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  • CPVC VS Copper Supply Lines

    I've been told by a plumbing contractor that CPVC is a better product/option compared to Copper for supply lines. I've always thought copper was/is superior. Is it really a matter of opinion or factual. I'm in the process of finishing a vanity bathroom - my house has copper lines, however I'm considering putting CPVC lines for this bath after what I was told. Any insight on this would be much appreciated.

  • #2
    I feel you have been told CPVC is better because it is less expensive, faster to install, requires fewer & cheeper tools to install.
    I dislike CPVC is the veriety of sizes are limited & after the joint is glued & assembled, look inside the pipe at the joint. You will see the glue reducing or completly closing the pipe.

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    • #3
      If you are a DIYer and don't have a lot of experience soldering copper then CPVC probably is a better option for you. In my opinion copper is a better product than CPVC and has a proven track record but CPVC certainly is an acceptable product.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        A copper installation does not break as easily. I have seen cpvc pipes broken by people jamming stuff under their sinks.
        Not to mentio...copper is just prettier to look at

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        • #5
          It would be best to see if the plumbing inspector will accept CPVC as a water supply. There are many concerns as the plastic breaks down in years to come and releases cancer-causing agents into your pottable water supply. That is why copper with a non-lead based solder is the preferred method.

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          • #6
            Working down here in Northern Florida where the water is super hard I've found that over time copper builds up deposits until the pipe is almost completely closed. This in turns creates a low water pressure problem. CPVC doesn't do this.

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            • #7
              CPVC is okay but I have found that copper is a lot better to use CPVC is for people who can't solder I agree with these guys and see what the inspector says CPVC is cheaper but not as good quality and leaks a lot more.

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              • #8
                Cpvc is for plumbers who cant soilder copper together,and if they cant do that they shoudnt be plumbing anyway!

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                • #9
                  If you are totally re-piping supply lines, and you have hard water corrosion problems, forget about copper entirely. PVC is OK but breakable and problematic. Pex is the way to go. Easy to install and theoretically lasts forever. It's flexible so you don't have the problems associated with both copper and PVC as far as obstructions in the way of runs are concerned.....just bend around them. The manifolds and fittings can possibly corrode but the chances of it happening anytime soon are rare, and besides it's alot easier to fix these than to repair pinhole leaks throughout copper lines or PVC cracks.
                  Oh, and Pex is not for guys who can't sweat copper. It's for guys who have sweat copper all thier lives and are sick of having to do it, and have found a better way to plumb with newer technology!
                  EDIT:
                  If copper and PVC are your only two choices, and you are only re-piping the bath, by all means go type M copper.

                  [ 04-02-2004, 03:55 AM: Message edited by: David M. ]
                  D.M.

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                  • #10
                    Always remember to check your state plumbing code before using any pipe. Everyone keeps mentioning type M copper. Type M copper is illegal in Louisiana for potable water. Type L is the minimum above grade and Type K is recommended below grade.

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                    • #11
                      Apologies for the mistake. I should have said type L copper. I would'nt use type M for any application, code or not.
                      D.M.

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                      • #12
                        In my opinion its type k copper and silvabrite all the way, everything else is questionable, pex is untested for long periods of time, remember poly-b was the stuff to use at one point (and of course it lasts forever ). If you are confident in your ability to make good solder joints you can look foreward to NOT opening that wall again for at least 40 years. If you are unsure of your soldering abilities I guess pex is acceptable. It never cost too much to do somthing right the first time.

                        [ 08-05-2004, 09:51 PM: Message edited by: Ghostfitter ]

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LMP1786:
                          Always remember to check your state plumbing code before using any pipe. Everyone keeps mentioning type M copper. Type M copper is illegal in Louisiana for potable water. Type L is the minimum above grade and Type K is recommended below grade.
                          Same in Massachusetts, I wouldnt use plastic unless the pipe was in a place where freezing was a concern.

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                          • #14
                            I agree CPVC is the cheap and fast way out. If your house has copper then use copper it's a much better job hands down. The only case in which I actually recommend CPVC is in a home with hard well water. Copper tends to develope pin holes over time so in this case CPVC is the better option. Other then that stick to copper.
                            Len<BR>Midlantic Plumbing & Heating

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