to do his own plumbing provided it has been properly permitted and inspected. If it's a new home that's being built, the homeowner does not technically own it until it has been closed by the bank, and the occupancy permit has been issued. Rarely however is this contested.
            Probably even more rare is a non plumber home buyer getting a new house built requesting to plumb it.
            That would be awesome to see someone that doesn't know anything about plumbing except what the DIY channel told them to do, trying to plumb a new house.

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            • #36
              Re: What can a homeowner do?

              Here If Its √* " homeowner" build as in they pulled all th√© permits they cant sell that house for atleast five years dont qoute me on that might be longer that prevents people doing shoty work and selling it as a new build atleast they have to deal with their own shiity stuff for a few years.

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              • #37
                Re: What can a homeowner do?

                Actually got a reply from the chief inspector, yesterday I think. OKC

                "The answers you are looking for are in the OKC code supplement. I think they still sell it at the permit counter. The new one will be out when we get the 09 code adopted. Homeowners can do faucet repairs, replace a sink faucet, pull a closet and put it back minor repairs. thanks" -Bill Jackson

                Wonder if every city has this supplement. I just found out today, that Norman, OK will FAIL you if you pipe the PAN DRAIN in anything but CPVC.
                I think I will start charging double in Norman, they are horrendous.

                Odd thing is though, they will let you discharge the T&P directly to a pvc drain. Not pipe it in pvc, just discharge your pex/copper/cpvc straight into the pvc dwv system. How contradicting.

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                • #38
                  Re: What can a homeowner do?

                  There is a very good reason for not running the t&p discharge line in pvc and most plumbers know why, most homeowners do not. Regular pvc is not rated for hot water residential usage, cpvc, pex, copper is.

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                  • #39
                    Re: What can a homeowner do?

                    Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                    There is a very good reason for not running the t&p discharge line in pvc and most plumbers know why, most homeowners do not. Regular pvc is not rated for hot water residential usage, cpvc, pex, copper is.
                    Again. Not in pvc. TO pvc. Re read last sentence

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                    • #40
                      Re: What can a homeowner do?

                      Originally posted by stolen View Post
                      Again. Not in pvc. TO pvc. Re read last sentence
                      How do they say you can directly connect a water heater t&p into a sewer system? Wouldn't that create a possible contamination problem? Never heard of that one before.

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                      • #41
                        Re: What can a homeowner do?

                        I will piss eveyrone off and say, I will do what ever I want to/in my house and if you dont like it tuff cookies.

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                        • #42
                          Re: What can a homeowner do?

                          Directly, as in indirect. Figured I wouldn't have to directly break this down, but I forget which SPECIFIC one it's calling for when connecting a T&P to a drain, so I overkill. Air gap.
                          I asked the inspector directly, where can I discharge my t/p to? He asked, is there a drain? Yes. Then dump it to the drain. While in this case it happened to be cast iron he didn't specify if it was pvc it had to go to the pan.

                          I always found this odd, since pvc is not rated for the temp t/p discharge is (if it happens to pop for temp) but they make us dump our t/p there. But the pan drain has to be CPVC. El oh el.

                          It's as if the cpvc is some magical barrier. It somehow drops the temperature of water shooting through it to be safe enough for pvc.

                          But I just googled and pulled this up
                          What are the temperature limitations of PVC pipe?
                          The maximum use temperature for PVC pressure pipe is 140 degrees F. PVC DWV piping readily withstands the hot and cold water discharges that are normally associated with plumbing fixtures

                          I don't think t/p discharge is really considered "normal discharge"

                          I was told by my boss.... that the reason they make you pipe the pan with cpvc is because the water may be too hot for pvc.

                          For this to be a issue is absurd. If the tank is leaking, it is just leaking water that is at normal temperature (heated of course) and there is no way it is any more dangerous to the pvc pan drain, than it is to the pvc dwv. That same temperature water goes to my shower, but is to dangerous for a pan drain. I heart plumbing.

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                          • #43
                            Re: What can a homeowner do?

                            A lot of good points. You also have to remember that a t&p usually discharges for two reasons, temperature or pressure. When a t&p discharges because of temperature the water normally is around 210 degrees, not 140.

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                            • #44
                              Re: What can a homeowner do?

                              Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                              A lot of good points. You also have to remember that a t&p usually discharges for two reasons, temperature or pressure. When a t&p discharges because of temperature the water normally is around 210 degrees, not 140.
                              Lots of time it's thermal expansion. I add a lot of expansion tanks. Wash. State expansion tanks are mandatory on W.HTRS. ! They have it right
                              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                              • #45
                                Re: What can a homeowner do?

                                The IPC does not specifically prohibit running a T&P to a PVC drain because the thought is that a leaking T&P is not a continuous discharge to the drain.
                                sigpic

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