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  • "S" Trap????

    Ok, I must just be STUPID. I still don't understand why a combo in a wall is considered to be an "S" trap. You can explain the weir of the trap and other technical terms, but can anyone tell me in english.

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    If I was to pick on something, I would eliminate the use of double santees for lav. sinks. I don't like hearing my cable in the other p-trap thank you.
    "don't put that in your mouth, you don't know where it's been"

  • #2
    Re: "S" Trap????

    on the pic you have on the right, once the water hits that combo, it kills your vent. If the bottom of the outlet side of your trap is higher than the top of the inlet side of your vent, you have an s-trap, my friend. this is why they only let you run pipe only so far before it connects to a vent, depending on your pipe diameter. Double tees are stupid..... especially if the roof is steep

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    • #3
      Re: "S" Trap????

      With a comby, by the time the air has entered and broken the seal, there's not enough water left in the trap to make a seal. With the santee, the air breaks the siphon quicker allowing more water to stay in the trap.
      Buy cheap, buy twice.

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      • #4
        Re: "S" Trap????

        both a comby and a wye and 1/8 bend put the weir of the trap above the vent inlet which does not allow the vent to break the siphon. They make a double fixture san tee that has a baffle in the middle so you cable won't slide through.
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Re: "S" Trap????

          Some of it seems to be theoretical & unproven B.S.

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          • #6
            Re: "S" Trap????

            Got a video somewhere of two drains set up using clear PVC, One with a combo the other with a san-tee. The combo siphons regularly. Nothing theoretical about it.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Re: "S" Trap????

              Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
              Got a video somewhere of two drains set up using clear PVC, One with a combo the other with a san-tee. The combo siphons regularly. Nothing theoretical about it.
              Then why are there strictly enforced trap arm distances that are different between codes?

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              • #8
                Re: "S" Trap????

                Such as? If it is less than trap size divided by slope then it's a more restrictive code. Example: NC code, for a 2'' trap @ 1/4'' per foot = 8'. In 2006 code, it was 6'. What are the differences you speak of?

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                • #9
                  Re: "S" Trap????

                  Originally posted by Plumber26 View Post
                  Such as? If it is less than trap size divided by slope then it's a more restrictive code. Example: NC code, for a 2'' trap @ 1/4'' per foot = 8'. In 2006 code, it was 6'. What are the differences you speak of?
                  The IPC and UPC have different minimum requirements in this category as I recall. (Memory) I believe the UPC was more stringent i.e. less distance allowed before this trap siphonage will supposedly occur. Having different measurements with same IPS & fixtures would seem to prove that the IPC, UPC, or both are incorrect in their requirement.

                  I do not deny trap siphonage & have seen it. I don't recall seeing it however due to trap arm length and have even ran into handyman installs with combinations installed with the horizontal to vertical drop in the curve that will supposedly cause problems. And they had no problems with siphonage.

                  Code is code. However, there are installs that are technically not code working as they are supposed too. And there is enough difference between codes utilizing the same fixtures & pipe materials that strict enforcement of either is wrong.

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                  • #10
                    Re: "S" Trap????

                    Originally posted by Plumber26 View Post
                    Such as? If it is less than trap size divided by slope then it's a more restrictive code. Example: NC code, for a 2'' trap @ 1/4'' per foot = 8'. In 2006 code, it was 6'. What are the differences you speak of?
                    P.S. I told inspectors that it was wrong at 6' in that code and it fell on deaf ears. It was changed to 8' in that table later. Took a class the year it was changed with the CE instructor/inspector stating that, and I quote, "IT WAS A MISPRINT".

                    That's right. The inspectors all over everywhere were strictly enforcing a misprint.

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                    • #11
                      Re: "S" Trap????

                      Both the IPC and the UPC keep trap to vent distance such that at no time will the trap weir be placed above the vent inlet.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Re: "S" Trap????

                        Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                        Both the IPC and the UPC keep trap to vent distance such that at no time will the trap weir be placed above the vent inlet.
                        If this be the case then the UPC is completely wrong to enforce their shorter distance requirement.

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