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  • toolaholic
    started a topic Gas line pressure tests

    Gas line pressure tests

    On My Gas test tomorrow ,I have a cal valve. Seismic gas shut off. It's caped off Just after. Meter disconnected ,of course. I have the Cal valve in the off position and It. all holding 15 Lbs. for Hours. These valves ever leak at 15 Lbs. ?

  • OkieBill
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    I still remember the Tool that stuck a 4" cutter into a 4" Kelly (2-way) and wondered why he got his cable stuck...LOL

    Really though, no sour Grapes, I just love giving tool $hit whenever I can, though I did not realize he was so old so I will stop... Old folks don't need their blood pressure raised up anymore then necessary.

    As a peace offering I will buy the first round of Prune juice

    Leave a comment:


  • NYC LMP
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
    Thanks for that. My work gets signed off in one of the most code enforced places in the Country,San Francisco. Many of the
    inspectors are former Union plumbers. Most G.C. Here that touch plumbing are Hacks, I'm not. Today a long time Lic. plumber is hiring Me to bore Under a slab and install a new 2" drain line. Old one is C.I. rotted. One thing I can't fix, -------
    " sniveling lil winers,suck it up buttercup "
    I am a licensed plumber, and I am in awe of the breadth of jobs Tool has done. I have done the same with other trades, specifically carpentry: commit yourself to learning how to do the job properly, get permits, and have the job tested and inspected. I can't find any posts by Tool to indicate any hack work. There is enough work for everyone who is qualified.
    The kicker is that Tool started these jobs in the 1950's - and he was 55 years old at the time!
    Regards from one of those rude New Yawkers!

    Leave a comment:


  • toolaholic
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Thanks for that. My work gets signed off in one of the most code enforced places in the Country,San Francisco. Many of the
    inspectors are former Union plumbers. Most G.C. Here that touch plumbing are Hacks, I'm not. Today a long time Lic. plumber is hiring Me to bore Under a slab and install a new 2" drain line. Old one is C.I. rotted. One thing I can't fix, -------
    " sniveling lil winers,suck it up buttercup "

    Leave a comment:


  • Cleanmen2
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by blue_can View Post
    I had no idea who invented the manometer but I looked online and apparently it was Otto von Guericke - a German scientist in the 1600s.

    I'm also somewhat prehistoric - I have a cheap $20 water manometer for taking gas pressure readings. I would probably buy a digital one if I did this kind of thing for a living.

    The principle of the water manometer (U-tube manometer) is very simply – you fill a tube open at both ends with water and when both ends are exposed to atmospheric pressure the water level in both is the same. This can also be used as a level.

    If you pressurize one end the water gets pushed up by a certain amount. Here in the US we use “WC to refer to this pressure and that’s the number of “ the water gets pushed up by. In the SI system of course this would be measured in bars or millibars.

    For me in addition to doing the 15# test I also typically use a manometer to check for leaks by pressurizing the system and then shutting the gas off and monitoring the system pressure with the manometer. I also use my manometer to measure the static gas pressure if I need to size gas lines. I have all the gas lines in my home modeled on an Excel spreadsheet. By taking the static gas pressure if I need to add new lines etc I can plug the static pressure into my spreadsheet and size the gas line so that at full flow the pressure at the appliance does not drop below the recommended minimum. It an alternative and more accurate computation than using the gas tables which most people do. My spreadsheet is based on the actual gas flow formula.
    Time for me to behave again. Manometer is the quickest and simplest way of testing for leaks. Visually it is instant. Not taking it away from the digitals though becasue we still use them here too. Gotta be more accurate when setting gas pressures on Infinity units especially after converting from one gas to another. As far as the spreadsheet, might be real accurate but a small percentage more for Just In Case allows for different temperatures and humidity. Always best to be a little bigger than a lot smaller. With the manometer we generally, that is the old guys I mean, work in Inches water guage. 4 inches = 1kpa(1000 pascals). just thought I would add to the thread.
    Now one other thing I gotta say, we have different licenses over here at present. The Big Red-Head is trying to stuff this up but that is another story(National Licensing). But here at present we have different qualified trades for the protection of the consumer. God its bad enough having some gasfitters with licenses when they should never be allowed to even think about this. We commonly have photo sessions of Hacks thinking that they can do what we do and better. At least the cemetry is kept busy. Do what you do well and let others do similar. There is more than enough work for everyone and that my fellow forumites is what makes the wheel turn round and round..............!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • toolaholic
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    I guess I should give up My Cert. Welders papers Too. SOUR GRAPES

    Leave a comment:


  • OkieBill
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
    To Bad You're so unhappy. I have a license to do it all Here in Ca. Gen B allows to do most trades Legally. Just Did , framing, Elec. Including New service, Gas Line., and plumbing. All permitted and signed off .Sorry You're so Limited Yourself.What's it like to be an OKIE ?
    Now I see why the illegals are taking over your state...lol

    It's good to be an Okie, We have these things called trades where each craft is a master of their trade and gets a piece of a a job. All of the master craftsmen get together and give the customer a great job! See we understand that each craft has worked hard to get where they are and has a family to feed. I work for real General Contractors that sub out their work to Licensed master tradesmen not General contractors who believe that since they are allowed that means they can.

    The first step is to admit you are a greedy jack / hack of all trades who is only looking out for himself...

    While I have enjoyed a few of your trainwreck posts remember this is a professional plumbers forum of which you are not... If you worked hard enough for a trades masters license you would understand .

    Remember: "If you are not a pro or on your way to becoming a professional tradesman please use the "Ask the Plumbing Experts" Section"

    Leave a comment:


  • toolaholic
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    To Bad You're so unhappy. I have a license to do it all Here in Ca. Gen B allows to do most trades Legally. Just Did , framing, Elec. Including New service, Gas Line., and plumbing. All permitted and signed off .Sorry You're so Limited Yourself.What's it like to be an OKIE ?

    Leave a comment:


  • OkieBill
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
    E bay new manometer $47.77 voit gm35 any comments
    Yea, get a plumbing license and take a class to learn how to use it properly

    Leave a comment:


  • toolaholic
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Great info! Thanks BC

    Leave a comment:


  • blue_can
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by Cleanmen2 View Post
    Over here we are a little prehistoric. We use this thing called a Manometer which is a tube half filled with water. When you apply pressure on one side it pushes the other up. If there is a leak then the water seems to level out. I think it was a Plumber who invented this too but we let the Engineers write the procedure..................ehehheheheeehhhheeeeehe ehheheehe
    I had no idea who invented the manometer but I looked online and apparently it was Otto von Guericke - a German scientist in the 1600s.

    I'm also somewhat prehistoric - I have a cheap $20 water manometer for taking gas pressure readings. I would probably buy a digital one if I did this kind of thing for a living.

    The principle of the water manometer (U-tube manometer) is very simply – you fill a tube open at both ends with water and when both ends are exposed to atmospheric pressure the water level in both is the same. This can also be used as a level.

    If you pressurize one end the water gets pushed up by a certain amount. Here in the US we use “WC to refer to this pressure and that’s the number of “ the water gets pushed up by. In the SI system of course this would be measured in bars or millibars.

    For me in addition to doing the 15# test I also typically use a manometer to check for leaks by pressurizing the system and then shutting the gas off and monitoring the system pressure with the manometer. I also use my manometer to measure the static gas pressure if I need to size gas lines. I have all the gas lines in my home modeled on an Excel spreadsheet. By taking the static gas pressure if I need to add new lines etc I can plug the static pressure into my spreadsheet and size the gas line so that at full flow the pressure at the appliance does not drop below the recommended minimum. It an alternative and more accurate computation than using the gas tables which most people do. My spreadsheet is based on the actual gas flow formula.

    Leave a comment:


  • toolaholic
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    E bay new manometer $47.77 voit gm35 any comments

    Leave a comment:


  • Flux
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by Cleanmen2 View Post
    We use this thing called a Manometer which is a tube half filled with water.
    I carry a manometer on my truck

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob D.
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by Cleanmen2 View Post
    One of the greatest downfalls in our industry here has been the loss of knowlege and skill-set. years ago with a job like this one Rick we would have a chart recorder on the installation for 24hrs minimum. Thjis would give a true indication and quickly too. Records the rise and fall with night and day temperature difference. Now they have become horrendously expensive and unless you are doing big installs not worthwhile. Second hand ones, well the guys with them got the smarts real quick and are nearly as expensive as a new one
    More expensive? Old paper chart recorders are pretty much worthless around here. I don't know whay anyone would want one today as the maintenance is prohibitive.

    Everything has gone digital here and there are many options that are reasonable in price. There are even digital pressure gauges that will record high/low readings for recall later, so they could be used to document pressure rises or drops overnight say. You can get a calibrated datalogger with a pressure transducer for a couple hundred bucks. If your gauge, unless its a manometer or similar primary standard, should be calibrated as called out in the code, and the gauge range can not exceed 5x the test pressure IAW 2003 IFGC which is the copy I have with me, I doubt the requirements have changed in the later versions.


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    Last edited by Bob D.; 01-26-2013, 07:29 AM.

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  • Cleanmen2
    replied
    Re: Gas line pressure tests

    Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
    It upto the administrative authority at their discretion for a gas test and lenght of time.

    I had an inspector do a 24 hour test on a building we did with a 4" main. Still only a 10# pound test, but 24 hours and he sealed the gauge so it couldn't be touched.

    On medium pressure gas we had to do 75# test. Also on welded systems too.

    Temperature changes will only affect an overnight or extended test. Ive seen pipe dope fail with temperature extremes on different materials. Like steel to aluminun on seismic gas shut off valves years later.

    Rick.
    One of the greatest downfalls in our industry here has been the loss of knowlege and skill-set. years ago with a job like this one Rick we would have a chart recorder on the installation for 24hrs minimum. Thjis would give a true indication and quickly too. Records the rise and fall with night and day temperature difference. Now they have become horrendously expensive and unless you are doing big installs not worthwhile. Second hand ones, well the guys with them got the smarts real quick and are nearly as expensive as a new one

    Leave a comment:

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