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  • #31
    Re: busting concrete

    Originally posted by dlarrivee View Post
    OkieBill...

    Amazon.com: DEWALT DW861W 4.5-Inch Wet/Dry Masonry Saw: Home Improvement

    Is that tool not meant to be used by a human either?

    Obviously it is and designed for a specific job... cutting countertops, 4.5" blade cuts 2" deep so what cuts the next 2-6"???

    I guess I will keep it simple...

    Tool designed to be used with water =OK, rigging a garden hose to an angle grinder to cut on a verticle plane NOT OK / Death

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: busting concrete

      Originally posted by blue_can View Post
      Last reply - I actually have a plumbing project to work on this morning

      As far as credentials (on this particular aspect of the topic) I do a lot of stone fab and I also belong to the Stone Fabricators Alliance - a professional trade organization of stone fabricators - so I know a lot about wet tools and how to use them. I also own a lot of them including the ones I showed in the links I posted.

      On that note I will head out to sweat some copper pipes
      Proof or it's just more bad advice and lies Mr. Sanitation Engineer...

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: busting concrete

        Gentlemen. I think I wasn't very clear what I was looking for.

        The holes are small. Boss won't but a jack hammer, plus is usually only three small holes per job. and I've noticed what makes it so bad is when you are digging around in the broken concrete, it filters down between the bigger chunks of rock making them harder and harder to get out. So would a shop vac actually aid in this process by not allowing the small chunks to fall into the space between the big chunks?

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: busting concrete

          Originally posted by stolen View Post
          So i'm working for a new construction shop nowadays. And piss on me ground crews are still sticking it to the top out guys.

          So here is my question. Do shop vacs make removing busted up concrete any easier?
          With the proper tools and safety it will aid you by keeping the mess to a minimum, whether you are using water or not. If its a hole 6" or smaller I wouldn't dream of using anything but a core bit....no fuss no muss. Trying to use a shop vac instead of a shovel is a waste of time in my opinion. If the hole is too small to use a shovel, again, core drill.
          AllurePlumbing.com
          • leak detection
          • drain cleaning
          • utility locating
          • conductor fault locating
          • and other specialties.

          Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: busting concrete

            Wrong boss, keep looking!
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: busting concrete

              Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
              Please enlighten me with your evidence on how to cut and break concrete effectively. Here are a few of mine...

















              I do the same as You Bill. One Brute, two Makita Hammers,one 14" Hilti gas saw. Real tools for real Men!
              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: busting concrete

                Originally posted by stolen View Post
                Gentlemen. I think I wasn't very clear what I was looking for.

                The holes are small. Boss won't but a jack hammer, plus is usually only three small holes per job. and I've noticed what makes it so bad is when you are digging around in the broken concrete, it filters down between the bigger chunks of rock making them harder and harder to get out. So would a shop vac actually aid in this process by not allowing the small chunks to fall into the space between the big chunks?
                I think it may, but you can always try it and if it does not work at lest you then know, I would think to come up with a vacuum to try it out with would not be that hard, it is kinda like Edison working on the light bulb,
                When Thomas Edison was interviewed by a young reporter who boldly asked Mr. Edison if he felt like a failure and if he thought he should just give up by now. Perplexed, Edison replied, "Young man, why would I feel like a failure? And why would I ever give up? I now know definitively over 9,000 ways that an electric light bulb will not work. Success is almost in my grasp." And shortly after that, and over 10,000 attempts, Edison invented the light bulb.
                when your done you either know of a way that helps or one that does not,
                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                attributed to Samuel Johnson
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: busting concrete

                  fyi, i do a lot of concrete cutting and core drilling. everything from gas to electric from 12'' coring down. even upside down/ inverted. core drilling. all my tools are setup for water both gas and electric. that being said, using an electric saw or angle grinder can be done wet with a little bit of caution. the object is not to over wet the blade. actually too much water will slow down the cut as the diamond matrix will not get exposed fast enough to allow for proper cutting.

                  my biggest electric saw is a 14'' blade, 5'' depth (while my gas saws are up to 16'', 6'' depth and chain saw 12'' deep cutting). but it draws over 20 amps under load and is all but useless unless you have a generator or 30 amp circuit. a 7 1/4'' skill saw with a 7'' blade will easily cut 2.5'' deep. with a blade guard, there is little water being exposed to the electrical. same goes true with a 4.5'' grinder. the blade guard will deflect water away from the motor. also most tools now are non metallic handles and bodies. i too own wet cutting and polishing saws and grinders for stone. they come factory installed for wet cutting.

                  with all the cutting i do for myself and others indoors and outdoors, i've never been shocked beyond a slight buzz and i've never ruined an electric tool due to water. with common sense and decent tools, wet cutting can be done safely. i even use a spray bottle for small work with my grinder and saw. of course rubber gloves are a good idea along with eye and ear protection.

                  rick.
                  Last edited by PLUMBER RICK; 06-09-2012, 11:57 PM.
                  phoebe it is

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: busting concrete

                    Originally posted by stokefire7 View Post
                    You could also drill it.
                    That's what I was saying, your photo makes it clear to someone who could not picture what I was saying.
                    If you don't have a steady diet of concrete holes its probably the easiest way and least
                    expensive option, as well as minimal mess. Just need earplugs and a GFCI and drill stop on the drill in case you hit some
                    buried conduit in or under the slab. The drill stop will shut down the drill (or core bore machine) if you hit any grounded
                    metal in the slab. This includes rebar but at the point you don't know what it is right? Some jobs you can't cut thru
                    rebar without an OK from Engineer, maybe not residential or light commercial, but in a high rise or industrial setting.
                    Last edited by Bob D.; 06-10-2012, 06:43 AM.
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                    ---------
                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: busting concrete

                      "I've never been shocked beyond a slight buzz"

                      Rick, Of all people you know there is the right tool for the job so to somehow endorse rigging a garden hose to an angle grinder for cutting flat concrete does not make sense.

                      Yes, there are a plethora of specialty electric countertop tools that use water no one is disputing that fact. Are any of the shown counter top tools suitable of cutting 4"-6" thick concrete slabs, NO

                      If somebody would be so kind as to show me a HANDHELD ELECTRIC WET SAW DESIGNED to CUT 4" to 6" CONCRETE with a UL rating, because I'm gonna give you a hint just because a company imports a tool that does not make it legal to use in the USA (That goes for A LOT of the wet counter top tools).

                      The Sanitation Engineer (Blue_can) needs to follow his own advice before he starts dispensing his ill educated guesses around on the internet and gets somebody hurt.


                      --Why not just recommend a tool that will get the job done efficiently and safely???

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: busting concrete

                        Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
                        "I've never been shocked beyond a slight buzz"

                        Rick, Of all people you know there is the right tool for the job so to somehow endorse rigging a garden hose to an angle grinder for cutting flat concrete does not make sense.

                        Yes, there are a plethora of specialty electric countertop tools that use water no one is disputing that fact. Are any of the shown counter top tools suitable of cutting 4"-6" thick concrete slabs, NO

                        If somebody would be so kind as to show me a HANDHELD ELECTRIC WET SAW DESIGNED to CUT 4" to 6" CONCRETE with a UL rating, because I'm gonna give you a hint just because a company imports a tool that does not make it legal to use in the USA (That goes for A LOT of the wet counter top tools).

                        The Sanitation Engineer (Blue_can) needs to follow his own advice before he starts dispensing his ill educated guesses around on the internet and gets somebody hurt.


                        --Why not just recommend a tool that will get the job done efficiently and safely???
                        Unfortunately you continue to show ignorance in this area. A lot of the wet tools used in stone shops are hand rigged and the tools sold with water feeds do not undergo a special certification process. Many stone shops using such tools are inspected and cleared by OSHA. You can create a tool that is identical to the pre-made tools by using the same hose (Loc-line).

                        All you have done is to look foolish with what you posed. First it was no water around electric tools. When I showed you an example of such a tool it was how it was not an example of a tool to cut in the vertical plane. You even told me - a stone fabber - that such a tool did not exist.

                        When you were shown more examples it turned to how you could not cut to the necessary depth and put up photos of howyou bust concrete which is beside the point.

                        Do you really think calling me a sanitation engineer bolsters your argument. Instead it says a whole lot about you.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: busting concrete

                          I like how Mr. Safety posted a picture of a dude using a LOUD 2stroke Stihl saw without glasses or hearing protection.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: busting concrete

                            Originally posted by blue_can View Post
                            Unfortunately you continue to show ignorance in this area. A lot of the wet tools used in stone shops are hand rigged and the tools sold with water feeds do not undergo a special certification process. Many stone shops using such tools are inspected and cleared by OSHA. You can create a tool that is identical to the pre-made tools by using the same hose (Loc-line).

                            All you have done is to look foolish with what you posed. First it was no water around electric tools. When I showed you an example of such a tool it was how it was not an example of a tool to cut in the vertical plane. You even told me - a stone fabber - that such a tool did not exist.

                            When you were shown more examples it turned to how you could not cut to the necessary depth and put up photos of howyou bust concrete which is beside the point.

                            Do you really think calling me a sanitation engineer bolsters your argument. Instead it says a whole lot about you.

                            Sorry Mr. Sanitation Engineer,

                            I was talking to Rick not you, I have made a good faith attempt to show you the error of your ways. Your selective reading and failure to answer the questions posted show a true ingorance.

                            It is evident based on your suggestion and continued bruised ego that you are neither a plumber nor have you ever broken concrete in any significant manner.

                            --WHY SUGGEST A RIG JOB THAT WILL PLACE SOMEONE IN DANGER?

                            --PLEASE SHOW A HANDHELD ELECTRIC WET SAW DESIGNED to CUT 4" to 6" CONCRETE with a UL rating (The reason there is not one proves my point)

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: busting concrete

                              Originally posted by dlarrivee View Post
                              I like how Mr. Safety posted a picture of a dude using a LOUD 2stroke Stihl saw without glasses or hearing protection.
                              Sorry I hurt your feelings dlarrivee...

                              That's all you got? Safety Glasses and hearing protection??

                              Anything even slightly relevant to add?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: busting concrete

                                Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
                                Sorry Mr. Sanitation Engineer,

                                I was talking to Rick not you, I have made a good faith attempt to show you the error of your ways. Your selective reading and failure to answer the questions posted show a true ingorance.

                                It is evident based on your suggestion and continued bruised ego that you are neither a plumber nor have you ever broken concrete in any significant manner.

                                --WHY SUGGEST A RIG JOB THAT WILL PLACE SOMEONE IN DANGER?

                                --PLEASE SHOW A HANDHELD ELECTRIC WET SAW DESIGNED to CUT 4" to 6" CONCRETE with a UL rating (The reason there is not one proves my point)
                                If there is no wet saw for cutting concrete to that depth in one pass proves nothing about safety. Cutting concrete is cutting concrete. Remember this part of the discussion is about using water near electric tools and how you think it is very dangerous. So now you've brought the depth of the concrete into the discussion.

                                Here's a hint for you - you will always be much closer to sanitation that I ever will

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