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  • getting into pex

    My son and I are signing up for a WIRSBO training class.

    our next remodel includes a complete re-pipe from meter in, along with extensive bathroom relocates. Do most of you use clear for hot and cold?
    do use you use red and blue?. I feel i should give a warning about possible rodent problems and plastic tubing. one plumber advises their customers to leave containers of water out if using DECON or similar rat poison.

    i plan on buying the propex hand expander tool and using propex plastic fittings. this is a permitted job and will make sure pex is ok with the inspector 1st. will do manifolds and follow all WIRSBO guidelines.
    all comments welcome and appreciated. thank's as allways TOOL
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

  • #2
    I have the clear tubing (both hot and cold) in the new house I moved into in Oct. I covered it with the split type insulation, but that doesn't seal it 100%. This week noticed some mice around the edge of the house (we live on the edge of a woods/swamp) I had planned to use Decon in the crawl space to keep them from becoming a problem. Co you know where I can get more info on the need to leave water out if I use it?

    Go
    Practicing at practical wood working

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    • #3
      i can only say that i used wirsbo pipe for in floor heat and to run supply lines to other parts of the building and never had a problem yet
      Charlie

      My seek the peek fundraiser page
      http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


      http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

      new work pictures 12/09
      http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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      • #4
        tool, don't think pex for potable water is approved in calif. yet. it's a union thing. i know for radiant heat it's approved. this has an oxygen barrier.

        i have the same tools, propex expander sitting on the shelf.

        check with your local city building and safety dept. first

        rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #5
          decon and pex

          I'm sure at some point the pros will have some input.

          MY source was a very sharp plumber that likes and does a lot of pex.

          talk to a pest co. and find a way to deal with mice other than a product that will drive mice to thirst ,as DECON does. traps seem a better deal with pex. allum pie plates with water around the crawler seems to be good insurance for poisen products. thank's tool
          I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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          • #6
            Rick

            there using it in all the new tracks up north ,so i'm told. north of marin co.

            i'll have more info next week
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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            • #7
              pex and ca.

              Just read ca. lost the pex lawsuit in 2003
              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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              • #8
                If you are going to do alot of pex work, do yourself a BIG favor and get a power expander. I bought the manual one first, and thought the hell with that noise now it's a small boat anchor. The pneumatic one works great.

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                • #9
                  thank's Bill

                  I'll spend the $$ and go for the air one. people like you make this site great

                  tool
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                  • #10
                    RE: Rodents. The other problem with pex, besides the rodents seeking water after eating poison, is that they will try to enlarge a hole in wood that the pex is going thru and chew thru the pex. They sense the airflow thru the small hole and try to get thru it. IE. Pex coming from crawlspace thru floor to kitchen sink angle stops.

                    Personally, I transition to copper before rising vertically from crawlspace into the home...a little extra work, but well worth the peace of mind for everyone.

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                    • #11
                      Norcal: The house I'm in now was just built last year. I'm assuming the lines are pex (semi-clear plastic with what looks like brass fittings), and they go straight up into the walls/etc. Would you suggest I caulk around those entry points? If so, what type of caulk would not harm the pex plastic.? I expect to have rodent problems (none yet) because we live on the edge of a woods/swamp, and, when I lived hear 30 yrs ago, we had a chipmunk chew through the floor of our trailer right next to the sink drain, so I know what you describe. He even tried to chew through next to the 220 wire for the stove, but I shoved steel wool down the opening and that seemed to deter him. I didn't remember that until your post, and didn't realize the fresh air flow is what alerted the critters to a possible entry point. Good Tip!
                      I would appreciate any advice on caulking/sealing the holes as replacing with copper at this point is not financially doable.
                      Practicing at practical wood working

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Gofor
                        Norcal: The house I'm in now was just built last year. I'm assuming the lines are pex (semi-clear plastic with what looks like brass fittings), and they go straight up into the walls/etc. Would you suggest I caulk around those entry points? If so, what type of caulk would not harm the pex plastic.? I expect to have rodent problems (none yet) because we live on the edge of a woods/swamp, and, when I lived hear 30 yrs ago, we had a chipmunk chew through the floor of our trailer right next to the sink drain, so I know what you describe. He even tried to chew through next to the 220 wire for the stove, but I shoved steel wool down the opening and that seemed to deter him. I didn't remember that until your post, and didn't realize the fresh air flow is what alerted the critters to a possible entry point. Good Tip!
                        I would appreciate any advice on caulking/sealing the holes as replacing with copper at this point is not financially doable.
                        Yes, it sounds like you have pex, by your description.

                        I don't know of a "sure fire" solution. Because the pex lines "move" with expansion/contraction its nearly impossile to get a permanant seal around the pex. You can try a silicone caulk, but it will loosen up over time and create a gap that air will get thru.

                        I'm sorry to be the bearer of potential bad news. I think there is going to be quite a bit of repair work on this pex in the coming years, once the "new" construction neighborhoods start to deteriorate and have rodent problems. The only solution that I know is the one I described earlier...transition to copper before entering the house from the crawlspace.

                        BTW: Just a little FYI. Recently I had to patch/epoxy a dishwasher that a rat chewed thru. Yes, right on the lower corner of the plastic tub(3/4" hole)...I couldn't believe it. I've seen rodents chew thru rubber and plastic dishwasher hoses and pex but never such a hard plastic. Those little suckers are tough!

                        I also recently replaced a 2" vertical ABS drain line behind a kitchen sink, in the wall, that a rodent chewed thru at floor level...the out-of-town owner wouldn't believe it until I sent him a picture of the destruction.

                        Good luck

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                        • #13
                          what we use to protect the gas csst risers in wood is a piece of steel electrical flex. this is suppose to keep a nail from penetrating. i suppose the critters teeth will have a hard time too. the issue is to install this protective sleeve would require cutting the pex, enlarging the hole to accept the flex and then splicing the pex back together.

                          well you might as well use copper at this point.

                          i would think that a few good screens around all vent openings and crawl spaces will keep the critters out.
                          maybe a cat

                          you can always electrify the place. it worked for the last plumber on the moles

                          rick.
                          phoebe it is

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK

                            you can always electrify the place. it worked for the last plumber on the moles

                            rick.

                            you may want to hold off on this ,we do not know what happened to plumber.he has not bin around for some time , maybe the moles got the best of him
                            Charlie

                            My seek the peek fundraiser page
                            http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                            http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                            new work pictures 12/09
                            http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks guys. If and when (probably more "when" than "if"), I now at least know to find a plumber that is set up for pex, and have some ideas on what I would ask him to do during the repairs. Hopefully I'll be able to keep the critters out, or can entice a king snake to take up residence (which would also keep out copperheads). Of course, I would have to evict him if I invite a plumber over!
                              Practicing at practical wood working

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