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  • ? does any one RESHARPEN there pipe dies?

    Does any one RESHARPEN there pipe threading dies, or do you just replace when dull?

    If you do how do you go about it?

    Thank you
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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  • #2
    i've heard of this, but i never had it done. only a sprial reamer i had sharpened.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Only things I ever try sharpening are self feed wood bits. But threading dies??? I can't even see how you could do it properly without re-machining them on a lathe of some sort. Not worth it, they're too cheap to not just buy a new set.

      Comment


      • #4
        ? does any one RESHARPEN there pipe dies?

        When I was an apprentice we used to sharpen all our own dies. The shop had 20 or so Collins Thread-O-Matic 22 machines plus a 44, a 66 and a 6" to 12" Landis machine....

        We had a surface grinding machhine with a 1/8" grinding wheel. I sharpened many dies. If there was a broken tooth we'd just use a die grinder and take the one tooth out. Unless the corresponding tooth is missing on the other dies in a set it isn't a problem.

        Yes, I've been doing this a long time, when I started we screwed together all of the water, gas, vents, and waste pipe 2" and smaller...

        Does anyone else remember how to figure a rolling offset using a durham 72° and a 60°?

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        • #5
          howardw, anything beyond 4'' we typically welded. did you do fire sprinklers or pipe fitting. 6''- 12'' is big stuff for screw pipe

          i'm thinking about a #141 threader 2.5'' -4'' but then again do i really want to thread and wrench that big stuff

          no, will stick to propress. 6 seconds a joint, couldn't even apply teflon tape that fast.

          welcome to this forum, we can use the plumbers input. the electricians were starting to piss off some of the plumbers.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BHD
            Does any one RESHARPEN there pipe threading dies, or do you just replace when dull?

            If you do how do you go about it?

            Thank you
            if those pipe dies can be resharpen, then i like to hear about it..

            Comment


            • #7
              Collins Thread-O-Matic 22

              I remember using a Collins Thread-O-Matic 22. They were pretty nice with the automatic jaws. Didn't these machines have an oil path integeral to the die head as opposed to the seperate oiler tube as the Ridgid has? I think it was Collins that had this, when you dropped the die head down then oil was ported through the head to the flood the cutting area and cool the dies.

              Haven't seen or used a Collins in over 15 years, are they still in business? Seems just about every place I have worked has had Ridgid machines.

              Never mind that last question. I just searched for them and found their website, they are still around it seems.
              Last edited by Bob D.; 03-11-2006, 10:13 AM.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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              • #8
                Originally posted by HowardW
                When I was an apprentice we used to sharpen all our own dies. The shop had 20 or so Collins Thread-O-Matic 22 machines plus a 44, a 66 and a 6" to 12" Landis machine....

                We had a surface grinding machhine with a 1/8" grinding wheel. I sharpened many dies. If there was a broken tooth we'd just use a die grinder and take the one tooth out. Unless the corresponding tooth is missing on the other dies in a set it isn't a problem.

                Yes, I've been doing this a long time, when I started we screwed together all of the water, gas, vents, and waste pipe 2" and smaller...

                Does anyone else remember how to figure a rolling offset using a durham 72° and a 60°?

                The method I use for rolling offsets is the following:

                1)Find the offset (the diagnal distance between the centerlines) by the following: a) Scale the roll (the horizonal distance between the centerlines)
                on one side of a square. Scale the rise (the verticle distance
                between the centerlines) on the other side of the square.
                Measure the distance between the two points and convert
                the number to the scale you are using. This is the offset.

                or


                b) Find the square root of the rise squared plus the roll squared.
                This will also give you the offset.

                2) Once you have the offset:

                For 72 Degrees....(Offset X 1.052) - (The Fitting Take-off)= The Travel
                For 60 Degrees....(Offset X 1.155) - (The Fitting Take-off)= The Travel


                I don't have the fitting data for a Durham 60 or 72 degree elbow. With my limited computer skills I have never figured out how to write math symbols.
                the dog

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                • #9
                  You guys must have a lot of time on your hands and alot of money to pass around in wages to sharpen all those dies instead of just buying a new set. I just think it's kinda silly, but that's my two cents.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AZPlumber
                    You guys must have a lot of time on your hands and alot of money to pass around in wages to sharpen all those dies instead of just buying a new set. I just think it's kinda silly, but that's my two cents.
                    I agree.

                    Buying new dies makes sense to me. Especially considering that pipe dies are tapered, and very difficuclt to sharpen, and if they are shapened wrong the result will be repairing alot of screwed piping, which will result in an extreme amount of labor time. I'm for buying new dies.
                    the dog

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Best thing to do with those dies that get screwed up when resharpening is give 'em to the sparkys.

                      It doesn't matter if their conduit 'leaks' a little bit.
                      ---------------
                      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                      ---------------
                      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                      ---------
                      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                      ---------
                      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                      Comment

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