Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

    Originally posted by Flux View Post
    The worst possible thing a customer could possibly say to me.
    Strange, the thing I like hearing least of all is "I can't pay you."

    I hate it when a customer files chapter 7 bankruptcy and I haven't filed a mechanics lien. (very seldom bother with that)
    Time flies like an arrow.

    Fruit flies like a banana.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

      Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
      Strange, the thing I like hearing least of all is "I can't pay you."
      I've had a few say that up front to me but with a little more added on to it... "I can't pay you in full right now, would you mind that I make payments to you?" I have more respect for a customer who is up front about not being able to pay me..who wants to make payments if I accept that, than someone trying to defraud me.

      We absolutely accept payments from those people up against it in life.

      Never had someone say "I can't pay you at all".

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

        I charge more for a holes. Just like I charge more for tougher jobs. The customer is part of the job. And if they are going to make things worse on me, I charge. Plus guaranteed cheap skates will complain about something. So its whatever.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

          how about this one . i have such and such problem . it like 1 hours worth of work ....i ask them what do you do for a living . The last one was a school teacher ....

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

            Originally posted by stolen View Post
            I charge more for a holes. Just like I charge more for tougher jobs. The customer is part of the job. And if they are going to make things worse on me, I charge. Plus guaranteed cheap skates will complain about something. So its whatever.
            Most, not all contractors throw on a "a$$hole charge", and if they say they don't they are lying.

            If I don't want to work for someone anymore cause they are a pain in the *** or arrogant, I price myself right out of any future work with them.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

              I cut no slack with my pain in the neck customers when I am figuring the bill, I stop short of billing for the breath I breathe. ( I will charge for every screw, every wire nut, every staple, every sliver of sandpaper) If it takes XX hours, I charge for XX hours even if I felt it should have taken X hours.

              On the other hand, customers who are not a pain in the neck get charged for how long I think the job should have taken, if the delay was my fault somehow.
              We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                I have often told clients this is my rate, if you want to watch it's double, if you want to help it's triple. Not that it matter because they still stood over my shoulder and I still charged the normal rate. I don't disagree with an additional charge for the difficult people out there. In those cases I will bill at normal rate but charge for every bit of time involved and every part possible. Being in a small area word of mouth travels fast! If 3 of my clients are talking, the last thing I want is them comparing different labor rates. Someone that is beyond my desire to work with is very simply told at the end of the job "You will need to find another service provider."

                I don't think most clients are upset with us as much as they are the situation. Generally if a person is taking their anger out on me, the one there to help them, I will quietly start packing my tools. When they see I'm about to leave them and their issues behind that attitude changes.

                There are those that are just simply azzholes, born that way and going to die that way. I see no issue for them to cover a surcharge for their existence or be limited to who will work with them.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                  If a customer says a doctor doesnt make that much. I reply they bill 500 to 1000 per hour rolled up in a procedureal name so the hourly cost is hidden. The doctor doesnt make 1000/hr himself and neither do I make 100/hr myself. I also like to rattle off about 5 overhead expenses that customers dont typicaly expect. In dealing with customers that feel my job is "easy", I dont raise the price. I itemize eery part, not to run up the tab but to emphazise how many trips to the store the customer would have had to make. I list 3 to 5 codes I followed, again to build value. I increase my warranty, to build value. Then I express my willingness to leave and let them get bids. I practicaly make then ask me to stay. If they do have me do the work I find something small to do for free, again building value. I also always find something small to suggest as additional work casualy. What im driving at here is that we need to hear the customer. They are saying, with there off handed remarks, "I dont see the value in what your doing"... Show them the value and you will get a customer that will recommend you everywhere.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                    Originally posted by Flux View Post
                    The worst possible thing a customer could possibly say to me.

                    I just smile and tell them "I have the time"
                    ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                      Originally posted by money in jetting View Post
                      If a customer says a doctor doesnt make that much. I reply they bill 500 to 1000 per hour rolled up in a procedureal name so the hourly cost is hidden. The doctor doesnt make 1000/hr himself and neither do I make 100/hr myself. I also like to rattle off about 5 overhead expenses that customers dont typicaly expect. In dealing with customers that feel my job is "easy", I dont raise the price. I itemize eery part, not to run up the tab but to emphazise how many trips to the store the customer would have had to make. I list 3 to 5 codes I followed, again to build value. I increase my warranty, to build value. Then I express my willingness to leave and let them get bids. I practicaly make then ask me to stay. If they do have me do the work I find something small to do for free, again building value. I also always find something small to suggest as additional work casualy. What im driving at here is that we need to hear the customer. They are saying, with there off handed remarks, "I dont see the value in what your doing"... Show them the value and you will get a customer that will recommend you everywhere.
                      I think I have set through one of the training seminars you are quoting or where you the teacher? It's ok! New construction plumbers have a rough time working on the old stuff too. No doubt you work in a flat rate shop. I left a flat rate shop so I could sleep at night. What you are calling value, I call taking advantage. That's still ok. Because when my customers say I am to high, I have them call you guys and I sell the job 100% of the time.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                        Have this old bat of a customer.Nuttier than a fruitcake..Anyhow showed up there to snake a kitchen .She sat at the kitchen table and would not stop running her mouth.Figured shes lonely and all.Every time I turned around to answer a question and talk back she made comments about how she needed to stop talking and to just keep working because she was slowing me down and the bill was going to be more .Snaked the kitchen drain and had to replace the chrome trap.Finished up handed her the bill and next to parts chrome trap -N/C . I didn't even charge her for the chrome trap..The next time she called me she made the comment that my last bill was kinda high. I told her well there is no way my bill was any higher than this and I replaced the trap and didn't charge you.She returned with the receipt and an apology and said I billed her$50 less than what I normally charge..Theres a good chance I made a comment that if she needed fo find a cheaper plumber in the future I understand
                        Last edited by OLD1; 10-20-2011, 10:28 PM.
                        ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                          Im not sure what it is that your reading into. National flat rate shops are succesful, look at horizon services 35million/year and several others. I cant sleep at night if I cant pay my overhead and make a wage and benefits package like I would as a top notch employee. I have picked up alot of very usefull insights over the years and I choose to use them for good. You find value builders as takeing advantage? Maybee the shop you were in used some value builders for less than honorable intentions, maybee you would impute the same character on me. Maybee your customers dealings with unprofessional handymen(posing as plumbers) has caused them to think that you are one of them. I think its important for you to distinguish yourself above the customers past experiences, how do you do that without value building techniques. Keep in mind im not advocating any dishonesty or misleading customers.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                            This thread has potential!!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                              I do it with being honest with my clients, present all the options, and fix that old unit if they wish. I also maybe have a 1-2% go back rate. I will spend time with the client to make sure they understand everything they want to. Oh and the client knows I will stand behind my work. Just yesterday one of my clients saw me in the bank. She ran up to give a hug and chat for a moment. I'm comfortable that my clients see a lot of value and that is I am more interested in their needs. I quit worring about being able to pay the bills or put food on the table for the kids. I found that to be a waste of energy. If you just honestly take care of your client, all the rest just works out.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Business ethics: bidding a homeowner

                                Hey Jones, I wish I could have your same "things will work out attitude". I follow business pretty closely. The out of business statistics are crazy. The other tradesmen at the wholesalers talking about how they would be better off working for someone else resounds all over the place. Ill bet you dont make very good money, your well liked, you get lots of referals.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X