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Residential black iron gas pipe between undersized floor joists-Best securement?

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  • Residential black iron gas pipe between undersized floor joists-Best securement?

    I like black iron gas lines mounted well, with no potential for movement in any direction. On perimeters (walls) we usually use the normal 2 screw steel clamps, one clamp every 6 feet for anything 1/2"-1". Here's my (overthought) question....

    What do you guys prefer to use when running black iron between undersized second story floor joists? Would you continue to hard mount right to the side of undersized joists with steel clamps or would you hang freely with metal straps secured to two joists with the pipe "hanging" between? I'm wondering about the flex/vibration caused by foot traffic above/washing machine directly above, etc. Overthinking this or ????

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    I live in Marin County Ca. Keep in mind You're in seismic Country , No Girly Straps! Go STRONG SULLY
    Last edited by toolaholic; 08-14-2019, 04:08 PM.
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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    • #3
      Cut 2x4 blocks, nail them between two joists and strap the pipe to them. Your code book spells out maximum allowable distances between straps.
      You say you are a contractor. Are you a C-36 or B-1? If not a C-36, you shouldn't be running gas pipe.

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      • PLUMBER RICK
        PLUMBER RICK commented
        Editing a comment
        I agree with you. But unfortunately the cslb allows B contractors to do plumbing as long as they are doing 3 major trades on the job at the same time.
        Too many General contractors stretching the law and doing trades they shouldn't be doing.

        Rick

      • Bob D.
        Bob D. commented
        Editing a comment
        Does the definition of plumbing in CA include installing and servicing natural gas systems or is 'plumbing' limited to just what is included in the plumbing code?

        Here plumbers can install and service gas pipe, but it's done as you know under the mechanical code, not the plumbing code. Until recently we didn't even have a mechanical contractors license, so you could set up shop and do mechanical piping as long as it did not tie into potable water or vents or drainage systems. So you could install a boiler but you couldn't by the letter of the law make the connection to the domestic water system for your makeup water. So most mechanical and HVAC shops got a plumbing license even if they didn't want to do plumbing work. And many also hold an electrical license so they can keep everything in house.

        But that changed a couple years ago when they created a new license and grandfathered everyone already operating a mechanical or HVAC shop for the past 3 years in. And just so no one could say they didn't have a chance the law did not go into affect until 3 years AFTER it became law. So if you were smart you could setup shop the day before it became law and 3 years later be licensed without having to prove you know anything.

    • #4
      Ca uses it's own version of the Uniform Plumbing Code. It includes gas piping in the scope of work assigned to licensed plumbers.

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      • #5
        Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
        Ca uses it's own version of the Uniform Plumbing Code. It includes gas piping in the scope of work assigned to licensed plumbers.
        So you don't follow the International Fuel Gas Code. I can understand the need for some amendments because of the seismic concerns but it varies enough that they wrote their own and rolled it into the Plumbing Code. Did you do that with the Mechanical Code too.

        All our codes are listed here: https://www.nj.gov/dca/divisions/cod...reg/index.html

        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

        ----

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        • #6
          IAPMO uses the NFPA 54 as a guide. It also write's it's own mechanical code (UMC).

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          • #7
            Originally posted by plumbus View Post
            iapmo uses the nfpa 54 as a guide. It also write's it's own mechanical code (umc).
            almost all the western states use the iapmo codes, then add their own local codes that add to but not less then, FOR EXAMPLE IN LOS ANGELES, YOU HAVE THE CA. UPC, THEN THE L.A. COUNTY ADDITIONS, THEN YOU HAVE THE L.A. CITY WHICH IS JUST AS THICK AS THE UPC, BOOK
            Last edited by JERRYMAC; 09-15-2019, 01:39 PM.
            JERRYMAC
            E-MAILJERRYMAC777@GMAIL.COM
            CALIF. LIC. PLBG,HEAT,DRAINS,ELECTRIC,WATER HEATER, BOILER, POOL AND SPA HEATER
            FIRE SPRINKLER CONTRACTOR,
            SINCE JAN. 1989

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