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  • #16
    Re: water pipe sizing

    So according to that table thé minimum pressure required for thé house is 15 psi because Thats thé highest minimum pressure ? I wouldnt want more then that 102 psi wouldnt Have to be regulated to below 80 So im confused. Are u sûre u read thé table correctly ?

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    • #17
      Re: water pipe sizing

      Originally posted by seanny deep View Post
      So according to that table thé minimum pressure required for thé house is 15 psi because Thats thé highest minimum pressure ? I wouldnt want more then that 102 psi wouldnt Have to be regulated to below 80 So im confused. Are u sûre u read thé table correctly ?
      If I could print the table I would.

      Let's look at what the guy is installing in the house..

      2 - outside faucets

      5 - sinks

      2 - showers

      1 bathtub

      Now I'm sure there is a washing machine & dishwasher also included, but he forgot those. So when you design a water distribution system you take every fixture into account even though it would be very rare that ALL would be on at the same time. If they ALL were on at the same time, his water service volume would have to handle 2,500 feet @ around 30 g.p.m / 102 psi. Each fixture has a required g.p.m. /p.s.i. according to code.

      1 outside faucet = 5 g.p.m. 8psi flow pressure...he's going to have 2 so that's 10gpm & 16 psi

      1 sink = 2 g.p.m. 8 psi flow pressure and he's going to have 5 of them and that's 10 g.p.m. & 40 psi

      1 shower = 3 g.p.m. 8 psi flow pressure and he's going to have 2 of them so that's 6 g.p.m. & 16psi

      1 tub = 4 g.p.m. 8 psi flow pressure and he's only going to have 1 so that's 4 gpm 8 psi.

      I have quite a few customers in where they need 100psi coming into the house to adequately supply all of the Plumbing fixtures and obstacles they have on the outside. Also keep in mind most pressure reducing valves are rated @ 300psi maximum working pressure.

      My point is this...I don't think 2" would be enough to supply this house. I'm leaning more towards what Rick said and saying 3" - 4" pipe would be more suitable. If it were me, I would be installing a fire hydrant along the way. Being that I was a fireman before, no fire trucks carry 2,500 feet of fire hose, and a tanker would have to be dispatched to this house if heaven forbid there is a fire. The pump on that fire truck would suck a 2" line dry.
      Last edited by Flux; 01-24-2012, 08:47 PM. Reason: add on

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      • #18
        Re: water pipe sizing

        okay so this is very helpful. i forgot to add in the washing machine disher washer and hot water tank. kinda figured that was a givin for a new house now a days lol. so the only reason i have not considered putting in a fire hydrant is because of the proximity of two ponds within a couple hundred of yards to the house. so if i had to go with a pipe anywhere from 2-4 inch that kinda limits what type of pipe i could use correct?

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        • #19
          Re: water pipe sizing

          Originally posted by Marino7213 View Post
          okay so this is very helpful. i forgot to add in the washing machine disher washer and hot water tank. kinda figured that was a givin for a new house now a days lol. so the only reason i have not considered putting in a fire hydrant is because of the proximity of two ponds within a couple hundred of yards to the house. so if i had to go with a pipe anywhere from 2-4 inch that kinda limits what type of pipe i could use correct?
          Well 2 ponds sure does change things up a bit as a fire truck has "drafting" capabilities, so a fire hydrant wouldn't be needed then.

          You should find out what the supply pressure is where you're going to tie in at... before you determine what size pipe. My personal opinion is...I think 2" "might" not be enough, and it would force you to install a booster inside the house.

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          • #20
            Re: water pipe sizing

            well here is another point. if i remember right when i called the water department the biggest tap (meter) that i could get was either a 1 1/4 or 1 1/2. so i know i dont know a lot about this but what good does it do to install a service pipe that is bigger then your tap? and if it can down to it wouldnt it be cheaper to go with a smaller pipe and install a booster pump then go with a 3 or 4" pipe?

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            • #21
              Re: water pipe sizing

              Originally posted by Marino7213 View Post
              well here is another point. if i remember right when i called the water department the biggest tap (meter) that i could get was either a 1 1/4 or 1 1/2. so i know i dont know a lot about this but what good does it do to install a service pipe that is bigger then your tap? and if it can down to it wouldnt it be cheaper to go with a smaller pipe and install a booster pump then go with a 3 or 4" pipe?
              A few years ago when we ran 750 ft straight up a mountain side, we tapped into an 1 1/4" meter pit and ran 2" Poly out the other side of it. Now I don't remember what the pressure was at the meter pit, but we had 72psi at the house with no pressure reducing valve.

              2,500ft is a very long way to think about being on the cheap side of things, yes you can't admire a pipe that's underground, but you will sleep well at night knowing that you put the right size pipe in the ground. A booster pump is only 1 more thing that can break and something you have to replace down the road. But yes..you can install one.

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              • #22
                Re: water pipe sizing

                i will definately take that into consideration. i didnt mean to come across that i wanted to do this "cheap" i just didnt want to spend 10,000 on i ya know? i appreciate all of the helpful tips

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                • #23
                  Re: water pipe sizing

                  what would it cost to have a well drilled in your area as compared to running that long of a line.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: water pipe sizing

                    Try not to over think this thing and try to get a handle on your pressure first. Regardless of your fixture count you can't do anything until you know your supply pressure. Pressure is not based on pipe size, it based on elevation less friction. You need to start by figuring out the elevation difference between your father's lot and your lot. Once you have those figures, one foot of elevation is .433 psi. You say the majority of the line will be downhill but you don't say by how much. Assuming just a 1/4" per foot for the entire 2,500' would be an elevation change of 52'. Now you take 52' X .433 psi + 90 psi and you would have a supply pressure of 112.5 psi less friction. If instead the slope was 1" per foot you would have 208' X .433 psi + 90 psi and you would have a supply pressure of 180 psi less friction. The friction loss will be based on the materials you use, total distance and the number of fittings. If you have a decent topo you may be able to use that to figure the elevation change. I was able to use a topo from a spring we have to a Frost-Free Hydrant 5-miles away. I figured 86 psi and we ended up with 83 psi. Some might have been friction and some might have been a miscalculation of the elevation but it was close enough for me.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: water pipe sizing

                      Also for every hill that you go up, you have to subtract 0.433psi for every vertical foot, and there is 100ft of hill he has to go through.

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                      • #26
                        Re: water pipe sizing

                        Originally posted by Flux View Post
                        Also for every hill that you go up, you have to subtract 0.433psi for every vertical foot, and there is 100ft of hill he has to go through.
                        That's why I left it to change in elevation. I like to use elevation X .433 but others prefer elevation divided by 2.31. Either way you end up with the same answer.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: water pipe sizing

                          Originally posted by G3sprinklers View Post
                          what would it cost to have a well drilled in your area as compared to running that long of a line.
                          I agree. If he can drill a well that would be the best option.

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