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  • #31
    Re: Salt-less Iron Removal anyone try one???

    Originally posted by speedbump View Post
    Water softeners use salt. Iron filters use either Potassium Permangenate , Chlorine or air to oxidize the iron so the Manganese greensand or what ever media is used can trap it. Softeners do remove some iron, but never all of it. In my opinion, softeners should soften water and iron filters should be used to remove iron. Get the iron out first and the softener will last much longer.

    There is a fairly new filter (or head) that draws air each night to oxidize not only iron, but sulphur (rotten egg odor) too. It's made by Fleck and works very nicely.

    The salt free softeners actually use Potassium Chloride instead of Sodium Chloride (salt) so that's how they make the Salt Free claim. The magnetic units are a joke, but you would be amazed at how many people fall for them.

    I have never heard of the salt from a softener ruining a septic tank, but I guess anything is possible. The amount of salt that is used should be minute.
    thanks Speedbump I know your right about the softeners only doing a small amout of iron I think 3 or 4 Parts so their good for wells with only a little iron. in Mass we don't have hard water.... almost no place... but the acid is bad when we treat the acid it raises the hardness and then must be treated... her Acid must be about the same as everyone in that area... 4.5 to 5.5) yes REALLY BAD. so you have to get the system to do everything... but I'm sure I could do something without the salt. and now that you guys have informed me that a small amount of salt won't kill the septic maybe I won't worry in the future.

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    • #32
      Re: Salt-less Iron Removal anyone try one???

      I wouldn't be worried about the salt from a softener hurting the septic tank. It's chlorine and some of the other harsh chemicals that hurt the tank by killing off bacteria that eats (yuck) all the goodies in the tank.

      The new Fleck head is kind of always been there, someone just figured out that drawing air instead of salt brine or potassium permanganate it would do the same basic job, so they added a screen. I wonder if there is actually any difference from the old to the new.

      We have surface water that is about 5.5 PH and I thought that was bad. Less than 5 must be a real tough one to treat. It's too bad you have to make the water hard to raise the PH then add a softener to take the hardness back out.
      Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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      • #33
        Re: Salt-less Iron Removal anyone try one???

        The salt discharge from a softener will not effect a septic tank and in fact it actually helps with the bacterial action however, an improperly sized or improperly set up softener can put a whole lot more water into the septic system which if ou have an older system on the edge of failure may indeed cause problems but its not the salt, it's the added water volume.

        Pyrolox; great stuff, effective and works well but...it is heavy and requires high flow rates to lift and wash the bed. Some residential water pumps and or the house piping may not be enough to properly backwash it.
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        • #34
          Re: Salt-less Iron Removal anyone try one???

          I have seen several installs with a softener and iron filter on wells with little shallow well pumps that won't make enough flow or pressure to lift the bed. Takes about two weeks for the homeowner to realize something real bad has happened. Because not many of the installers will give refunds.
          Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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          • #35
            Re: Salt-less Iron Removal anyone try one???

            Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
            The salt discharge from a softener will not effect a septic tank and in fact it actually helps with the bacterial action however, an improperly sized or improperly set up softener can put a whole lot more water into the septic system which if ou have an older system on the edge of failure may indeed cause problems but its not the salt, it's the added water volume.

            Pyrolox; great stuff, effective and works well but...it is heavy and requires high flow rates to lift and wash the bed. Some residential water pumps and or the house piping may not be enough to properly backwash it.
            If you read the warranty of any ATU septic system (which many states now require or are in the process of requiring) they all state discharging a water treatment system into their system voids the warranty.

            How does discharging a water treatment system help with bacterial action?
            To improve the bacterial action you need to add oxygen & some systems add carbon after the oxygenation process then recyle part of it it back to the oxygenation process.

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