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  • brass sliver

    I was taking a part a waste N overflow and around the fine thread tailpiece female end a little debris was in there .I cleaned off to prepare the new tailpiece and a brass sliver went right in my thumb.I remembered going through my apprenticeship and a discussion about brass in the blood stream causing heart atacks.I just goy it out but thumb is really swollen. I put alcohol and antibiotics and such, just curious if this rings your bells gentlemen.

  • #2
    Re: brass sliver

    My wife stepped on a needle in the bathroom once. When she tried to get it out, it just went in deeper. Went to the doctor, she couldn't get it out. Finally had to call in a surgical team to extrct it with a scope. She says there was quite a crowd of interns attending. The alternative would have been to filet her foot to get it out. Otherwise, to the hearth it would have attempted to travel.

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    • #3
      Re: brass sliver

      Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
      My wife stepped on a needle in the bathroom once. When she tried to get it out, it just went in deeper. Went to the doctor, she couldn't get it out. Finally had to call in a surgical team to extrct it with a scope. She says there was quite a crowd of interns attending. The alternative would have been to filet her foot to get it out. Otherwise, to the hearth it would have attempted to travel.

      when I was 19 or 20. I stepped on a straight pin in the carpet and I didn't know it was a pin. all I had was a drop of blood and pain for 3 days. dr. never x-rayed it and after 3 days the pain went away. but would flair up as I was working or standing. 3 months later I couldn't walk and ended up going to the er. 2 days later they had to operate to get it out of my foot/ heel. took 2.5 hours and 2 scars to dig out a 3'' long pin.


      my mom fessed up many years later that she had dropped it and couldn't find it.


      I guess it was taking the longest path to my heart starting from my heel.


      not fun.




      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: brass sliver

        i'd be more worried about bacterial infection than silver based heart attacks. it takes a LOT of silver poisoning to cause problems
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: brass sliver

          Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
          i'd be more worried about bacterial infection than silver based heart attacks. it takes a LOT of silver poisoning to cause problems
          I got it out , used precautions cleaned /disinfected my thumb.When working with solvents or mission coupling or doing any drain work , I always use black nitrate gloves.i always been a little freaked out about hepatitis. One sewer guy I know caught it.But he also rods sewers BARE HANDED and does dig ups in shorts.Then gets something to eat afterwords and licks his fingers yuck!!!.lol.I put them under my rodding gloves while rodding .Sometimes even where safety glasses/goggles and always keep your mouth closed.lol

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          • #6
            Re: brass sliver

            Yup...I think it's the poison in the copper that does it. Copper cuts always suck
            Buy cheap, buy twice.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: brass sliver

              Used to work copper bare-handed (didn't like using gloves, even those thin cotton ones) and by the end of the day your hands would be copper colored with all the dust in your skin. When you got a cut in your hand as Ben said the copper dust does hurt until you clean it out. Fumes from soldering copper are now recognized as bad just like welding Stainless Steels are bad for welders(Hexavalant Chromium or CR(VI). Since copper is not used as much in construction as it used to be it may not be as big a health risk now but I can remember running large bore copper all day long and nothing but going along soldering behind a pair of guys who were fitting everything up. So the majority of my day was just soldering and this was back when lead bearing solder was still allowed so there was that health risk too. I spent many hours in tight spaces with poor ventilation soldering 2, 3, and 4 inch copper. Today I wonder how this would be handled, maybe not any differently but my point is maybe it should be.

              Copper toxicity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

              Strange that copper and brass were used for their antimicrobial properties almost to the exclusion of all other metals until recently and that they can have such detrimental effects on the body when taken internally. There are good and bad sides to everything.

              The antimicrobial properties of various copper based alloys required the surface to be clean and was one reason that brass was kept polished on a regular basis on items such as door handles and railings that many people came in contact with. Copper and brass have been shown to kill most bacteria within a coupe hours, this has been documented by the US EPA.

              The blood of Horseshoe Crabs is copper-based where ours is Iron. Used to see them by the hundreds when I was a growing up at the Jersey shore, they were all over the place. No so prevalent any more. I don't know why their numbers have dwindled in the past couple decades.
              Last edited by Bob D.; 01-19-2014, 06:57 AM.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: brass sliver

                Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                when I was 19 or 20. I stepped on a straight pin in the carpet and I didn't know it was a pin. all I had was a drop of blood and pain for 3 days. dr. never x-rayed it and after 3 days the pain went away. but would flair up as I was working or standing. 3 months later I couldn't walk and ended up going to the er. 2 days later they had to operate to get it out of my foot/ heel. took 2.5 hours and 2 scars to dig out a 3'' long pin.


                my mom fessed up many years later that she had dropped it and couldn't find it.


                I guess it was taking the longest path to my heart starting from my heel.


                not fun.




                rick.


                And I bet you love her even more Rick.................!!!!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: brass sliver

                  Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                  Used to work copper bare-handed (didn't like using gloves, even those thin cotton ones) and by the end of the day your hands would be copper colored with all the dust in your skin. When you got a cut in your hand as Ben said the copper dust does hurt until you clean it out. Fumes from soldering copper are now recognized as bad just like welding Stainless Steels are bad for welders(Hexavalant Chromium or CR(VI). Since copper is not used as much in construction as it used to be it may not be as big a health risk now but I can remember running large bore copper all day long and nothing but going along soldering behind a pair of guys who were fitting everything up. So the majority of my day was just soldering and this was back when lead bearing solder was still allowed so there was that health risk too. I spent many hours in tight spaces with poor ventilation soldering 2, 3, and 4 inch copper. Today I wonder how this would be handled, maybe not any differently but my point is maybe it should be.

                  Copper toxicity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                  Strange that copper and brass were used for their antimicrobial properties almost to the exclusion of all other metals until recently and that they can have such detrimental effects on the body when taken internally. There are good and bad sides to everything.

                  The antimicrobial properties of various copper based alloys required the surface to be clean and was one reason that brass was kept polished on a regular basis on items such as door handles and railings that many people came in contact with. Copper and brass have been shown to kill most bacteria within a coupe hours, this has been documented by the US EPA.

                  The blood of Horseshoe Crabs is copper-based where ours is Iron. Used to see them by the hundreds when I was a growing up at the Jersey shore, they were all over the place. No so prevalent any more. I don't know why their numbers have dwindled in the past couple decades.



                  This thread is just another amazing reason why the RIDGID Forum is invaluable.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: brass sliver

                    Originally posted by Cleanmen2 View Post
                    This thread is just another amazing reason why the RIDGID Forum is invaluable.

                    Yes I will second that it`s like going to the pub getting drunk and wandering what the hell you talked about for the last two hours on the way home when 0.5 wasn`t around but boys will be boys


                    Tony

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: brass sliver

                      Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                      The blood of Horseshoe Crabs is copper-based where ours is Iron. Used to see them by the hundreds when I was a growing up at the Jersey shore, they were all over the place. No so prevalent any more. I don't know why their numbers have dwindled in the past couple decades.
                      Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab Census « The Wetlands Institute The Wetlands Institute

                      http://www.capemaycountyherald.com/a...may-be-rebound
                      Last edited by Plumber Punky; 01-19-2014, 07:02 PM.
                      ~~

                      ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                      Comment

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