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  • Replacing ball valve on water heater

    I want to replace the water shut-off valve at the water heater. I bought a 1/4 turn ball valve with sweat type ends. My question is, will the heat from the torch damage the seals inside the valve? Should I take it apart first? I'd rather leave it together as that would eliminate a possible leak but I don't want the valve seal damaged by the heat either.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Personally, I wouldn't take it apart. I've soldered lots of Ball valves in and never had a problem. You don't require that much heat. Just make sure the joint is clean, use a little flux, and you'll be fine.

    Comment


    • #3
      One tip someone told me one time is to open the valve half way and solder it. Somehow that is supposed to prevent warping the gasket. Make sure your pipes are drained completely and not dripping at all when you attempt to solder.

      Comment


      • #4
        If you know how to solder the valve will not get hot enough to harm it. If you are concerned about your soldering wrap a wet rag around the valve before you solder.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          if you're not sure on how to properly heat and solder, or the water doesn't poperly stop dripping, i would use a male adapter and then screw an ips (threaded) ball valve on. same goes with garden hose bibbs. much easier to screw on a replacement, than trying to unsolder and resolder a new valve.

          if you're really unsure, a compression style valve can be installed. i have them from 1/2'' - 1'' and never had an issue. remember just about every angle stop shut off valve to your fixtures are compression if connected to a copper line.

          also there is a "watts" 3 piece ball valve that is made to come apart to ease installation and soldering issues. you cut out a 1'' section and slip on the nuts, then the copper tailpieces. solder and insert the ballvalve section, tighten and you're set.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            That sounds like an interesting valve rick. Is it on their website?

            Comment


            • #7
              Theron,

              They are a standar 3-piece valve and should be in their catalogs and on their web page. The valves are a bit more expensive so you would not want to use them as an every day valve. However, you can cutom configure them for special applications as well.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Is it different from a normal compression ball valve? I looked all over their site and couldn't find it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Theron
                  Is it different from a normal compression ball valve? I looked all over their site and couldn't find it.
                  Here is a link:

                  http://www.watts.com/scripts/pro-products.watts?_cfg=./db/pro-products.cfg&_fil=cat2%3d'Full_Port_Brass_Ball_Val ves'.and.cat1%3d'Ball_Valves'.and.div%3d'_watersaf ety-flowcontrol'&_sn=pro-products&_tar=_view5_watersafety-flowcontrol

                  Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you know how to solder copper, you don't need a 3-piece valve. If you don't know how to solder copper, you need a plumber.

                    A 3-piece valve is for situations that do not have enough play to allow a socket fit valve to be installed, or situations where there is a drip past the up-stream isolation valve.

                    If you are dealing with a residential water heater, the 3/4" valve will survive the heat of basic soldering.
                    the dog

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      dog, why do i have propress

                      glad to see you're back full bore. was afraid that the cat got ya. plumber was in a good dog fight with flat rate ecs and josh pulled the plug. stick with your "guns"

                      as dog mentioned the 3 piece valve is used when you need a little bit of play to assemble the pipe. typically when you have limited room between fittings and no play. also if water is dripping it will allow for some drainage and steam to escape. usually once these valves are installed, there is no reason to take them apart. the watts that i referred to is a real do it yourself type valve. home depot was selling them in 1/2'' and 3/4'' sizes. i bought a few to test. not bad, but there are better options that i have.

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        wow

                        just for a shut off vallve

                        the uk scene is a lot different to the usa
                        service valves are compression most ov the time here for domestic installations
                        or push fit now a days but there is a big price difference lol

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK
                          dog, why do i have propress

                          glad to see you're back full bore. was afraid that the cat got ya. plumber was in a good dog fight with flat rate ecs and josh pulled the plug. stick with your "guns"

                          as dog mentioned the 3 piece valve is used when you need a little bit of play to assemble the pipe. typically when you have limited room between fittings and no play. also if water is dripping it will allow for some drainage and steam to escape. usually once these valves are installed, there is no reason to take them apart. the watts that i referred to is a real do it yourself type valve. home depot was selling them in 1/2'' and 3/4'' sizes. i bought a few to test. not bad, but there are better options that i have.

                          rick.

                          Rick,

                          The Dog has not lost his bite. He is tired.

                          I've been involved in a very intense project, a medical center, that we are running behind schedule on. So I have not had alot of internet time. I was not aware of Plumber's battle.

                          I'm a little disturbed about a thread being shut-down. I think that disagreements are healthy among trades-people. You and I have certainly had disagreements, we will probably have more. But we are still on speaking (or, I guess you would call it "writing" terms). We should be able to express our opinions, harsh, or not. There are certain limits, we would all agree to that: threats of violence. etc. But I've seen nothing but good healthy discussion here.

                          I know that I have sometimes been labled as a "flamer". I simply give my opinion, which is sometimes wrong. I admit to that. This forum is the best forum ever created for plumbers. There is more plumbing knowledge here than I have ever see on the internet. I value this resource like no other resource in the plumbing industry, because it is up to date info by people who know and are in the know.

                          I commend Ridgid for that. I've depended on their tools for years, and I love their website.

                          I can't comment directly on the thread that was shut down, I wasn't aware of it, but I would suggest letting the discussion flow.

                          My opinion.
                          the dog

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