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  • Toilet Flange

    I had to set a toilet today, and the brass flange (soldered to copper) had absolutely no screws in it, and the toilet rocked worse than a rocking chair. The majority of the time, I can find some wood to screw into, but this situation was a little different than what I'm use to seeing.

    The tile was under the flange, and underneath was wet-bed...barely any wood for me to get into.

    Wall plugs and screws where out of the question, but my question is, what else is on the market for these types of situations?

    I don't like depending on those hard plastic shims and caulk...I hell bent on the flange needs to be secure. There was nothing leaking that rotted wood out or anything, I just think when this house was build, the Plumber cut to large of a hole.

  • #2
    Re: Toilet Flange

    Is sub floor concrete or plywood?
    Last edited by Plumbus; 04-18-2012, 05:08 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Toilet Flange

      1/4" bolts through the subfloor and nut/washers under the subfloor. Obviously try and find something that won't rust. I double nut mine. Worst case, same thing but with some treated 3/4" strips of wood to get some meat under the subfloor.
      AllurePlumbing.com
      • leak detection
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      Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

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      • #4
        Re: Toilet Flange

        Plywood subfloor I'm sure, and this is on the second floor of a home.

        I barely caught wood, but it was good enough for me as the flange didn't move at all.

        But when I used my power drill through the flange holes- through the tile and wet bed, I should of stopped on wood, and I didn't...there was nothing there except in 2 places around the flange that I drilled. The plumber who set the flange did a beautiful job, but he didn't use any screws whatsoever.

        Gettinit, I think the customer would of had a heart attack if I cut the drywall down stairs and went that way to secure the flange.

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        • #5
          Re: Toilet Flange

          If the flange moved this would cause leaks....cut now or later? They would've dealt with it or found someone else. The fact that it was solid is great for you, small miracles.

          I
          AllurePlumbing.com
          • leak detection
          • drain cleaning
          • utility locating
          • conductor fault locating
          • and other specialties.

          Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

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          • #6
            Re: Toilet Flange

            Originally posted by Flux View Post
            I had to set a toilet today, and the brass flange (soldered to copper) had absolutely no screws in it, and the toilet rocked worse than a rocking chair. The majority of the time, I can find some wood to screw into, but this situation was a little different than what I'm use to seeing.

            The tile was under the flange, and underneath was wet-bed...barely any wood for me to get into.

            Wall plugs and screws where out of the question, but my question is, what else is on the market for these types of situations?

            I don't like depending on those hard plastic shims and caulk...I hell bent on the flange needs to be secure. There was nothing leaking that rotted wood out or anything, I just think when this house was build, the Plumber cut to large of a hole.

            Flux,

            I don't know what the custom is in your area but around here when the floor is "wet set" I presume you're referring to what is called a "floated" floor here. The cement part of the floor sits on wood cribbing usually 1x something, and many times there are gaps in the cribbing. Sometimes but not always there's steel lathe for the cement to grab.

            When I have to screw down a flange in these situations and can't access the ceiling below because it's finished, I'll try and use 1/4" 2-1/2" countersunk tapcons and point them out angularly as far away from the flange as I can manage. I use a non hammering drill to start if it will work. (Normally will). It's not as fast but you're less likely to spall out somewhere.

            Primarily depending on the quality of the floor it works more often than not.
            Time flies like an arrow.

            Fruit flies like a banana.

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            • #7
              Re: Toilet Flange

              Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
              Flux,

              I don't know what the custom is in your area but around here when the floor is "wet set" I presume you're referring to what is called a "floated" floor here. The cement part of the floor sits on wood cribbing usually 1x something, and many times there are gaps in the cribbing. Sometimes but not always there's steel lathe for the cement to grab.

              When I have to screw down a flange in these situations and can't access the ceiling below because it's finished, I'll try and use 1/4" 2-1/2" countersunk tapcons and point them out angularly as far away from the flange as I can manage. I use a non hammering drill to start if it will work. (Normally will). It's not as fast but you're less likely to spall out somewhere.

              Primarily depending on the quality of the floor it works more often than not.
              No, we are talking about the same thing, but around here people say "wet bed". I've known it by that since I was a kid, and have no clue what the proper term is on that. I'll have to look for those tapcons next time I'm in the home depot or lowes.

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              • #8
                Re: Toilet Flange

                You could have tried using tapcon screws

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Toilet Flange

                  Originally posted by Flux View Post
                  I had to set a toilet today, and the brass flange (soldered to copper) had absolutely no screws in it, and the toilet rocked worse than a rocking chair. The majority of the time, I can find some wood to screw into, but this situation was a little different than what I'm use to seeing.

                  The tile was under the flange, and underneath was wet-bed...barely any wood for me to get into.

                  Wall plugs and screws where out of the question, but my question is, what else is on the market for these types of situations?

                  I don't like depending on those hard plastic shims and caulk...I hell bent on the flange needs to be secure. There was nothing leaking that rotted wood out or anything, I just think when this house was build, the Plumber cut to large of a hole.

                  Hey man im from california and have not EVER seen or heard about what your saying... if i am understanding you correctly you guys have brass or copper closet flanges? over here we have stainless steel or abs or cast flanges.... never seen one can you describe it to me please. pictures would be awesome too.....

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                  • #10
                    Re: Toilet Flange

                    Originally posted by Matt T Service and Repair View Post
                    Hey man im from california and have not EVER seen or heard about what your saying... if i am understanding you correctly you guys have brass or copper closet flanges? over here we have stainless steel or abs or cast flanges.... never seen one can you describe it to me please. pictures would be awesome too.....
                    We have every single type of toilet flange known to man kind installed out here in Pennsylvania. ABS -PVC -COPPER -BRASS -C.I. -STEEL you name it.

                    I didn't take a picture today, and for the life of me, I can't find an example online of what it looked like. This house was built 40 years ago, and the Plumber used an extremely thick (think of how a C.I. flange looks) heavy brass cast toilet flange. The brass flanges today that I see in the supply houses are extremely thin and nothing like what I saw today. I've seen quite a few of these flanges throughout my career around here. You never know what you're going to run into around here, and you have to be prepared for everything.

                    A few years ago I got called out to re-seal a toilet...no big deal. I get to the job and a landlord owns the apartment building and it's a sh*thole! I look at the toilet and instantly I knew something was wrong...I sucked the water out, unhooked the supply, and lifted the toilet (no bolts) and there is just a cast iron pipe with no flange!

                    Yea...that was a fun job.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Toilet Flange

                      The Lowest hardware around here stocks a 4" cast iron flange. It uses bolts and a gasket to seal the outside of the pipe. It has worked out well for me.
                      AllurePlumbing.com
                      • leak detection
                      • drain cleaning
                      • utility locating
                      • conductor fault locating
                      • and other specialties.

                      Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

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                      • #12
                        Re: Toilet Flange

                        I don't like doing it, but if all else fails and the home owner won't pay to the proper repair to be made, use this stuff. BTW, good luck getting it up, you will have to take a hammer to it to get it up!!! E-6100

                        E-6100 Industrial Strength Adhesives

                        http://www.epiindustrial.com/
                        Last edited by Will Rogers Plumbing; 04-19-2012, 09:03 AM.
                        Will Rogers Plumbing
                        Moore, Oklahoma
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                        405) 323-2852

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                        • #13
                          Re: Toilet Flange

                          I agree. At the risk of sounding like a hack, fast setting epoxies have come a long way. I use anchoring epoxy for fixture carriers, and horizontal anchoring when you want to drill a smaller diameter hole.

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