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  • 1/2" copper clamps

    Okay so I am a carpenter doing a bit of plumbing! But I have a question.
    I installing a shower valve and need to secure the 1/2' copper to the blocking. I do not want to trust the copper nails that come with the clamps. What kind of screws can be used that will not cause a problem with the copper?
    I could use some help ASAP as I want to close up the wall in the next day or 2. Thanks,Tom

  • #2
    I don't believe there is anything wrong with the copper nails. Aluminum or Galvanized roofing nails work good. They do make a strap for copper lines that are plastic and come with nails already in the strap. They come in sizes from 1/4" up to at least 1''. Should be in any hardware store. I've had no problems with any of the brands.
    Last edited by Mastadon; 03-20-2006, 12:00 PM.
    If it weren't for your plumber, you wouldn't have any place to go!

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    • #3
      The galvanized will last longer than the aluminum. The copper strap won't corrode, the nails will. If you put copper and aluminum together in a moist environment, the aluminum will corrode pretty quickly. If you use galvanized, the zinc coating will be the sacrificial metal, thus protecting both the copper and the steel nail.
      Practicing at practical wood working

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      • #4
        If you are strapping copper lines to wood blocking, use copper 2-hole pipe clamps, screwed in with brass wood screws. This will avoid elecrolysis problems, and hold it secure for decades.

        Using galvanized straps on copper without insulating it will cause electrolysis, and is against code.
        Last edited by plumbdog10; 03-21-2006, 12:47 AM.
        the dog

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        • #5
          As for the galvanized, I was speaking of the nails, not the straps. Using steel straps without insulation, galvanized or not, will corrode the straps as well as erode the copper. As the steel corrodes and gets rough, it will saw right through the softer copper. That said, brass screws with the copper straps would be definitely be the best choice, providing the wood isn't too hard. Even pre-drilling some of the hard wood found in older houses will not prevent rounding off the threads or breaking the brass screws. Aluminum is anodic to copper and should not be used without insulating each other, or the aluminum will quickly corrode. I was addressing the issue from a corrosion standpoint. My apologies for not making that clearer in my previous post.
          Practicing at practical wood working

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          • #6
            but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express....

            These work for me.

            Lorax
            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Gofor
              As for the galvanized, I was speaking of the nails, not the straps. Using steel straps without insulation, galvanized or not, will corrode the straps as well as erode the copper. As the steel corrodes and gets rough, it will saw right through the softer copper. That said, brass screws with the copper straps would be definitely be the best choice, providing the wood isn't too hard. Even pre-drilling some of the hard wood found in older houses will not prevent rounding off the threads or breaking the brass screws. Aluminum is anodic to copper and should not be used without insulating each other, or the aluminum will quickly corrode. I was addressing the issue from a corrosion standpoint. My apologies for not making that clearer in my previous post.
              Looking at your profile, what trade are you in? You don't list that information. You seem to feel you are qualified to respond, but your answers are unplumber-like, and make no sense from someone who has done this for years.
              the dog

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              • #8
                lorax has your best option right there, those supports are so easy to deal with, even as a "sparky" when you need to move some pipes for a while.
                "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
                "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by plumbdog10
                  Looking at your profile, what trade are you in? You don't list that information. You seem to feel you are qualified to respond, but your answers are unplumber-like, and make no sense from someone who has done this for years.
                  I worked in the corrosion/structural repair trade for 38 years. 25 years of that was working primarily with aircraft and all the support equipment that goes with their operation. 13 years was working on infrastructure, which included fuel lines, water lines, sewer lines, boiler plants, hot water/steam distribution systems, water towers, and gantry structures including the launch gantries at Cape Canaveral. The work involved evaluating the above infrastructure using ultrasonics and radiography using Iridium 192 as the gamma source as an NRC Licensed radiographer. It also included testing the cathodic protection systems on underground lines and water tanks, and chemical analysis of the treatment used in the boilers and hot water/steam systems. So yes, when it comes to corrosion and metal properties, I do feel qualified to respond. My first post regarding galvanized and aluminum nails was in response to Mastodon's post, and I believe he is a plumber. My second post was agreeing with your solution and attempting to clarify that I was addressing the corrosion aspect, not the plumbing code.
                  My responses are not plumber-like because I am not plumber. I am also not an electrician, but during 6 of the 13 years on infrastructure, I had the opportunily to help rebuild 2 power plants, and overhaul 100-5000 kw field generators which produced from 110v to 5160v as well as manufacture portable High voltage, 3 Phase electrical distribution boxes which are still in use today in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait and Iraq. I also have overhauled automobile engines, built boat docks, bottom-painted and rewired boats, been a bus-boy in restaurant, bucked hay bails, pulled horseradish, built sheds, helped frame and finish a house, and ran a cylinder grinder as a union machinist for a year.
                  Guess that covers most of my background. I will change my signature line to avoid any further confusion.
                  Practicing at practical wood working

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gofor
                    I worked in the corrosion/structural repair trade for 38 years. 25 years of that was working primarily with aircraft and all the support equipment that goes with their operation. 13 years was working on infrastructure, which included fuel lines, water lines, sewer lines, boiler plants, hot water/steam distribution systems, water towers, and gantry structures including the launch gantries at Cape Canaveral. The work involved evaluating the above infrastructure using ultrasonics and radiography using Iridium 192 as the gamma source as an NRC Licensed radiographer. It also included testing the cathodic protection systems on underground lines and water tanks, and chemical analysis of the treatment used in the boilers and hot water/steam systems. So yes, when it comes to corrosion and metal properties, I do feel qualified to respond. My first post regarding galvanized and aluminum nails was in response to Mastodon's post, and I believe he is a plumber. My second post was agreeing with your solution and attempting to clarify that I was addressing the corrosion aspect, not the plumbing code.
                    My responses are not plumber-like because I am not plumber. I am also not an electrician, but during 6 of the 13 years on infrastructure, I had the opportunily to help rebuild 2 power plants, and overhaul 100-5000 kw field generators which produced from 110v to 5160v as well as manufacture portable High voltage, 3 Phase electrical distribution boxes which are still in use today in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait and Iraq. I also have overhauled automobile engines, built boat docks, bottom-painted and rewired boats, been a bus-boy in restaurant, bucked hay bails, pulled horseradish, built sheds, helped frame and finish a house, and ran a cylinder grinder as a union machinist for a year.
                    Guess that covers most of my background. I will change my signature line to avoid any further confusion.

                    Your post says alot. The big point is: YOU ARE NOT A PLUMBER. Your quote "...I am not a plumber." says it all.

                    Hey, many aircraft have toilet rooms. As a plumber, I know toilet rooms. Am I now qualified to do your job?

                    I've piped numerous aero-space plant projects (Boeing, Hughes, etc.). Am I now qualified to design rockets. Your post was designed to impress, with tech. terms, no plumber would understand. Not because plumbers can't. But because it is not our expertise.

                    I'm wondering why someone who is not a plumber would feel the need to respond as an expert.
                    the dog

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lorax
                      These work for me.

                      My guess is there is not a single plumber on this site who would consider using a one hole clamp. A single hole clamp is not bad when your running wires or such that you don't anticipate movement with. However, plumbing pipes often will move, bounce, jump and /or whatever due to temperature and or pressure changes.

                      If I was securing a tub and/or shower assembly I would secure the shower riser and tub spout to a 2X4 using drop-eared 90s and a couple of drywall screws. The valve should be secured using whatever mounting attachment provisions were made by the manufacturer.

                      A small piece of felt behind any place where the pipe meets any framing and you are ready to do. If your are drilling holes to get the pipe to the fixture use a finned isolator. If you are using clamps use the plastic two hole clamps. I prefer the Acousto-Plumb but any of them will work.

                      Mark
                      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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                      • #12
                        mark, i run my 1/4'' ice maker lines with these 1 hole clamps. they are the clamps they sell for coaxial cable. but that's it. nothing larger than 1/4''.

                        dog, easy on the "rocket scientist".

                        we don't want this to turn into the electrical forum

                        where has plumber been

                        it's not my turn to watch him. i did send him an email.

                        maybe the moles got him


                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK
                          mark, i run my 1/4'' ice maker lines with these 1 hole clamps. they are the clamps they sell for coaxial cable. but that's it. nothing larger than 1/4''.

                          rick.
                          I'll give you that one but I assume you don't really consider a 1/4" supply line run outside the wall to be the same as a 1/2" water line which is run inside the wall. Better yet would you use that same style clamp on a 1/2" copper pipe in the wall?

                          Mark
                          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gofor
                            So yes, when it comes to corrosion and metal properties, I do feel qualified to respond. My first post regarding galvanized and aluminum nails was in response to Mastodon's post, and I believe he is a plumber. My second post was agreeing with your solution and attempting to clarify that I was addressing the corrosion aspect, not the plumbing code.
                            based on your background that you presented, IMHO, you are qualified to give an opinion on corrosion and metal properties.

                            I also believe that you are NOT claiming expertise on plumbing code nor on plumbing fixes.

                            Thanks for contributing to advancement of the forum

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK

                              where has plumber been

                              it's not my turn to watch him. i did send him an email.

                              maybe the moles got him


                              rick.

                              the last post from plumber was 3/3/06 i think the moles got the best of him
                              Charlie

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